Would Aliens Realize We Were Intelligent?

Greg Mayer, as part of a charming larger piece, relates a back and forth he had with some students a few days ago on whether or to what extent we and alien intelligent life forms would be able to identify each other as intelligent life forms:

I mentioned to the students that I’d seen a great web post that morning about first contact with aliens (h/t: PZ), which stressed the likely lack of similarity and extreme technological disparity between us and interstellar travelers (“nuclear weapons [used by them] vs. sponges [which would be us]“), and how a binary code would be the way to communicate, although PZ noted they’d probably collect several specimens for the interstellar natural history museum before they figured out the sponges [that would be us] were sentient. The grad student suggested that it wouldn’t be that bad, since convergent evolution would insure that they had some basic similarities to us. I said I’m not so sure, and noted that George Gaylord Simpson, in his famous essay on the nonprevalence of humanoids (link might require subscription), had argued strongly that life elsewhere is decidedly unlikely to be familiar to us. We discussed what basic similarities there might be among life forms evolved completely independently.  Bilateral symmetry?  Common on earth, but how many times had it evolved independently here? Cephalization? There were some interesting cases of it evolving in primitively radial urchins. Carbon based?  It beats silicon, but there was the Horta on Star Trek.

We went on to note that there were ways of trying to distinguish independent from convergent origins. Shared, yet arbitrary, characteristics, such as the genetic code, suggest a single origin (unless of course there are functional differences among possible codes, which would make them non-arbitrary), while clearly adaptive similarities might arise through convergence (see whales and icthyosaurs).

Your Thoughts?

About Daniel Fincke

Dr. Daniel Fincke  has his PhD in philosophy from Fordham University and spent 11 years teaching in college classrooms. He wrote his dissertation on Ethics and the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche. On Camels With Hammers, the careful philosophy blog he writes for a popular audience, Dan argues for atheism and develops a humanistic ethical theory he calls “Empowerment Ethics”. Dan also teaches affordable, non-matriculated, video-conferencing philosophy classes on ethics, Nietzsche, historical philosophy, and philosophy for atheists that anyone around the world can sign up for. (You can learn more about Dan’s online classes here.) Dan is an APPA  (American Philosophical Practitioners Association) certified philosophical counselor who offers philosophical advice services to help people work through the philosophical aspects of their practical problems or to work out their views on philosophical issues. (You can read examples of Dan’s advice here.) Through his blogging, his online teaching, and his philosophical advice services each, Dan specializes in helping people who have recently left a religious tradition work out their constructive answers to questions of ethics, metaphysics, the meaning of life, etc. as part of their process of radical worldview change.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X