Church “Adopts” A Public School With Aims Of Converting Students And Their Families

Completely devoid of any principled conscience that would object to mixing church and state, a principal and a church partner to proselytize a public school, using a budget crisis as an excuse:

When his budget for pencils, paper, and other essential supplies was cut by a third this school year, the principal of Combee Elementary School worried children would suffer.

Then, a local church stepped in and “adopted” the school. The First Baptist Church at the Mall stocked a resource room with $5,000 worth of supplies. It now caters spaghetti dinners at evening school events, buys sneakers for poor students, and sends in math and English tutors.

The principal is delighted. So are church pastors. “We have inroads into public schools that we had not had before,” says Pastor Dave McClamma. “By befriending the students, we have the opportunity to visit homes to talk to parents about Jesus Christ.”

And

Last fall, a school staffer who worships at the church told pastors about the school’s plight. In a visit to Combee shortly thereafter, Mr. McClamma, the church’s senior associate pastor of evangelism and missions, offered to start by opening a “resource room” stocked with supplies.

“I said, ‘Amen,'” recalls Mr. Comparato. “This was like a prayer answered.”

While Combee gained resources, the church gained access to families. At Christmas, the school connected the church with parents who said they wouldn’t mind being visited at home by First Baptist. The church brought gifts, food and the gospel. Of about 30 families visited over two weekends in December, 13 “came to the Lord,” says Mr. McClamma, a 58-year-old motorcycle buff who drives a black sports-utility vehicle with the bumper sticker “Christ First.”

Mr. McClamma says adopting Combee goes far beyond providing resources like school supplies. “The purpose is to show them the church cares, and that there is hope, and hope is found in Jesus Christ.”

“If they want to come in and help, who am I to say no?” says Mr. Comparato, the principal.

He says he would welcome congregations of any faith as sponsors, but adds of his students, “My personal conviction is that I hope through this they’ll know Jesus and they’ll get saved.”

Asked if the principal’s comments indicated he was promoting one particular religion, Ms. McKinzie, the Polk County superintendent, says, “He personally can hope anything he wants, as long as he offers programs at the school for parents who don’t believe in the Baptist faith or anything at all.”

As Hemant Mehta pointed out when he drew attention to this story, this is classic Christian strings-attached charity.  This is not about school children learning in school, it’s about getting school children “learning” in church.  This is about buying influence in whatever exploitative way it can.

And this is what conservative Christians want, public services defunded so that the poor and the sick and the uneducated, etc. are all at the mercy of churches for whatever resources they cannot afford.  Privatization of charity, to their minds, means dependence on religion, a Jesus tax on all good will.

Your Thoughts?

"Getting out of religion and back into nature is incredibly difficult. Cult-ural Science, cult-ural religion, ..."

Have I Considered Catholicism Sufficiently?
"Following on from my last past here - As pervasive as the term original sin ..."

Have I Considered Catholicism Sufficiently?

Browse Our Archives

Follow Us!


What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment