Red Neck, Blue Collar, Atheist

Hank Fox (who is one of my exciting new Freethought Blogs neighbors) wrote a book called Red Neck, Blue Collar, Atheist: Simple Thoughts About Reason, Gods and Faith which he plugs hilariously in the video below:

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His red neck, blue collar, and atheist credentials are extensive taken all together:

A former draft horse teamster and cowboy, Hank Fox has been kicked, stepped on, knocked down, bitten, and bucked off by horses. (Fortunately, there were those other times when he got along with horses just fine, and even stayed in the saddle.) Growing up in Texas with a bunch of rodeo cowboys and rednecks, roping calves and quarter horses, his early blue collar work history included driving a dump truck and soda delivery truck, working as a framing carpenter, and work as a roofer and roofing company foreman. Later he served as a mule packer, ranch hand and wilderness horseback ride guide in California’s Sierra Nevada mountains. He drove hay wagons and sleighs professionally for 8 years, hitchhiked around the United States more than 26,000 miles, and even once hopped a ride on a freight train. Older now, he does a lot of his work indoors – but claims he can still saddle a horse and find his way in the wilderness, hitch up a team and get a wagon safely there and back, work cattle in the chute, hook up a two-horse trailer and tow it down the highway, and maybe even diamond-hitch a pack on a mule for a wilderness trip. Raised in a household with a Jehovah’s Witness father and a Southern Baptist mom, he started to have doubts about religion by the time he was 13. It took him 20 years to figure it all out, but he ended being a confirmed atheist, and later even an antitheist — which he describes as, “Not only do I not believe in supernatural superbeings, but I don’t think you should either.” A lifelong writer and journal-keeper, he started jotting down his thoughts and ideas on religion and atheism in private, later graduated to blogging, and eventually began to imagine writing a book on the subject. That book became “Red Neck, Blue Collar, Atheist: Simple Thoughts About Reason, Gods & Faith.” Today he lives on what was once a farm and egg ranch in Upstate New York, only a short walk from a clear stream, with red foxes, wild turkeys and deer for neighbors. He makes his living through writing and, still true to his blue collar roots, rather annoyingly menial work in a supermarket bakery.

He can also boil down the debates about religion to an issue of proper feline identification.

Your Thoughts?

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About Daniel Fincke

Dr. Daniel Fincke  has his PhD in philosophy from Fordham University and spent 11 years teaching in college classrooms. He wrote his dissertation on Ethics and the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche. On Camels With Hammers, the careful philosophy blog he writes for a popular audience, Dan argues for atheism and develops a humanistic ethical theory he calls “Empowerment Ethics”. Dan also teaches affordable, non-matriculated, video-conferencing philosophy classes on ethics, Nietzsche, historical philosophy, and philosophy for atheists that anyone around the world can sign up for. (You can learn more about Dan’s online classes here.) Dan is an APPA  (American Philosophical Practitioners Association) certified philosophical counselor who offers philosophical advice services to help people work through the philosophical aspects of their practical problems or to work out their views on philosophical issues. (You can read examples of Dan’s advice here.) Through his blogging, his online teaching, and his philosophical advice services each, Dan specializes in helping people who have recently left a religious tradition work out their constructive answers to questions of ethics, metaphysics, the meaning of life, etc. as part of their process of radical worldview change.


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