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The Evolving Jesus Story

Christian apologetics - does God exist?If the gospel story were true, it wouldn’t change with time. God’s personality wouldn’t change, God’s plan of salvation wouldn’t change, and the details of the Jesus story wouldn’t change. But the New Testament books themselves document the evolution of the Jesus story. Sort them chronologically to see.

Paul’s epistles precede Mark, the earliest gospel, by almost 20 years. The only miracle that Paul mentions is the resurrection (1 Cor. 15:4). Were the miracle stories so well known within his different churches that he didn’t need to mention them? It doesn’t look like it.

Jews demand miraculous signs and Greeks look for wisdom, but we preach Christ crucified: a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles (1 Cor. 1:22–3).

The Jews demand signs? That’s not a problem. Paul had loads of Jesus miracles to pick from. But wait a minute—if the Jesus story is a stumbling block to miracle-seeking Jews, then Paul must not know of any miracles.

Miracles come later, with the gospels. Looking at them chronologically, notice how the divinity of Jesus evolves. He becomes divine with the baptism in Mark; then in Matthew and Luke, he’s divine at birth; and in John, he’s been divine since the beginning of time.

The four gospels were snapshots of the Jesus story as told in four different communities at four different times. Because the synoptic (“looking in the same direction”) gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke share so much source material, their similarity is not surprising. Nevertheless, 35% of Luke comes uniquely from its community (such as the parables of the Good Samaritan and the Prodigal Son), and 20% of Matthew is unique (such as Jesus and his family fleeing to Egypt after his birth and the zombies that walked after Jesus’s death). And, of course, John is quite different from these three, having Gnostic and (arguably) Marcionite elements.

This synoptic similarity undercuts the argument that the gospels are eyewitness accounts. If the authors of Matthew and Luke were eyewitnesses, why would they copy so heavily from Mark? The authorship question (that Mark really wrote Mark, etc.) that grounds the claims that the gospels record eyewitness history is another tenuous element of the evolving story, as I’ve written before.

The gospels don’t even claim to be eyewitnesses (with the exception of a vague reference in John 21:24, in a chapter that appears to have been added by a later author). And even if they had, would that make a difference? Would tacking on “I Bartholomew was a witness to all that follows” to a gospel story make it more believable?

Would it make the story of Merlin the wizard more believable?

Consider some of the noncanonical gospels that include attributions. “I Simon Peter and Andrew my brother took our nets and went to the sea” is from the Gospel of Peter, and “I Thomas, an Israelite, write you this account” is from the Infancy Gospel of Thomas. These gospels are rejected both by the church and by scholars despite these claims of eyewitness testimony. Why then imagine that the vague “This is the disciple who testifies to these things and who wrote them down; we know that his testimony is true” (John 21:24) adds anything to John?

There are dozens of noncanonical gospels. Christian churches reject these in part because they were written late. But if we agree that the probable second-century authorship for (say) the gospels of Thomas, Judas, and James is a problem because stories change with time, then why do the four canonical gospels get a pass? If the gospel of John, written 60 years after the resurrection, is reliable despite being a preposterous story, why reject Thomas, written just a few decades later?

The answer, it seems, is simply that Thomas doesn’t fit the mold of the version of Christianity that happened to win. History, even the imagined history of religion, is written by the victors.

Read the first post in this series: What Did the Original Books of the Bible Say?

God made everything out of nothing,
but the nothingness shows through
— Paul Valery

Photo credit: Wikimedia

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About Bob Seidensticker
  • Orbital Teapot

    To Bob S,

    Actually, Paul thought of Jesus as divine, as you can read in Philippians 2:6-7.

    Another point is that miracles stories are not necessarily meant to be historical records. Just as talking animals in Aesop’s tales are not literally true, but are literary devices for the author to make a point.

    It’s funny how atheists read the Bible in the same way fundamentalists do, yet claim to be more sophisticated than they.

    Maybe what you need is acquaintance with liberal theology?

    • Bob Seidensticker

      Another point is that miracles stories are not necessarily meant to be historical records.

      Convince all of Christianity of that and we’ll both be happier.

      It’s funny how atheists read the Bible in the same way fundamentalists do, yet claim to be more sophisticated than they.

      If the positions really were identical, that would be quite puzzling. But I think there are important differences between fundamentalist Christians and atheists.

      Maybe what you need is acquaintance with liberal theology?

      If liberal theologians don’t take the Bible literally, then I guess I don’t have as much of a beef with them.

      If you imagine that there are liberal interpretations of the Bible that I’ll find compelling, feel free to summarize them.

      • Orbital Teapot

        I would even go farther and hold that the corpse of Jesus need not have been revived by a miraculous intervention and endowed with paranormal powers (as Neo was at the end of Matrix). We may have other conceptions of the meaning of resurrection in store. But of course, the Gospel writers wanted to make it clear that Jesus did rise from the dead, so they wrote about an empty tomb. I don’t want to deny the life-transforming event witnessed by the apostles. They DID experience something powerful. But we need not be committed to either naturalism or literalism.

        I will never convince all of Christendom of that. How to convince 2,2 billions people of something pertaining to theology?

        I don’t say atheists and fundamentalists believe the same things. They cannot be further apart from one another. But they use the same reading methods (or lack thereof). For instance, both would agree that a single contradiction in the Bible would be fatal to Christianity. That’s why we find lists of contradictions in the Bible in skeptics’ websites and we find fundamentalists writing whole books to explain away those inconsistencies.

        • Bob Seidensticker

          I would even go farther and hold that the corpse of Jesus need not have been revived by a miraculous intervention and endowed with paranormal powers …

          For what to happen? For you to believe that God exists?

          I don’t want to deny the life-transforming event witnessed by the apostles. They DID experience something powerful.

          How do you know?! That’s like saying that Dorothy really killed the Wicked Witch.

          The gospel story is a story. Why imagine that it’s true?

          How to convince 2,2 billions people of something pertaining to theology?

          I hear you. In the category of religion, open-minded reasoning is in short supply.

          But they use the same reading methods (or lack thereof).

          Some Christians say that the Bible is literally true. No atheist says that the Bible is literally true–big difference. The atheist simply says, “Let’s suppose that you’re right and see what happens.”

          Saying, “Hey–do you atheists know how much like Christian fundamentalists you sound?” doesn’t do much for me.

    • Bob Seidensticker

      Teapot:

      I just came across this discussion that seemed to mirror your thinking. I haven’t watched the video yet and so don’t know if it’s worth anything. But until I do, FYI.

      • Bob Seidensticker

        Just watched the video. It nicely rejects the literal reading, but I don’t see what supernaturalism remains (though these theologians apparently see some).

  • Rick Townsend

    You’ve written previously of your fictional timeline and have been challenged on it. Just because you assert it doesn’t make it so. Just because you cite a knowledgeable source doesn’t mean he holds the consensus position among historic theologians. And since consensus is your god, you ought to go with more if it in the area of historic understanding of Christianity.

    This is your blog, and you will always have the last word because you don’t have another job besides promoting your view and your book. So frequently you will be challenged and will still provide an answer, adequate or not. Don’t confuse having the last word, or with following someone else’s comments with a response of your own which they don’t answer, with having the right answer. It just may indicate they see no point in continuing to argue with someone who always considers himself the final arbiter and seldom acknowledges their points thoughtfully.

    In this case, your made up timeline may not be original with you, but you have been challenged on it before and your position is not the consensus among experts in textual evidence and Biblical studies. You will likely respond with some degree of vigor and I won’t likely respond, but that doesn’t mean you are correct. It just means you are unwilling to consider the consensus when it doesn’t suit your purpose.

    You can’t prove that your version of the evolution of the story is more reasonable than the historically accepted timeline. Paul didn’t need to rehash everything that was in the public record, he built on it. He was writing to Christians in churches where the narrative about Jesus was already well established. Unlike the situation today, words were precious and restating such existing well established histories wasted precious ink and papyrus.

    The writings of the New Testament were accepted because they were known to have been accepted as inspired by the apostles. That is one reason the gospels you cite such as Thomas and others weren’t accepted.

    Just because you can imagine some other possibility doesn’t amount to proof that the consensus view is wrong. You need more than imagination for that. You need to actually counter the evidence. I see no such evidence in this post. Just your diatribe against what you don’t like. Not very convincing, I’m afraid.

  • Christian

    I know this post is from several months ago, but I have a thought as to an alternate interpretation which I think actually makes more sense.

    The verses you cite (I Cor. 1:22-23) mention “Jews [demanding] miraculous signs,” and you interpret this demand to be for STORIES of Jesus’ miracles. Firstly, this isn’t what the language most clearly indicates. It doesn’t say they were “[demanding] to hear stories of miracles,” it says they were “[demanding] miracles.” That’s not to say your interpretation is inherently wrong, but it’s certainly more of a stretch.

    Secondly, I think it’s more practically plausible to approach this demand as being for miraculous deeds performed in the present, that is, at the time in which Paul was writing. Jewish leaders who wanted to dismiss early Christians’ messianic claims wouldn’t sensibly settle for stories of miracles, because these could just as easily have been made up and thus could be dismissed as fables. I could tell you that my deceased grandmother was divine, performed miracles during her lifetime, and came back from the dead. Anybody could make that up and propagate it. However, if I could levitate a table for you through the power of my grandmother, that would give my claims some definite credibility. The failure of early Christians to perform miracles on demand may well have been what Paul was referring to.

    If we can agree that first century Jewish leaders weren’t fools, I think this interpretation of “[demanding] miracles” both fits the language better and frankly makes better sense. I think it’s your “Christianity is false!” confirmation bias which causes you to interpret the language as inferring an “evolving Jesus story” when it need not do so at all. The text of I Corinthians 1:22-23 doesn’t in any way prove that Pauline-era Christians didn’t believe in non-Resurrection miracles.

    • Bob Seidensticker

      Christian:

      It doesn’t say they were “[demanding] to hear stories of miracles,” it says they were “[demanding] miracles.”

      Interesting point. I would’ve thought that if they heard stories of miracles and weren’t satisfied, that would be made clear, so I’m not totally bought into your thinking. Nevertheless, if actually doing miracles was the issue, that’s not a problem either: “Whoever believes in me will do the works I have been doing, and they will do even greater things than these” (see John 14:10–14).

      Jewish leaders who wanted to dismiss early Christians’ messianic claims wouldn’t sensibly settle for stories of miracles, because these could just as easily have been made up and thus could be dismissed as fables.

      Again, if stories of miracles were available but some group was unimpressed, I think we’d hear of that. Paul’s epistles give no clue that he knew of any miracles besides the resurrection, so that’s my working assumption.

      I could tell you that my deceased grandmother was divine, performed miracles during her lifetime, and came back from the dead. Anybody could make that up and propagate it.

      You’re preaching to the choir, and yet Christians find these stories compelling … 2000 years later.

      As for Paul’s efforts, I think of them as a story. Did it actually happen that way? I dunno–maybe, but I don’t think it repays much agonizing over to work within the story to make sense of it.

      However, if I could levitate a table for you through the power of my grandmother, that would give my claims some definite credibility. The failure of early Christians to perform miracles on demand may well have been what Paul was referring to.

      You do have this to some extent: Peter heals a lame man (Acts 3:1–8); Philip exorcises (Acts 8:5–8).

      The text of I Corinthians 1:22-23 doesn’t in any way prove that Pauline-era Christians didn’t believe in non-Resurrection miracles.

      I recently scanned Paul’s epistles for every reference to the story of Jesus’s life. There’s not much, and there are no miracles besides the resurrection.

      Did I miss anything? Besides the biggie (1 Cor. 15, which tells us that he “died for our sins,” was buried, was raised on the 3rd day, and appeared to people), I was able to find: Jesus was a descendant of David, he was crucified, his crucifixion was analogous to the sacrifice of the Passover lamb, he was betrayed, and the Jews killed Jesus. And that’s it. If you can think of more, let me know.

      • Christian

        (I apologize in advance for not knowing how to block quote.)

        “I would’ve thought that if they heard stories of miracles and weren’t satisfied, that would be made clear, so I’m not totally bought into your thinking.”

        “Again, if stories of miracles were available but some group was unimpressed, I think we’d hear of that.”

        I’m not sure that I, in turn, am totally bought in to your own thinking. I don’t see why it’s necessary, or even particularly likely, that it would be recorded that a group was unimpressed with stories of miracles. I sincerely think you bear the burden here of showing why that would more likely be so than not.

        Firstly, even if that were so, what would be the purpose or benefit of Paul making note of it? “When we told them about the wedding at Cana they were like ‘cool story, bro’, but they didn’t buy it. We’ll try the Lazarus story tomorrow.”

        Secondly, if they’re not convinced (as those who stuck with Judaism clearly weren’t), what cause would they have to be impressed? Would they be pleasantly surprised by the early Christians’ collective creativity and imaginative prowess? What would it even look like for someone to be impressed by a miraculous story but to continue to believe it to be false?

        I think it’s fair to say people have a low tolerance for those who attempt to pass off fable as truth. As the hearer of the miraculous story can’t know exactly what’s going through the teller’s head, they must make a best guess based on their impression. The teller may seem to genuinely believe his story to be true, in which case it would be appropriate to dismiss him as crazy. The teller may seem to know the falsity of his own story, in which case the hearer might rightly grow angry over the attempted deception. Lastly, the teller may somehow be compelling in a way which causes the hearer to believe what’s being told.

        In any event, I think it’s highly unlikely that someone would hear these stories and be merely unimpressed. They ought either to dismiss the early Christians as delusional, charge them with attempted deception, or accept the stories as true and become Christian themself. However, unlike the Lewis trilemma which this setup incidentally resembles, I don’t think there are any further options.

        Thirdly, Paul really clearly wanted people to believe that Jesus Christ was divine, had died for the atonement of sins, and had risen from the dead. Whether he was absolutely right or absolutely wrong about these, that much should be clear to both of us. If he sensed that the Jews needed to hear miraculous stories in order to believe what he believed about Christ, he would’ve told people to tell stories of Christ’s miracles. It makes absolutely no sense for him to hear of a stumbling block between someone and the Christian faith and not to try to remove it.

        Fourthly, and this is the point which honestly renders this whole discussion ridiculous, Paul and the early Christians were already telling a whopping miraculous story about Jesus. It would be frankly ridiculous to suggest that the Jews only needed to hear miraculous stories of Christ to believe, because they were already hearing His miraculous resurrection proclaimed. Some of them clearly believed it, some of them clearly didn’t. I have no idea how more miraculous stories about Jesus would somehow have swayed those Jews who didn’t buy the resurrection story. However, where hearing more stories might have done nothing, seeing miracles performed might definitely have had an effect.

        Basically, it’s totally unfeasible to believe that there were no miraculous stories about Jesus which the early Christians might have told to the Jews and that the absence of such stories is what caused Jews to remain in unbelief. I think I’ve demonstrated that well enough. I’ll agree that Paul doesn’t explicitly mention any other miraculous stories about Jesus. However, this can neither prove an absence or presence of other miraculous stories about Jesus in the earliest Christian communities. Therefore, it cannot in any we be used to “prove” that early Christianity evolved from not having non-Resurrection miracle stories to having non-Resurrection miracle stories. I ask that you acknowledge this or present a better case.

        “You’re preaching to the choir, and yet Christians find these stories compelling … 2000 years later.”

        I don’t think this particular combox is the place to go into why I believe the claims of Christianity to be true, and I’m sure you’ve heard it all before.

        “You do have this to some extent: Peter heals a lame man (Acts 3:1–8); Philip exorcises (Acts 8:5–8).”

        It’s true that Acts contains accounts of miraculous occurrences. However, it’s worth noting that the early Christian leaders weren’t supposedly capable of these miracles by their own power, as a magician is capable of performing a card trick at his own pleasure. These supposed miracles were made possible by divine power. Paul, who honestly seemed to believe that he communed with God and that God was with the early Christians, wanted everyone to believe that the Christian faith was true. If he thought that he could work miracles at his own disposition for the skeptical Jews, do you think he would have refrained from doing so? If he had believed that he could direct those in other early Christian communities to go attempt miracles before skeptics and that God would cause miracles to happen in those circumstances, there’s no reason that he would have refrained.

        I realize there are some further trains of though to follow at this point, but I won’t go into them presently. What I mean to make clear is that Paul clearly didn’t believe that early Christians ought to seek to convince skeptics by performing (or trying to perform) miracles.

        • Christian

          In the last paragraph: *of thought

        • Bob Seidensticker

          Christian:

          (I apologize in advance for not knowing how to block quote.)

          Not a problem. Your way works fine.

          If you want to do it, do this:

          [blockquote]Quoted text goes here[/blockquote]

          except replace the square brackets with angled ones (less than/greater than). Problem is, of course, that you have one chance to get it right. Unfortunately, you can’t edit your comments (though if I see an obvious HTML error, I’ll fix it).

          I sincerely think you bear the burden here of showing why that would more likely be so than not.

          If someone needed actual miracles, not just stories of miracles, then you’ve got all those apostles who could do them (John 14:10-14) and did do them (Acts 3:1-8; Acts 8:5-8).

          I guess you could say that these miracle workers hadn’t made it to Corinth? That the city was abuzz with stories of Jesus doing miracles and now his disciples doing the same thing but that (as if they were from Missouri) they demanded to be shown miracles? Perhaps that’s your point.

          I’m not trying to shirk my burden of proof, but when Paul says that the “Jews demand miraculous signs” and makes clear that he wasn’t able to satisfy them, it seems to indicate that he didn’t have any stories. Yes, it’s possible that he gave them a dozen miracle stories, both by Jesus and more recently by his disciples who’ve fanned out throughout the ANE, but that they weren’t satisfied. If that is the case, then I think we must at least charge Paul with being unclear. If his point was that his many stories weren’t sufficient, I think it’s reasonable to expect that he would’ve said so.

          if they’re not convinced (as those who stuck with Judaism clearly weren’t), what cause would they have to be impressed?

          This is the evangelists’ challenge, isn’t it? When they weave a powerful tale of the Son of Man and his amazing miracles, some listeners will convert and some won’t.

          I think it’s fair to say people have a low tolerance for those who attempt to pass off fable as truth.

          Knowingly doing so? Of course. But that’s not what we’re talking about. We’re talking about earnest believers trying to spread the Good News, aren’t we?

          The teller may seem to know the falsity of his own story

          Where did deliberate lying come in? I don’t see how that’s relevant.

          I think it’s highly unlikely that someone would hear these stories and be merely unimpressed.

          Then prepare to be amazed, because I hear the Christian’s story, and I’m unimpressed. Wouldn’t this be an option for the Corinthians, too? Here’s Paul, the purveyor of yet another religion, blah, blah, blah. There’s a religious zealot under every rock. I can’t swing a dead cat without hitting a fanatic telling me about his particular flavor of afterlife. And so on.

          I assume people would be skeptical then just like now.

          They ought either to dismiss the early Christians as delusional, charge them with attempted deception, or accept the stories as true and become Christian themself. However, unlike the Lewis trilemma which this setup incidentally resembles, I don’t think there are any further options.

          And “true believer” isn’t an option? I missed how that got ruled out.

          The 9/11 hijackers were wrong IMO, but they weren’t crazy or liars. They simply believed something that isn’t the case.

          If he sensed that the Jews needed to hear miraculous stories in order to believe what he believed about Christ, he would’ve told people to tell stories of Christ’s miracles.

          … unless he didn’t have any such stories. The only miracle story that Paul’s epistles contain (tell me if I’ve missed one) is the resurrection. That’s a biggie, admittedly, but Paul never places Jesus in history. Paul’s Jesus does no miracles, teaches no parables, is never put on trial.

          It would be frankly ridiculous to suggest that the Jews only needed to hear miraculous stories of Christ to believe, because they were already hearing His miraculous resurrection proclaimed.

          That’s a point, but let’s distinguish between miracles Jesus did (none, if Paul’s writings are our authority) and miracles done to him by God (resurrection).

          Sure, God can do a miracle, but Jesus apparently couldn’t.

          I have no idea how more miraculous stories about Jesus would somehow have swayed those Jews who didn’t buy the resurrection story.

          And yet Jews apparently “demand miraculous signs” but aren’t satisfied. I think I understand your point, and it’s not to be dismissed, but this is still a strong clue to me that Paul knew of none of the miracles later written up in the gospels.

          (And it goes both ways. Paul’s 500 eyewitnesses aren’t mentioned in the gospels, either.)

          I’ll agree that Paul doesn’t explicitly mention any other miraculous stories about Jesus. However, this can neither prove an absence or presence of other miraculous stories about Jesus in the earliest Christian communities.

          Of course it doesn’t prove anything. But Paul mentions the crucifixion and resurrection more than a dozen times each. Walking on water? Lazarus? Water into wine? Nothing. Not a one.

          You could argue that there was no point in repeating these stories because he’d already told them all. OK, but he’d already told them about the crucifixion and resurrection, and those were important enough to pepper his writing with.

          Therefore, it cannot in any we be used to “prove” that early Christianity evolved from not having non-Resurrection miracle stories to having non-Resurrection miracle stories.

          Who said that it did? We’re at an incredibly far remove from the actual events (300 years of hanky-panky separate Paul’s original 1 Cor. and our earliest copy–ouch!). All this is speculation and guesswork. I’m simply noting what Paul said (and didn’t) and wondering who this Jesus actually was. And, as you suggest, that Christianity evolved from Jesus being an ordinary person, perhaps (the Adoptionist view) to being divine fits the facts fairly well.

          We’ve seen that with Mary in the Catholic church, where she’s almost the 4th figure of the Godhead, so we know that this evolution happens.

          (More in a blog post on Wednesday, probably, so I appreciate your pushing me on this.)

          These supposed miracles were made possible by divine power.

          Agreed, but I’m missing your point.

          If he thought that he could work miracles at his own disposition for the skeptical Jews, do you think he would have refrained from doing so?

          Of course not. And that we have no record of his doing so is yet another clue about what he thought about his religion.

          If he had believed that he could direct those in other early Christian communities to go attempt miracles before skeptics and that God would cause miracles to happen in those circumstances, there’s no reason that he would have refrained.

          Agreed, but you’re now on my side of the issue.

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