Vignette from the New York Subway

Presented without further comment:

Last night, when I got on the subway, I noticed an older, balding white man wearing a white T-shirt. The front of his shirt read, in multicolored block letters, “I’m so happy I’m saved,” and the back read, over a backdrop of flames, “I won’t have to spend eternity in the lake of fire. P.S.: There won’t be a drink of water there!”

As the train pulled away from the station, a young black man entered the car. He announced that he was down on his luck, was trying to collect money for food, and would rather get it by begging than by robbing or mugging. He said he would sing for us in exchange for donations, and launched into an a cappella rendition of “Lean on Me”.

Mr. Evangelical, who was standing right next to the young man, responded by hunching over, grimacing, and sticking his fingers in his ears.

About Adam Lee

Adam Lee is an atheist writer and speaker living in New York City. His new novel, Broken Ring, is available in paperback and e-book. Read his full bio, or follow him on Twitter.

  • http://intrinsicallyknotted.wordpress.com Susan B.

    Maybe the young man was a bad singer?

  • Walter W

    The young man should be praised on one side for being resourceful and on the other had he should get a job and who knows he may have a job and gets spending money that way on his way home.

  • http://thechapel.wordpress.com the chaplain

    Perhaps Mr. Evangelical would have donated if the guy had sung “Leaning on the Everlasting Arms.”

    Then again, perhaps not.

  • http://whyihatejesus.blogspot.com/ OMGF

    He’s already saved, so why does he need to help anyone else out?

  • Polly

    He’s already saved, so why does he need to help anyone else out?

    Precisely! And there’s a broader application.

    The whole notion of being “saved” and being completely unable to influence the incendiery fate of BILLIONS of others precipitates an inward looking attitude that says: “Well, at least I’m saved. I can’t convince those other poor souls beyond my paltry efforts. But, god is just no matter what. I’d better just shut up and be grateful”

    I’ve experienced this hopeless resignation at the thought of the world being doomed. The only comfort I could take was that, at least, I wasn’t doomed (and my wife).

    Rebelling against this horrific injustice (by rejecting such a plan of “salvation”) would, of course, just land ME in HELL along with them. Though I certainly built up a lot of anger and frustration toward my invisible friend at times.
    It sickens me to think about it, now.
    You develop a philosophy similar to the crowded life-boat scenario.

  • http://gretachristina.typepad.com/ Greta Christina

    You know, there’s two things that strike me about this.

    One is the obvious hypocrisy of being a loudly self-proclaimed Christian and yet not helping the poor and needy, even when they’re right there in front of your face. (The Good Samaritan story comes to mind: would God be more likely to reward an atheist who helped generously than a Christian who ignored him? Just another question on which the New Testament is unclear and internally contradictory.)

    But there’s the other issue — namely, the sin of pride. Does anyone else think it’s unbelievably, hubristically prideful to be convinced that you’re saved, to be positive that you know God’s will? And isn’t pride supposed to be a sin?

  • Herb

    Does anyone else think it’s unbelievably, hubristically prideful to be convinced that you’re saved, to be positive that you know God’s will?

    Not when the instructions for getting saved have been made perfectly clear in an infallible book with one and only one valid interpretation. I think the pride kicked in when he decided to advertise his saved status on a fracking T-shirt. Of course, he thinks he’s being a good person by spreading the word.

  • Alex Weaver

    The young man should be praised on one side for being resourceful and on the other had he should get a job

    Because, you know, they just hand them out in crackerjack boxes, with enough pay to actually afford NYC rent, even with the economy like this.

    I wish this story surprised me.

  • Christopher

    I wouldn’t have given the begger a damn thing as I don’t believe in charity – oddly enough, I take the side of the pompous religious man on this issue…

  • http://goddesscassandra.blogspot.com Antigone

    Yeah, jobs are so easy to come by.

    Christopher-

    In every thread, you just seem to reinforce that you are an unfeeling ass.

  • Christopher

    Antigone, how is not giving up my hard-earned cash to a street peddler “unfeeling?” Besides, it’s not like the hand-out will do anything more than provide a psychological reinforcement for his behavior: inspiring him to remain content to be a parasite that survives soley my the misplaced generosity and guilt of others.

    I would happily give the guy what he’s worth if he preformed a service for me that merits it, but just singing on a public transport doesn’t do anything other than get on my nerves. As soon as the begger offers me some service I could use (say… repair my barbed-wire fences, for example) I’ll be happy to discuss wages with him.

  • http://asmalldarklight.blogspot.com/ Matt

    Hey, the young man is indeed providing a service. And the fact that he makes a living means that there exists a market for it. (Say’s law is a counterargument to what I just said)

    Of course there’s the uncorrected externalities. Perhaps the government should not outlaw panhandling outright, but instead calculate the about of discomfort panhandling causes commuters and tax the panhandlers accordingly.

  • http://thegreenbelt.blogspot.com The Ridger

    In a system which requires between 4 & 6 percent of those who want jobs to be unable to get them (it’s called capitalism), I think those with jobs are morally obliged to assist those who can’t get them. YMMV of course.

    And if he’s indeed scamming me, what am I out? The price of a hardback book? If he’s not, he might eat for the first time all day.

  • Eric

    I usually give to beggars when they try to do something for me. I sometimes give when they don’t. I gave mone to Houston’s “Why Lie? I need a Beer!” on the spur exit near Montrose. When I lived in Alexandria Va, I gave money to this guy who posed on a milk crate almost perfectly still with a sign that said “Hungry, Please give”. When you gave him money he flipped a sign around that said “Thank You”. I bought good dog food and a 40 for a homeless guy with two dogs at LaBranch and Wheeler in Houston.

    NY panhandlers were a little agressive the few times I’ve been there, though soe sang for their supper and got their buck or two .

  • Alex Weaver

    I tend to give some money to panhandlers who are singing, playing, or otherwise trying to trade something for what they get – usually because I don’t have time and/or pocket change to stop and get them a fast food meal, which is my normal response to people with “need help” cardboard signs.

  • random guy

    We had a lot of homeless near the main drag by the college I went to. There were dozens of restaurants down this road, every time a homeless guy asked for money for food, I’d point at a store and say lets go in I’ll buy you a sandwich. They never took me up on it. They just got the money for alcohol or drugs.

    I don’t like using the word parasite in reference to a human being but it was hard not to after becoming familiar with these men and seeing them repeat this behavior for years. I don’t call them parasites though, cause if you just think about it for a little while any rage or anger you might have at them is replaced with pity. Its incredibly sad to know that there are these men passed out in filth, and no matter what you do to try and help them they’ll be right back there in a few days time. There were a few homeless guys who I saw once and never again. But then there were the guys who you got to know by name and that was what they did day in day out, that was just their life. Realizing that these guys never wanted or would try for anything else than that was just so depressing.

  • http://chadtudor.org Chad Tudor

    I give money to panhandlers who sing, play guitar, etc. Street newspaper sales are a great way for homeless and low income to earn money. Giving food is not a good idea, unless you discuss their diet before buying it for them.

  • http://www.atheistrev.com vjack

    But consider again what his shirt said. It was basically, “I’m saved and you’re not.” Seems entirely consistent with his behavior.

  • http://thechapel.wordpress.com the chaplain

    Random Guy – my husband does much the same thing. He’ll offer to take someone to a restaurant nearby and buy a meal. Not many take up the offer, but it’s happened occasionally. Several years ago, he was in a position to offer day labor to people. When he saw people with signs saying, “Will Work for Food,” he would give his business address and invite them to come see him the next morning. Unfortunately, none of them took up his offer.

  • Christoph

    There are many people who may not give for fear that they are supporting a drug or alcohol addiction, and possibly making it worse. I myself am that way, although there have been a couple of occasions where the subject in question did not have the usual related jitters and really looked particularly desperate standing out in adverse weather, that I did find myself giving something. I figured in those cases I would take the chance that I was actually giving a little help to tide them over for a bit, and if my observation was wrong so be it, at least my heart was in the right place. The singing for a hand-out is a new one on me though. On the flip side once in a while there is a 50-ish white guy who stands outside one of our Metro stops dressed to the nines (perfectly groomed in suit and tie no less) and has the audacity to panhandle, and I absolutely will not be handing him anything.

    To me the biggest point raised is that many Christians,especially born-again Evangelicals, will often smack everyone else in the face repeatedly with what a “charitable” lot that they are, how much “faith” that they have in goodness, and will rarely let a conversation pass that they do not feel compelled to inject their religious views and explain how this allows them the moral high ground, but yet many of their charitable endeavors are orchestrated only to further proselytizing or to benefit only their church rather than the community at large or its inhabitants. This man to me is a perfect example of the stance of someone making sure it is writ large that “I AM GODLY” and willing to receive any benefit that comes to him personally from such stance, but not willing to inconvenience himself in the slightest (even so far as having momentary empathy) towards another human being’s less fortunate situation. Then again he believes that his ticket is already stamped for his Rapture, so why should he bother with anyone else? The epitome of Evangelical kindness!

  • Christopher

    Matt,

    “Hey, the young man is indeed providing a service. And the fact that he makes a living means that there exists a market for it.”

    I know of people in my town that make a living defrauding government agencies, begging for donations or even rummaging through garbage dumps (you know, salvage for cash and such – yet these things provide no real service to anyone other than the one doing the act!

    You may say that the man in question was preforming a service, but I say he was merely begging in a more creative manner than most…

  • Jim Baerg

    Christopher

    I know of people in my town that make a living defrauding government agencies, begging for donations or even rummaging through garbage dumps (you know, salvage for cash and such – yet these things provide no real service to anyone other than the one doing the act!

    Why did you include rummaging through garbage dumps in that list? That one sounds unpleasant but honest to me.

  • Christopher

    Jim Baerg,

    “Why did you include rummaging through garbage dumps in that list? That one sounds unpleasant but honest to me.”

    Technically it’s not legal – as the owner of the land is proprieter of the dump and those doing the rumaging often do it under the cover of darkness – but that’s of no consequese to me: what I was pointing out is that people can make a living without really providing any service to anyone else. The legallity – or lack thereof – is of unimportant to my argument.

  • http://wilybadger.wordpress.com Chris Swanson

    Out of curiousity, why was the young man’s race mentioned? “…a young black man…” Had he been white, would you have said, “A young white man” or just “A young man”?

    I ask this at least in part because I blog myself (massive, massive plug!), and find myself getting caught up on things like that myself. I’m not racist at all, far from it, but I do occasionally do things like this and wonder why.

  • Christopher

    Chris Swanson,

    “Out of curiousity, why was the young man’s race mentioned? “…a young black man…” Had he been white, would you have said, “A young white man” or just “A young man”?”

    Does this really matter? I think Ebonmuse was attempting to paint the scene using visuals rather than make note of anyone’s “race.” Besides – “race” is only as real as it is perceived to be.

  • Alex Weaver

    Out of curiousity, why was the young man’s race mentioned? “…a young black man…” Had he been white, would you have said, “A young white man” or just “A young man”?

    I ask this at least in part because I blog myself (massive, massive plug!), and find myself getting caught up on things like that myself. I’m not racist at all, far from it, but I do occasionally do things like this and wonder why.

    Note that the middle-aged evangelical’s race (white) was also mentioned. Him being white and the young man being black may well have been an important factor in his choice to respond the way he did, so it was worth mentioning.

  • http://wilybadger.wordpress.com Chris Swanson

    Note that the middle-aged evangelical’s race (white) was also mentioned. Him being white and the young man being black may well have been an important factor in his choice to respond the way he did, so it was worth mentioning.

    You’re absolutely right! I totally missed that. I try to be very concious of what I write at times, which is why I don’t mention someone’s race unless it is relevant. I still make the mistake many, many times. I saw what seemed to be an irrelevant mention here, but upon reflection I can see that it might be.

    It’s not an even slightly big deal, just something I catch myself and others doing from time to time and occasionally wonder why.

  • Nes

    I hear that some people will carry some gift certificates for local restaurants or fast food joints and give those out instead of cash. Seems like a good way to assist someone when you fear that they may just be begging to get drugs or alcohol.

  • http://www.yunshui.wordpress.com yunshui

    I think the point everyone’s missing here is utter awfulness of the T-shirt slogan. It’s not witty, it’s not catchy, it’s not memorable… and WTF is with “PS: There won’t be a drink of water there!”?

    Did it look home-made? I can’t believe anyone could actually buy something so dreadfully written.

  • HeavyThinker

    When I got my first job in a small rural town in Virginia, (where I grew up) and was still a Christian, I would give a bit of money to the homeless I passed whenever I was in a larger city like Richmond or D.C.

    Eventually a friend of mine (a Catholic) who witnessed my behavior told me I should stop, because many of them would spend that money on drugs.

    So I changed my behavior. Instead of offering them money, I offered to buy them lunch. They almost always refused. This is the way it has been (with a few memorable exceptions) for the past 6 years or so.

    A few months ago I got a new high-paying job downtown. Every day between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. the sidewalks fill with men and women in suits and dresses, heading for a restaurant to get lunch.

    On one of my recent walks to get lunch I was accosted by a man asking for money for food. Here is our exchange:

    Homeless man: Hey, man, got some extra cash so I can get some food?
    Me: I won’t give you cash, but I’ll buy you some food at the hot dog stand there.
    The homeless man looks down and shakes his head and says “Naw.”
    Feeling righteous, I look back up and say under my breath “Big surprise.” The homeless man loosely grabs my arm.
    Homeless man: Do you know what time it is, son?
    Me: It’s 11:30.
    Homeless man: Don’t you know I’m not asking for lunch, I’m asking for breakfast?

    I gave the man $2, the only cash I had on me. I didn’t immediately understand what he was talking about. But eventually it made sense. If I took him down to the hotdog stand and bought him a hotdog, he would have food right now, but what about the next guy? What about when he wakes up at 8 a.m. when there’s no one on the street to beg for food or cash? What about tonight at 6 p.m. when the men in suits are all home?

    He might’ve gotten one over on me, but he gave me a reason … and after all, isn’t that what us atheists call ourselves? Men of Reason?

    (And Women of Reason, too.)

  • HeavyThinker

    If I took him down to the hotdog stand and bought him a hotdog, he would have food right now, but what about the next guy?

    I meant to say “what about the next meal?” I have no idea how “guy” slipped in there.

  • KShep

    Whenever I go into a large city I put several dollar bills—folded individually—into my front pocket for panhandlers. That way I don’t have to open my wallet. I know some of those guys are scammers (and some will snatch your wallet if you stop to open it), but I don’t have the time to figure that out. So I just toss them a buck or two and be done with it.

    And when the inevitable guy says, “Uh, dude, could you give me a twenty instead, because……” I respond firmly, “That’s all I have for you, man,” and keep moving.

    I’ve never had a problem, and I feel okay about helping the occasional person who’s having a much worse day than I’m having.

  • http://cranialhyperossification.com GDad

    I went to a large university near a fairly big city, but I grew up in a fairly rural area. I wasn’t so bumpkinish as to be completely surprised by the panhandlers, but the number of them did surprise me. I graduated high school in 1988, so it’s been 20 years since I first saw the panhandlers near the school.

    There was one guy who would shake a cup of change and chant, “Help is ON THE WAY!” at passersby. Several of my dorm mates remarked on how entertaining he was.

    A few weeks back, I was near the campus area to meet a friend for lunch. The same guy was there, doing the same schtick. I don’t know if that counts as entertainment, but he’s had the same gig for at least 20 years.

  • velkyn

    it is always a conundrum when asked for money by street people. Do you give it in hopes that it will do good and after it’s in their hands it becomes no longer you problem. As for people needing other people’s money, we have all needed it at some point. Whether it be the taxes of another person to help our taxes be enough to create worthwhile infrastructure, policing, etc, or if it’s enough to get a meal. No one is immune, not even the supposed “survivalist” nitwits.

    As for what the Bible says, it’s just the same excuses but at least by the Bible we know that they are thousands of years old. “God” will provide! Honest, he will. Oh, he doesn’t, well, that means you get extraspecial goodies when you’re dead! Even Jesus contradicts his “lillies of the field” nonsense with his excuse that there will be “poor with you always” in Matthew 26. If God actually cared, there wouldn’t be the “poor” at all. I’ve heard just how “charitable” the folks in my old church was. However, their idea of “charity” was sending themselves to Australia to be missionaries rather than helping people right down the road. I’m sure they all think that they will be in heaven too. Right up there with the god that is in their image.

  • Stryder

    In regards to Christian’s apparent lack of concern for lost souls in hell, I’ve been posting questions on a Christian discussion board recently and was surprised by some of the responses I got on this topic. Some admitted that they didn’t know how they’d cope with seeing all that suffering from their place on high in the afterlife, but many are of the opinion that God would somehow hide hell from them and cause them to forget all about the existence of such a place. The damned will be able to look up and see paradise, apparently, but the righteous will be shielded from witnessing the terror below.

    It seems that this scenario provides comfort to some Christians but it makes the whole thing seem more awful to me. How do you worship a God that works this way?

  • David D.G.

    Bill Cosby commented in one of his monologues that the New York City subway not only will take you where you want to go and bring you back, but the system goes out of its way to entertain you by putting “a nut in every car.”

    It seems this car had an extra who was just a lot quieter than the main act.

    ~David D.G.

  • http://goddesscassandra.blogspot.com Antigone

    I think the “There won’t be a drink of water there” has to do with the parable of the rich man, and the poor guy (who has a name, but I don’t remember it). In it, the poor guy would beg at the gates of the rich guy, but the rich guy ignored him. They both die, and the poor guy in heaven, sees the rich guy in hell, and the rich guy begs him to dip his fingers in water, so that he may have a drink. Poor dude responds that he cannot. So rich dude begs poor guy to go to his brothers, so that they may avoid his fate. Poor guy says no, they didn’t believe in god before, and they wouldn’t believe after he came down and told them.

    Kind of a downer of a story- but point is a) have faith b) be nice to people down on their luck. This guy seems to have missed part b.

  • Nurse Ingrid

    You raise an excellent point, Stryder. My fundamentalist relatives worried a lot about this. They knew they were saved, and were going to heaven, but they became quite distraught when they contemplated the future suffering of those of us in their own family whom they believed were bound for hell.

    In my opinion, this caused a lot of undue suffering for them at the end of their lives, because they couldn’t stop wondering how they would be able to enjoy heaven while knowing that their loved ones were in eternal torment.

    And they say religion is supposed to bring people together, and to bring comfort to people in their old age. That sure wasn’t my experience.

  • Stryder

    In my experience, how much a Christian suffers over the “friends in hell” issue varies a lot from person to person, and it probably has a lot to do with personality type. I do know that for more than a few of them it causes great discomfort, and takes quite a bit of the shine off their “sweet hereafter” musings. Not enough, usually, for them to question whether the whole thing is nonsense, unfortunately.

  • http://www.maulis.com Ben Maulis

    You are judging a man just because he got a bad t-shirt. He was obviously very poor and that is why he did not give any money. I used to work with some dirt-poor Mexicans. Our job was “moviendo pipas” – moving irrigation pipes in the fields. Every day we would move pipes and every day one of them would wear a “New Kids on the Block” t-shirt. He did not even know the language, and believe me he was not a fan. It was just a t-shirt that looked that way because of someone else’s bad taste.

    I was not there in this case, but I myself met another young black man. We were not on the subway but on the muni in San Francisco and the young man was singing,

    “As I come into Your presence,
    Past the gates of praise,
    Into Your sanctuary
    ‘Till we’re standing face to face.
    I look upon Your countenance,
    I see the fullness of Your grace,
    I can only bow down and say;
    You are awesome in this place, Mighty God;
    You are awesome in this place, Abba Father!
    You are worthy of all praise;
    To you my life I raise,
    You are awesome in this place, Mighty God.”

    While he was still singing, he got up from his seat and went to the back of the car and ministered to a drunkard sitting on the floor in his filth. He laid hands on him and prayed for him.

    You see this man, who was sixteen years old, knew what it was like to be in bondage to sin and he knew the way. I know because I had just been on Market street with him where he preached Jesus Christ, the power of God unto salvation. He spoke of how at thirteen he was addicted to alcohol and drugs. How he had lost his home and was on the street living in destitution and drunkenness.

    [preaching deleted —Ebonmuse]

  • http://www.maulis.com Ben Maulis

    Nurse Ingrid,

    Is it possible that either your relatives were mistaken or that you misunderstood them? The reason I suggest this is because you wrote that they “knew they were going to heaven,” but in fact Jesus never said that heaven was the destiny of the saved. Jesus said heaven would pass away.

    Your experience with religion may not have been what you expected, but consider that Jesus said, “Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not to send peace, but a sword. For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law. And a man’s foes [shall be] they of his own household. He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me.”

  • http://goddesscassandra.blogspot.com Antigone

    Yeah, that last quote makes me even less likely to want to worship this imaginary being of yours. Truly, he is a great sadist.

  • http://www.daylightatheism.org Ebonmuse

    You are judging a man just because he got a bad t-shirt. He was obviously very poor and that is why he did not give any money.

    “Obviously”? Do you suppose that by tacking that word onto your unsubstantiated assertions, you can make them more plausible?

    Had you read my post more carefully, Ben, you’d have noticed that what I thought worthy of comment was not just the fact that this evangelical didn’t give money, but his blatant rudeness in overtly attempting to shut out the young man’s plea.

  • Christopher

    Ben Maulis,

    “Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not to send peace, but a sword. For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law. And a man’s foes [shall be] they of his own household. He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me.”

    Translate: we are to take the things we value and throw them all alway at the command of this entity – just to show that we are somehow “worthy” of its attention.

    If such a controlling entity did exist and demanded that of me it would find itself on the business end of my blades – I don’t take too kindly to any being that would tell me to deny everything I am or be destroyed for saying “no.”

  • Nurse Ingrid

    Ben Maulis,

    Of course my relatives were mistaken! They believed in God, they believed in heaven and hell, they believed in eternal salvation. There is no evidence that any of those things are real. Nevertheless, their beliefs were strong enough to cause incredible hurt and conflict in my family, which had a lot to do with me getting turned off to the whole idea of religion.

    As for that creepy quote you cite, oh, I’ve “considered” that one before. And rejected it. Sorry, but I feel no need to worship someone who claims to come with a sword to turn loved ones against each other. Doesn’t sound like a very nice guy to me.

    And if you’re trying to convince me that your version of xianity is somehow better or different than what I heard in my family, I have to say, yours sounds every bit as implausible, weird, and unpleasant as theirs did.

  • Stryder

    One little aside here. I mentioned that I sometimes post on Christian message boards, and one thing I’ve noticed is that they are usually *heavily* moderated. If you post ideas and questions that are not in line with Christian doctrine you are quickly shown the door. And most of the time on atheist/agnostic discussion boards I find that *all* are welcome to post, from the most fundamentalist Christian to the avowed athiest. Now why do you suppose that is?

  • Alex Weaver

    Your experience with religion may not have been what you expected, but consider that Jesus said, “Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not to send peace, but a sword. For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law. And a man’s foes [shall be] they of his own household. He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me.”

    …and this is an argument in FAVOR of Christianity…why exactly?

  • velkyn

    ben,

    you said “While he was still singing, he got up from his seat and went to the back of the car and ministered to a drunkard sitting on the floor in his filth. He laid hands on him and prayed for him.” What do you expect when you pray? What did this person expect? That the drunk would rise and walk never to take another drink? That he would be cleansed from his “filth”? What about actually helping the man get home, get to a shelter, get clean clothes, etc?

    Praying is a great way to do nothing and convince yourself you are doing something.

  • Ingersoll’s Revenge

    As soon as the begger offers me some service I could use (say… repair my barbed-wire fences, for example) I’ll be happy to discuss wages with him.

    Heh, why does it not surprise me that Christopher owns a fence made of barbed wire?

    Sorry, i just couldn’t resist. ;)

    My only qualm about atheism is that the religious have a monopoly on the phrase, “There but for the grace of God go thee.” This story (and many user’s subsequent comments) demonstrate an important point. Likewise the responses – on both the religious and the non-religious end – demonstrate an important aspect of human nature, namely how good people are at divorcing themselves from reality.

    Okay, end moral observation.

    I found it amusing, though, that the man who was convinced that he was “saved” would allow an earthly inconvenience to get under his skin. Piety apparently does not make one immune to petty torment.

    But as they say, little things affect little minds.

  • http://www.croonersunlimited.com Jim Speiser

    I used to run into panhandlers at a certain McDonald’s every day. My solution was to offer them $10 if they would come back the next day with a filled-out job application. I even went into the McDonald’s and got one for them.

    Most times the panhandlers wouldn’t show up the next day. But one lady did, with a filled-out application to boot. I gave her the $10, then walked her into McDonald’s and up to the manager. After looking at her application, he looked straight at me, in her presence and said, “Are you kidding me? Is this a joke?”

    As Ebonmuse said, “Submitted without further comment.”

  • http://mayyoufindstrength.wordpress.com Norm

    What gets me is how people will take this story of a bad example of a Christian and build it is a testament that God doesn’t exist. Its illogical and cowardly. It is simply an excuse to not confront immorality in our own souls.

  • bestonnet

    Norm:

    What gets me is how people will take this story of a bad example of a Christian and build it is a testament that God doesn’t exist. Its illogical and cowardly. It is simply an excuse to not confront immorality in our own souls.

    Nice strawman.