Some More Election Thoughts

My earlier post, “Election Special 2008“, didn’t fully do justice to all the things I wanted to say about this election. I decided it would be better split into two parts, and here’s the second part.

First, the historic: A nation built by slaves, that fought a bloody civil war over emancipation, and that has grappled with the poisonous legacy of racism since its founding, has chosen a black man to be its President. Many of those who marched in the civil rights movement, who lived through segregation and battled Jim Crow laws, have lived to see one of their own elected to the most powerful position in the world. I didn’t live through the civil rights era, nor have I ever been the target of racism. But witnessing the jubilation among black voters, the raw outpouring of long-pent-up emotion, it’s impossible not to feel just a little bit of what they must be feeling:

“I walked out and shouted, ‘Glory hallelujah,’ and the whole place responded, ‘Glory hallelujah!’” Lowery said. “It’s been 40 years since we were shot down in Mississippi and Alabama trying to register to vote, and now I’m voting for a black man.”

Will Obama’s election put an end to racism in America? No – as with the progressive cause in general, this is a milestone, not a destination. But it can’t be denied that Obama’s ascent represents the shattering of the last and greatest of the color barriers. And I think it will be a boon to the cause of tolerance in another way: it will bring out the last, ugly remnants of open racism that remain in this country. I have no doubt – for we have seen it already several times – that much of the opposition to Obama will be couched in explicitly racist terms. America as a whole is better than this, but I think there are many people who have failed to acknowledge the degree to which racism still lingers. I think the Obama presidency, by flushing it out into the open, will make it impossible to ignore any longer, and that’s likely to be a valuable motivation for people of good will to work to defeat it once and for all.

Second, on the role of religion. Besides the welcome and deserved defeat of anti-atheist bigot Elizabeth Dole, the progressive movement can claim another trophy: the unseating of Robin Hayes, another obnoxious conservative who infamously claimed that “liberals hate real Americans that work and achieve and believe in God”. We can safely say that the average quality of Congress has risen by a significant fraction since these theocrats were ejected by the voters.

And, of course, we can now commence hearty laughter and mockery of pompous theocrats like Arnold Conrad, who pleaded with God to deliver John McCain victory, lest Hindus, Buddhists and other non-Christians “think that their god is bigger than you”. I guess Yahweh has shrunk several sizes since the election, eh, Arnold? And not least of all, Sarah Palin herself expressed her faith that God would do “the right thing for America” on Election Day. Those words are well worth remembering so that we can shove them in the faces of every evangelical bigot who pops up in the next four years to claim that God votes straight-ticket Republican.

On a more serious note, we can make one more observation on the role of atheists in politics. Ed Brayton reports:

In California, exit polls showed that those who attended church regularly voted against marriage equality 83-17%. Those who attended church only occasionally voted for marriage equality 60-40%. Those who do not attend church at all voted for marriage equality 86-14%.

This is why we fight for atheism. This is why we oppose religion as a force for evil in the world – because, as these results demonstrate, it is. Frequent church attendance is a superb predictor of whether a person opposes equality and fairness for all their fellow human beings. Conversely, gays and other progressives should recognize that when it comes to the fight for true social justice, nonbelievers are vital and dependable allies.

There’s one more topic I have some thoughts about, and that’s the future of the Republicans. In this election, McCain and the GOP ran an exceptionally vile and noxious campaign, one that was based almost entirely on appeals to hate and fear and on cultivating the resentments of a bigoted and extremist minority. This faction, though a minority in America as a whole, now constitutes a majority of the Republican party. They’re easy to rile up, but as McCain found out, they’re not enough to deliver the election all by themselves – and their focus on culture-war issues to the exclusion of all else has alienated the independents and moderates that the Republicans need to win. As the exodus of moderates continues, the GOP is increasingly becoming a rump party, one wholly in thrall to its most regressive and ignorant religious faction. In the coming four years, we can expect this trend to accelerate.

The standard-bearer of what remains of the GOP is Sarah Palin. She embodies all that the Republican party has become: a cheerful devotee of religious know-nothingism, aggressively ignorant, shamelessly bigoted, willing to pander to any prejudice or stir up any hatred in order to win. She’s already gearing up for a presidential run in 2012 – she was doing so well before the McCain campaign ended – and we can expect to hear from her again. Mitt Romney is doing likewise, and I suspect Mike Huckabee will return as well. And I couldn’t be happier about that.

All three of these candidates appeal to the same demographic, the white religious conservatives who increasingly define the GOP. In the next Republican primary, I predict that these three will fight a bloody battle over these voters. Especially with Palin in the ring, we can be confident that this contest will be defined by smear tactics and personal attacks. This means it will leave plenty of bitterness and hard feelings on all sides, no matter who wins, and the religious right will become even more fragmented and disillusioned with politics than they currently are. A civil war is brewing in the GOP, and we progressives can sit back and watch the party slowly begin to implode. I, for one, am looking forward to it.

About Adam Lee

Adam Lee is an atheist writer and speaker living in New York City. His new novel, Broken Ring, is available in paperback and e-book. Read his full bio, or follow him on Twitter.

  • http://thechapel.wordpress.com the chaplain

    I’ve frequently noted, in the past several months, that I’d like to see the Republican party clean house and marginalize the Religious Right and Neo-Cons. The more I read and hear, however, I’m beginning to think that events are going the other way around: the RR and Neo-Cons may be on the verge of marginalizing the more moderate members of their party. Well, that’s okay with me too. What I really want to see is for the current Republican party detonate and have a decent third party of moderate conservatives emerge; leave the current party to the wackos and establish their own party of sense and decency. I’m rather liberal myself (though not registered in any political party), but I’m not sure that another liberal party would be able to gain enough critical mass to play a significant role in American politics in the near future. So, I say, let the conservatives split and leave the way open for the liberals to get some things done while the conservatives fight amongst themselves.

    P.S.

    we progressives can sit back and watch the party slowly begin to implode. I, for one, am looking forward to it.

    If you bring the popcorn, I’ll bring the beer.

  • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/daylightatheism Ebonmuse

    If you bring the popcorn, I’ll bring the beer.

    You’ve got a deal. :)

  • Leum

    I have two interpretations for what’s happened to the Republican Party in the last eight years. The first is that, as the chaplain suggested, the conservative moderates are being marginalized and pushed into the Democratic Party, hence Obama’s endorsements by so many prominent conservatives. With any luck, these moderates will now realize how their conservative ideas led to neo-con and theocratic positions, and may either become liberals (ideally) or libertarians (less ideally).

    The second, and this is what worries me, is that these “moderates” are only jumping ship because they knew the party was going down, and will cheerfully endorse the wingnut of choice in ’12 or ’16.

    Chances are both of these are true for different conservative moderates. To any conservative moderates here who have seen the light, may I be the first to say, “Welcome!”

  • http://www.thewarfareismental.info cl

    Many of those who marched in the civil rights movement, who lived through segregation and battled Jim Crow laws, have lived to see one of their own elected to the most powerful position in the world.

    It was definitely amazing to be part of this piece of history! People were in the streets all over the place here – honking, hooting, hollerin…

    As far as your sentiments on the GOP, the following may be obvious to the point of redundancy, but is seldom seen this clearly articulated:

    “The Religious Right in recent years has allied itself with the Republican Party. The party’s leadership in turn has allied itself with the most powerful institutions among us – in particular, the huge multinational corporations that increasingly shape and even dominate our culture and our lives. Together, certain Christian fundamentalists, Republican politicians and corporate leaders have worked hard to impose their versions of Jesus on the rest of us; they exploit the name of Jesus, making it a marketing tool for power and profit.”*Clint Willis, from the introduction to the anthology Jesus Is Not A Republican: The Religious Right’s War On America, 2005 Avalon.

  • jack

    Rumor has it that the RNC is unhappy with Sarah Palin, not only because she was part of a losing ticket, but because of her insubordination, self-aggrandizement, stupidity and general nuttiness. I’m not necessarily predicting it, but I’m hoping she will fade into obscurity as did Dan Quayle.

    And while on this subject, I feel compelled publicly to proclaim my deepest admiration of, gratitude towards, and (dare I say it) love for Tina Fey! That woman has talent!

  • Leum

    And while on this subject, I feel compelled publicly to proclaim my deepest admiration of, gratitude towards, and (dare I say it) love for Tina Fey!

    You’re not the only one. The Democratic candidate for US House for my state endorsed the Obama/Fey ticket in one of his debates!

  • Vin

    Thankfully, I doubt we’ve seen the end of the Republican Party. In 1994, the Democrats started a decline that I thought spelled the end of their party, but they climbed back; the pendulum swings. Obama’s popularity will probably never be higher than it is now. Once he takes office, every decision he makes will anger some people, even his supporters. As I’ve said in a previous post, there are also atheists in the Republican party as well.

  • http://thechapel.wordpress.com the chaplain

    there are also atheists in the Republican party

    Unfortunately, their voices of reason are usually overcome by the roar of the religionists in the party. I respect and relish the fact that there are many atheists who are not comfortable with liberal ideals. That’s one reason why, rather than seeing them be forced to join the Democrats, I’d be pleased to see them split away from the religionists who have an unhealthy influence on the Republican party and form a party of their own. Even though I’m fairly liberal, I honestly want some good, well-founded, rational conservative ideas to be included in our political dialog. We liberals sometimes need to be kept in check too. I don’t mind rational conservatism. What I object to, regardless of where it falls on the political spectrum, is irrationality.

  • Justin

    I don’t think this schadenfreude is healthy. I would like to see the Republican Party have less influence, but I also want to see it clean house. Frankly, I think the attitude of “let it burn” is only going to get in the way of legislative compromise and any real progress. The purpose of a political party or movement isn’t to run the other party out of business.

    Frequent church attendance is a superb predictor of whether a person opposes equality and fairness for all their fellow human beings.

    Maybe I’m being optimistic, but I don’t agree. A person could regularly attend a liberal Christian church and be in favor of gay marriage. I think this prediction would be a safe assumption for people who go (however often) to politically or theologically conservative churches. Is there causation between conservative religious belief and opposition to gay marriage? Yes, but I think you could have been more careful in how you worded that paragraph, Ebonmuse.

  • http://fourblocksfromsanity.blogspot.com/ Ingersoll’s Revenge

    This election has perhaps been one of the most unpredictable in recent years, but there was one prediction that I made that seems likely to come to fruition. When election fever was heating up this summer, I casually remarked that whichever party didn’t win the presidential election would experience a split, with fringe elements splintering off into separate factions.

    I believe this may be what happens to the Republican party. The far right, now seen to be a detriment to a sound campaign strategy, may not find the theocratic solace that they crave in a Republican party that now wishes to appear moderate after an embarrassing defeat. It’s possible that they will form a new party, or even ally themselves with the Constitution Party. Either way, I’m not sure that the GOP can accommodate all of their constituents; they have spent the last thirty-odd years building a platform of support that is too broad, and this behemoth structure is likely to cave. Many of my relatives vote Republican, but they do so for economic reasons; they hate being associated with race agitators and religious nuts.

    The split may not come overnight – and who knows, it may be the Democrats that experience a split if Obama is defeated for reelection in 2012 – but I can almost feel it in my bones (I know ’round these parts that’s a poor excuse for evidence, but it’s all I have to go on at this point).

    These politicians have been at each other’s throats for too long. Some good ol’ clan warfare may be in order. Metaphorically speaking, of course.

  • bestonnet

    Justin:

    Maybe I’m being optimistic, but I don’t agree. A person could regularly attend a liberal Christian church and be in favor of gay marriage. I think this prediction would be a safe assumption for people who go (however often) to politically or theologically conservative churches. Is there causation between conservative religious belief and opposition to gay marriage? Yes, but I think you could have been more careful in how you worded that paragraph, Ebonmuse.

    Ed Brayton quoted in Original Post:

    In California, exit polls showed that those who attended church regularly voted against marriage equality 83-17%. Those who attended church only occasionally voted for marriage equality 60-40%. Those who do not attend church at all voted for marriage equality 86-14%.

    I don’t see why more careful wording would be necessary. There very much is a correlation between bigotry and church attendance.

  • Samuel Skinner

    It was on of the profound ironies of this election that blacks voted against extending civil rights to an oppresed group using the same rationale that was used against them.

    On the bright side, hispanics voted at about the same rates whites did, showing that while they are importing their cultural values, oppressing other people isn’t one of them. Which makes me happy:)

  • Justin

    I don’t see why more careful wording would be necessary. There very much is a correlation between bigotry and church attendance.

    All right; If you use the key word “predictor” then in the original context it works. I just wanted to point out the diffference between liberal church-goers and conservative church-goers.

  • Alex Weaver

    I don’t think this schadenfreude is healthy. I would like to see the Republican Party have less influence, but I also want to see it clean house. Frankly, I think the attitude of “let it burn” is only going to get in the way of legislative compromise and any real progress. The purpose of a political party or movement isn’t to run the other party out of business.

    If they’re hell bent on burning, let it be sooner rather than later.

  • Christopher

    And while on this subject, I feel compelled publicly to proclaim my deepest admiration of, gratitude towards, and (dare I say it) love for Tina Fey! That woman has talent!

    On top of that, she can do just as well in Washington as Palin did – or any other of those fuckers in Congress! But then again, so could a chimp that drinks its own urine…

  • Alex Weaver

    Or a scratched vinyl record.

  • Leum

    Hey! We don’t insult chimps or records around here!

    Koko for President, 2012!

  • Christopher

    Wow! That gorilla has more intellectual capacity than all of our Congressmen combined! She’s not my vote next election cycle!

  • Christopher

    Sorry – “not” should = “got.” These past few nights have been rather busy and my concentration is shot…

  • Jerryd

    “And not least of all, Sarah Palin herself expressed her faith that God would do ‘the right thing for America’ on Election Day”

    I find statements like Palin’s, that religious people make daily, utterly dehumanizing. How could a rational human believe that “it is God’s will” whenever something happens? This negates everything that is good about humanity: self-motivation, self-respect, good hard work to attain a goal–either alone or with others–the need for ethical treatment of others, the list is endless. Instead, these brainwashed religious fundamentalists give the credit/blame to an unverifiable god for everything that happens.

    So, rather than blaming the Republican party for running a negative campaign, for picking the wrong vice presidential candidate, for not organizing and getting out the vote like the Dems did, for totally ignoring the black population in America during their campaign, we’ll just say the loss was God’s will. How convenient. And how deplorable. And, as I said, how dehumanizing. For isn’t it the fact that we are intelligent, rational, critical thinking beings, able to affect the world by that mental ability, that differentiates us from all other animals? And here are religious believers brainwashed to think that a make-believe god does everything, literally erasing the definition of being human: our mind. Thus all that is positive about our human talents has vanished, now in the hands of an imaginary control freak, invisible eye in the sky, whose will determines everything. Don’t they realize, if that is the case, they might as well just go to bed and let God handle all their affairs. Their thoughts, desires, efforts are meaningless in the world their religion creates for them?

  • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/daylightatheism Ebonmuse

    I don’t think this schadenfreude is healthy… The purpose of a political party or movement isn’t to run the other party out of business.

    I would welcome the emergence of a rational, thoughtful opposition party, one that genuinely held to the principles of limited-government conservatism. But the Republicans, as affairs stand, are not that party.

    They are firmly under the control of their lunatic fringe, and for eight years and more we’ve seen the results when that movement gets into power: campaigns based on character assassination, profligate spending on unnecessary war, political positions packed with ideologues, a steady push toward Christian theocracy, and a contempt for science, reason and even the law itself. This party cannot contribute anything good to American political dialogue, not in its current state. It may well have to be razed and rebuilt from the ground up before that can change.

  • bbk

    I don’t think the Republicans will implode any time soon. Democrats got a free ride from two very intelligent men with great leadership abilities (Dean and Obama). But leadership comes and goes. The majority of the elected officials within the Democratic party completely lack the sort of principled vision that this last election ushered in. I just hope that everything that Americans have been fighting for doesn’t end up getting thrown in a dumpster like solar panels from the White House lawn.

  • 2-D Man

    I find statements like Palin’s, that religious people make daily, utterly dehumanizing. …This negates everything that is good about humanity…

    Fundamentalists don’t believe there is anything good about humanity. Keep in mind, this group believes that we are all going to be tortured forever by an infinitely powerful creature unless we kiss its ass and that this is perfect justice.

  • MAZZ

    I’ve got to say that I believe Obama was elected in spite of the lingering prejudiced beliefs of some of the people that voted for him. I know quite a few people that wouldn’t mind having a Black boss, supervisor, manager but would not like having that same Black person dating/marrying their son/daughter. I, and I’m sure many other people, would be hard pressed to call someone like this non racist.

    It’s as if, and here its possible I’m talking out of my butt, that those people recognize that the best person qualified (in this case Obama) should be making decisions but only at a distance. I think voting for a Black American doesn’t necessarily mean that those people aren’t racist, but recognizes what is required at the time.

    I believe that the idea that we are any closer to ending racism with this election is unduly offered.

  • KShep

    But leadership comes and goes. The majority of the elected officials within the Democratic party completely lack the sort of principled vision that this last election ushered in.

    This may be true for now (Pelosi), but I’m hopeful that it won’t be for long, largely because the Dems strategy isn’t just electing Democrats, but electing the right Democrats. When you look at how Dean’s 50-state strategy has played out so far (among many other things, using leftover resources to help down-ticket progressives, planting the seeds for future national runs), and factor in that it still has a ways to go, I feel things are looking good for a while. It’s worth noting that Dean completely upset the Democratic power structure in Washington when he took over the DNC. He’s kicking the established do-nothings to the curb, and the results are starting to come in. Hopeful, like I said.

    As for the Republicans—let ‘em wallow in their own uselessness. If the statements and comments from the Repubs and their Fox Snooze cheerleaders in the first few days after the election are any indicator, they haven’t learned any lessons from the last two elections. They’re utterly convinced the reason they lost is because they aren’t conservative enough. Somehow they have come to believe that most people think the same way they do, and everyone else are just “godless heathens” and not “real Americans.”

    They are nothing but a regional (Appalachian) party now, and there’s no indicator that they are going to change. It’s a bed they themselves made—they can lie in it.

  • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/daylightatheism Ebonmuse

    Well said, KShep. If you read Daily Kos, you know that the slogan of the netroots movement for the past few election cycles has been “More Democrats, Better Democrats.” Before we could make any real progress, we needed to break the Republican grip on power and throw them out of office. That’s been well and truly achieved now, which means it’s time for the next step: getting rid of the Democrats who have opposed real progressive change.

    There are plenty of good liberal Democratic officeholders, but the past two years they’ve been largely stymied by a corporatist faction within the party that often votes with Republicans (as we saw with the telecom immunity bill). The next phase of the progressive movement will be to replace these conservative obstructionists, mostly through primary challenges. The expulsion of Joe Lieberman from the party was a welcome first step, one that was more than validated by his subsequent behavior. Another example was the successful primary campaign waged against a corrupt, war-friendly and lobbyist-friendly representative named Al Wynn. (A good indicator of Wynn’s character is that, as soon as he was defeated in the primary, he immediately resigned from Congress to join a lobbyist firm rather than serve out the remainder of his term.) We can expect to see more of these in the future. The Democratic party as a whole still needs a lot of hammering into shape before it can truly call itself progressive, but we’re getting there.

  • Alex Weaver

    The expulsion of Joe Lieberman from the party was a welcome first step, one that was more than validated by his subsequent behavior. Another example was the successful primary campaign waged against a corrupt, war-friendly and lobbyist-friendly representative named Al Wynn. (A good indicator of Wynn’s character is that, as soon as he was defeated in the primary, he immediately resigned from Congress to join a lobbyist firm rather than serve out the remainder of his term.) We can expect to see more of these in the future. The Democratic party as a whole still needs a lot of hammering into shape before it can truly call itself progressive, but we’re getting there.

    I just hope the political will to throw out the rest of the Vichycrats doesn’t falter…

    And that Obama’s vote on the telecom bill was a political sacrifice to make sure he’d have the power to fix that and other problems in a more comprehensive fashion. That’s perfectly consident with my impression of him; I’m hoping not to be disappointed.

  • John

    Jesus, It sure is fun reading all these comments. Even though I would have preferred McCain, I am actually happy that Obama won. He is going to disappoint you, that is inevitable. I am fully supportive of BHOs presidency, and will not be moving to Canada, but do yourselves a favor, don’t hyperventilate over this. The pendulum swings back and forth. Shucks,(sounds like Palin, huh) Hillary could have beaten McCain. The popular vote margin should have been a lot more. I wish Obama the best – good luck trying to keep 300 million selfish people happy.

  • heliobates

    I am fully supportive of BHOs presidency, and will not be moving to Canada…

    Thank the Universal Unchanging Laws of Logic™ for that! Why, you alone would put the Conservative Party only 1.8 million votes shy of the popular majority of people who bothered to vote in this election! You don’t know how much sleep I’ve been losing over this, John.

    Scandanavia of the North™ lives to fight another day.

  • Christopher

    John,

    He is going to disappoint you, that is inevitable.

    He won’t disappoint me – I have no expectations of the bastard to begin with (or of his opponent McCain, for that matter…). I just voted Castle/Alucard out of protest against this worthless election!

  • corsair the pirate

    A little bit of hyperbole, perhaps?

    First, the historic: A nation built by slaves, that fought a bloody civil war over emancipation, and that has grappled with the poisonous legacy of racism since its founding, has chosen a black man to be its President.

    I think the nation was built by a whole lot of people, not just slaves. In fact, outside of the South there really were few slaves who had any kind of impact. And I know you aren’t implying that the country hasn’t been built at all since emancipation…

    Also, the country only peripherally fought a “bloody civil war over emancipation.”

    Don’t get me wrong, I think it is a fine thing that Obama won, especially since the Dems have most of the power and that will give them the opportunity to squander and piss it away on misguided laws, projects, and taxing and spending over the next 4 years. Unchecked power in anyone’s hands leads to disaster.

    In fact, I am all for just having the two parties swap the presidency and congress every four years to keep them honest.

  • John Nernoff

    Sarah Palin has been on TV practically every day since the election obviously engaging in a blatant self-promotion campaign. With every interview she proved to be an incessantly babbling motormouth discoursing on the most common platitudes, worst of which was her exultant faith-based silliness. God is going to guide her in what to do in 2012 and when He opens the door a crack she is going to push her way through it no matter what. I will enjoy catching glimpses of the development of this hyper-religious Barbie Doll, but not at the expense of missing anything from our wise President-elect.

  • lpetrich

    Remember when she claimed that God would do the right thing in this election? Does she really believe that God would fix that election?

    But given how big the Democrats won in it, is she willing to conclude that God wants Democrats to rule this nation? Complete with fixing the elections accordingly, of course.

    I’ve found some apolitical fundies, like the author of Should Christians VOTE? from the Restored Church of God, an offshoot of the Worldwide Church of God, an offshoot of General Conference of the Church of God (Seventh-Day), an offshoot of Seventh-Day Adventism, originally the Millerites.

    He claimed that voting is pointless because God fixes each and every election and other political contest, because politics is divisive and politicians power-hungry, that one should be a citizen of Jesus Christ’s kingdom and not any other, and that no leader in the Bible was ever elected.

  • bestonnet

    Ipetrich:

    Remember when she claimed that God would do the right thing in this election? Does she really believe that God would fix that election?

    Considering how many religious people seem to think God goes around rigging sporting events…

    Ipetrich:

    He claimed that voting is pointless because God fixes each and every election and other political contest, because politics is divisive and politicians power-hungry, that one should be a citizen of Jesus Christ’s kingdom and not any other, and that no leader in the Bible was ever elected.

    Pity all fundies aren’t like that, we’d have a lot less trouble if religious people could keep their delusions to themselves.

  • bbk

    Thanks for the reply, KShep. I do think that it’s important to have a better mix of politicians in political office and that Obama will have an impact here that will last beyond his presidency. However, that’s still not structural change.

    The biggest thing that tempers my hope for long term change are voters themselves. Historically, the only time a progressive government gets elected is when things are really, really bad. Voters are extremely risk averse. They’re not going to elect a platform of change if things are generally sort of okay. People will actually vote to the right of their own personal opinions because it feels safer that way. That’s exactly why Carter didn’t get re-elected, why the Republican Revolution happened, and the reason why Bush Jr got so close to winning the election after Clinton. Generally, conservatives don’t have to offer anything of substance to get elected – things just have to be going well enough for people’s risk averse nature to kick in.

    Structural change, therefore, is a type of change that can survive these inevitable changes in leadership and it is the only type of change that can sustain a progressive agenda. Progressives will only disappoint themselves if they hope that good leadership will be their savior.

  • KShep

    Historically, the only time a progressive government gets elected is when things are really, really bad.

    I would venture that this applies to anyone. You mentioned Carter’s loss to Reagan in ’80, the Republican Revolution of ’94, and Dubya “winning” in 2000. All of these occurred because the conservatives were convinced that things were really, really bad at the time.

    I guess to them it was, what with all those “other” people asserting their rights as Americans, demanding equal protection, etc. And don’t forget Clinton getting a BJ from an airheaded intern. Country’s been in the crapper ever since. Good thing the “fiscally responsible” Repubs swooped in to save the country with a 5-year, $40-plus-million “investigation” and subsequent impeachment.

    Snarkiness aside, I guess it just depends on what someone thinks is important. I still maintain that one big reason the Repubs are free-falling is because they rose to power using little more than scare tactics and imaginary boogeymen to frighten god-fearing bumpkins into voting for them. Nowadays, they’re running out of people to hate, and with fewer anti-gay measures on ballots around the country (because most states have already passed such measures), the bumpkins are staying home and letting the grownups choose the best candidates.

    And if you need any validation, look at some of the clowns that have been voted in by those bumpkins—-Saxby Chambliss, Sarah Palin, Michelle Bachmann, Rick Santorum, Tim Walberg, Sam Brownback, Mike Huckabee, Tom Delay, etc. etc.

    I could think of many more, but you get the picture. None of these morons are qualified to lead a boy scout troup, much less the USA.

  • Archi Medez

    “…Sarah Palin. She embodies all that the Republican party has become: a cheerful devotee of religious know-nothingism, aggressively ignorant, shamelessly bigoted, willing to pander to any prejudice or stir up any hatred in order to win.”

    Wow, seems like an excessive ad hominem attack on Palin. I don’t think those accusations are supported by the facts, except perhaps her stance on gay marriage, which is not much different than Obama’s view.

    “Especially with Palin in the ring, we can be confident that this contest will be defined by smear tactics and personal attacks.”

    From whom?

  • bestonnet

    Archi Medez:

    Wow, seems like an excessive ad hominem attack on Palin. I don’t think those accusations are supported by the facts, except perhaps her stance on gay marriage, which is not much different than Obama’s view.

    Then you think wrong.

    BTW: That contest was defined by smear tactics and personal attacks, from the wannabe theocrats.


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