Ark. Republican Legislator is Pro-Slavery

I’ve said for years that, as bad as Congress can be, if you really want to find the crazy you have to look at the state legislatures, where people like Warren Chisum, Chris Buttars, Sally Kern and Gerald Allen can be found. Add Loy Mauch, a Republican state legislator from Arkansas, to that list. He still thinks slavery is okay. Some excerpts from letters he’s written to the newspaper over the years:

The 14th Amendment completely destroyed the Founders’ concept of limited government and was coerced on this nation by radical people and in my opinion was never legally ratified as required by Article V of the Constitution. It was essentially a Karl Marx concept and would have never come from the pen of Madison or any of the patriots from Virginia.

Uh, wrong. In fact, James Madison wanted to apply the Bill of Rights to the states when those amendments were passed.

… If slavery were so God-awful, why didn’t Jesus or Paul condemn it, why was it in the Constitution and why wasn’t there a war before 1861?

The South has always stood by the Constitution and limited government. When one attacks the Confederate Battle Flag, he is certainly denouncing these principles of government as well as Christianity…

To those of us who actually know our history, Lee will be mentioned in the same breath as George Washington and Thomas Jefferson, while Goering will be equated with Lincoln, Josef Stalin and Karl Marx…

Nowhere in the Holy Bible have I found a word of condemnation for the operation of slavery, Old or New Testament. If slavery was so bad, why didn’t Jesus, Paul or the prophets say something?

This country already lionizes Wehrmacht leaders. They go by the names of Lincoln, Grant, Sherman, Sheridan, Custer, etc. These Marxists not only destroyed the Constitution they were sworn to uphold, but apostatized the word of God. Either these depraved infidels or the Constitution and Scriptures are in error. I’m more persuaded by the word of God…

I’m very proud my ancestors stood up to Northern aggression. The Confederate flag to me is not only a symbol of our brief period of independence and our loyalty to the 1789 Constitution, but also a symbol of Christian liberty vs. the new world order.

Despite all of this, the state’s Republican leaders continue to support Mauch’s reelection efforts. What a shock.

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  • http://www.electricminstrel.com Brett McCoy

    He’s only saying out loud what other people are secretly thinking. I am not surprised he is getting votes.

  • Michael Heath

    It’s ironic, and typical of conservative Christians in general, that he advocates for both limited government and liberty while simultaneously promoting government suppress the rights of those not considered one of the privileged set within his sect.

    One notion we need to promote more vociferously is that just because your religious beliefs references an objective morality which results in bigotry and other forms of unjust suppression and hatred, that standard doesn’t make the bigotry, hate, and bad behavior poof out of existence. It just means the standard of morality you’re using is defective by way of promoting bigotry.

  • cry4turtles

    Is it appropriate to guess he’s white?

  • hexidecima

    what an absolutely horrible little man. It shouldn’t suprise me so much when someone is this vile, but for good or bad, it does. Oh well, at least we know where they are and can expose them. And they do serve as such great examples when they do our work for us showing just how vile the bible really is.

    Pity that this man doesn’t realize that the Constitution isn’t the thing in error, he and his bible are.

  • Snoof

    Nowhere in the Holy Bible have I found a word of condemnation for the operation of slavery, Old or New Testament.

    He’s got that right, at least.

    This country already lionizes Wehrmacht leaders. They go by the names of Lincoln, Grant, Sherman, Sheridan, Custer, etc. These Marxists not only destroyed the Constitution they were sworn to uphold, but apostatized the word of God.

    Communists _and_ Nazis simultaneously? I’m surprised they weren’t also Satanist Muslim Homosexual Atheists too.

    It’s almost fascinating to see the way actual words are stripped of meaning and turned into slurs without any kind of context or nuance.

  • Captain Mike

    So Arkansas has Charles Fuqua, who wants to make it legal for parents to have their kids put to death, and Loy Mauch, who publicly endorses slavery. That’s a winning combo right there. Fuqua/Mauch in 2016!

  • M, Supreme Anarch of the Queer Illuminati

    he advocates for both limited government and liberty while simultaneously promoting government suppress the rights of those not considered one of the privileged set within his sect.

    Conservatives, Libertarians, etc. all agree that certain classes have an absolute right to rule over the less worthy; they just disagree in some of the details about who counts as one of the elect. They all agree that the wealthy are to be the overlords; most conservatives have stopped openly including “white” on their list of required traits to be a member of the ruling caste. For all the variations on rightist politics, though, “liberty” and “limited government” means nothing more or less than “lack of government interference with, or government facilitation of, the superior status and power of the naturally/divinely-ordained master caste.”

  • Chiroptera

    If slavery was so bad, why didn’t Jesus, Paul or the prophets say something?

    Funny. I could have sworn that contemporary Christians had a rationalization for this. Doesn’t he realize how awful he portrays his flavor of Christianity?

    Oh well. I can only assume he understands his audience.

    Captain Mike, #6: So Arkansas has Charles Fuqua, who wants to make it legal for parents to have their kids put to death, and Loy Mauch, who publicly endorses slavery.

    Add to this that they think the US should do whatever the hell it wants in foreign policy, it appears more and more that these clown’s preferred model for a Republic is that of ancient Rome.

  • http://accidental-historian.typepad.com/accidental-historian/ Geds

    Snoof @5: It’s almost fascinating to see the way actual words are stripped of meaning and turned into slurs without any kind of context or nuance.

    You mean like the way Wehrmacht is simply a German word for “armed forces” and has all of the ideological force as, say “navy?”

  • raven

    … If slavery were so God-awful, why didn’t Jesus or Paul condemn it,..

    Good question.

    The answer is that both men, if they even existed, were products of their time.

    Human ethics and morality evolve over time. Xians and their gods don’t usually lead. They follow. They frequently oppose any change or progress.

    The Southern Baptists were formed to support slavery long before the civil war. They opposed racial integration in the mid-20th century. They are still filled with racists. Like Loy Mauch and the majority of his district that voted for him.

  • raven

    Add Loy Mauch, a Republican state legislator from Arkansas, to that list. He still thinks slavery is okay.

    This is a testable claim.

    Someone should enslave Loy Mauch and sell him to one of the places in the world where slavery is still practiced. And then ask him how he liked it in a decade. Assuming he is still alive, and he probably wouldn’t be.

  • w00dview

    I knew it would happen eventually. I knew the GOP would swing so far to the right they would consider someone like Lincoln a “Marxist”. I wonder when will Rush Limbaugh started making fun of the guy by referring him as a bleeding heart liberal?

    How does the modern GOP feel about Teddy roosevelt, I wonder? Is he now considered an anti-business tree hugger? Or do they sweep his environmental past under the carpet?

  • Pierce R. Butler

    When one attacks the Confederate Battle Flag, he is certainly denouncing these principles of government as well as Christianity…

    Will someone with more photoshop skillz than me please whip up an image of Jesus dangling sadly from the Stars and Bars?

  • markr1957 (Patent Pending)

    He’s only saying out loud what other people are secretly thinking.

    It’s no secret down here (in Louisiana) what other white people are thinking – they might hold it in if there are any people of color within earshot, but in white-only company they don’t hold back, and they have no reservations about calling you a race traitor you if you don’t agree with them.

  • sunsangnim

    I’ve often heard conspiracy theories refer to the “new world order” but this is the first time I’ve heard “new” refer to 1865.

    And I thought it was bad that the GOP was turning the contraceptive debate back to the 1960s. By the 2016 election we should be debating the invention of fire.

  • anne mariehovgaard

    it appears more and more that these clown’s preferred model for a Republic is that of ancient Rome

    They might have a problem with the Romans’ ideas about acceptable (manly) behaviour with male slaves.

  • Sastra

    Well, it’s certainly nice to have a little break from the “without Christianity there would be no way to justify why anything is wrong” crowd.

  • http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    Come on, people! It takes real bravery for a man to stand up and advocate for something that wouldn’t effect him!

    (Also, remember that the parties now are the same as the parties were, because shut up, that’s why)

  • khms

    You mean like the way Wehrmacht is simply a German word for “armed forces” and has all of the ideological force as, say “navy?”

    Funny how Germans do not actually use “Wehrmacht” to mean “armed forces”, though.

    Quoting Wikipedia:

    The Wehrmacht (German pronunciation: [ˈveːɐ̯maxt] ( listen) (Armed Forces)—from German: wehren, to defend and Macht, power, force, cognate to English might) was the unified armed forces of Germany from 1935 to 1945. It consisted of the Heer (army), the Kriegsmarine (navy) and the Luftwaffe (air force).

    These days, it’s the Bundeswehr consisting of Heer, Marine, and Luftwaffe; before Hitler, it was the Reichswehr. Wehrmacht only ever refers to the Nazi version.

  • http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    Ah, German. The language of love. It’s the chocolate of language; the sweet way it clings to the lips, rolls around on the tongue, um, grunts and yells…

    Everything conversation in German sounds like both people are getting a cramp during sex.

  • jnorris

    Captain Mike in #6 gives us our next political bumper sticker: Fuck/Much in 2016!

    Is it too late to sell Arkansas back to the French?

  • Michael Heath

    Christian bigot:

    If slavery was so bad, why didn’t Jesus, Paul or the prophets say something?

    Chiroptera writes:

    Funny. I could have sworn that contemporary Christians had a rationalization for this. Doesn’t he realize how awful he portrays his flavor of Christianity?

    If one of your premises is that the Bible is the inerrant word of God, which I assume this Christian believes, then he’s got an argument. An inerrant reading of the Bible as the word of God has God either promoting or condoning slavery, even after the New Covenant.

    However, that same inerrantist argument requires an honest and competent thinker who is aware of this fact to then concede their god is either evil for their promotion of slavery and other obviously evil acts, or an incompetent fool for having to switch to a morally tenable postion while failing miserably to communicate such in the Bible. When we bring other logical conundrums into the mix, we find both of these characteristics, evil and incompetence, are not mutually exclusive when it comes to describing the biblical god(s) in its/their full context.

  • Doug Little

    If slavery were so God-awful, why didn’t Jesus or Paul condemn it,

    There’s your problem, setting the morality bar way, way too low.

  • Michael Heath

    If slavery were so God-awful, why didn’t Jesus or Paul condemn it,..

    Raven responds:

    Good question.

    The answer is that both men, if they even existed, were products of their time.

    While both are fair game when we presume the Bible is the inerrant word of God, if we don’t than I don’t think it’s fair to assess either man by the documents which survive, particularly Jesus.

    We don’t even know if the Jesus character in the Bible existed, let alone what he said or thought about anything. He could very well have existed and his words are contained in for example, the first layer of Quelle coming from a Nazerite (not a Nazarene), which is what I think is the most reasonable hypothesis. But a lot of what is put in Jesus’ mouth can be safely assumed to have come from later authors and editors. Plus there’s what’s not contained in the Bible if such a man or conglomeration of men existed.

    And while we do have copies of letters from Paul that are most likely fairly representative of what he wrote, though not necessarily entirely accurate, we probably don’t have the full set of what we wrote. And then there’s the editors, many with an agenda during a time where historical accuracy was not a concern with nearly all writers of that time.

    Consider how current religionists deny the reality of what’s currently going on or misconstrue our history now. Do we really think religious scholars living 20 to 1600 years after the supposed death of Jesus Christ behaved better than the extant religionists of today when it comes to describing historical events? I certainly don’t in spite of thinking the people of old in this line of work were far more intelligent and open minded than the religionists of today, simply because they have any as many lines of opportunities to do thoughtful work. The weakness then was the lack of formal critical thinking processes and standards when it comes to developing publications along with the same old need to submit to authorities who have objectives other than truth.

  • Nemo

    So, slavery = liberty.

    And ignorance is strength.

  • Skip White

    Ah yes, another good ol’ boy who somehow thinks that several states seceding and attempting to create their own separate country meant they just loved the Constitution so much.

  • tim rowledge, Ersatz Haderach

    Is it too late to sell Arkansas back to the French?

    I’m not sure even the Le Penis-ts would take it.