HRC on Lively’s Bigoted Legacy

The Human Rights Campaign released a report about the history of Scott Lively’s anti-gay crusade this week, including both his advocacy of brutal anti-gay legislation around the world and his history of making the most bizarre accusations against gay people imaginable.

According to the well documented report, Lively describes being gay as a “personality disorder” and his struggle against equality as “a war” in which only one side can prevail, but perhaps his most offensive belief is that gay men were the cause of the Holocaust and the Rwandan genocide.

In the U.S., Lively is largely considered a fringe extremist, even by other anti-LGBT activists, but he has never been content to spread extremism and hate at home. He first traveled to Uganda in 2002 to warn about the LGBT menace to that country and he returned in 2009 to headline a conference on “the dangers of homosexuality.” Many Ugandan activists believe that he was one of the inspirations for the harsh anti-homosexuality bill that was enacted in 2014, which punishes same sex intimacy with penalties that can include life in prison.

Lively has also been a frequent visitor to Eastern Europe, where he spent months in 2006-2007 on a 50-city tour of the former Soviet Union. Wherever he goes, Lively presents himself as a world renowned expert on LGBT issues and urges policymakers to pass laws that crack down on LGBT rights and the right of free expression. Lively takes personal credit for the passage of the Russian “gay propaganda” law, which he says he proposed back in 2007.

Probably worth reading the whole thing.

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  • marcus

    When I saw the word “legacy” I thought maybe he was dead. I am reluctant to wish for anyone’s untimely death, but considering that Lively works actively to help enact legislation designed to either take or destroy the lives of innocent people, let’s just say I wouldn’t lose any sleep…

  • teawithbertrand

    @ marcus

    Come to think of it, I’d much rather live in a world with a dead Scott Lively and a living Fred Phelps. Lively has a real and terrible influence on the laws of places like Uganda, and I recently heard Phelps described as the Bull Conner of the gay rights movement.

  • sugarfrosted

    @2 teawithbertrand

    I don’t think he really filled the same roll as Bull Conner, because Bull Conner actually had power and Phelps was just a hateful rabble rouser that hurt one of my friends. (They protested at her school after her friend killed themselves.) Sure it was shocking, but they were so outside of the mainstream, which at the time Bull Conner was not, and lacked any real power that I don’t see how that comparison could possibly work.

  • teawithbertrand

    @ sugarfrosted

    I can’t remember where I saw the comment, but I think the point was that the over-the-top spectacle of Phelps’s antics did a lot to engender sympathy and support for the gay community among the mainstream, much like Conner’s fire hoses and police dogs did for African American demonstrators in Birmingham.