SC Republican Wants to End Public Schools

The cavalcade of extremist candidates running as Republicans around the country continues to roll down the street. Ray Moore, a Republican candidate for Lt. Governor of South Carolina, says he wants to eliminate public schools entirely. Why? Because they’re not in the Bible.

Ray Moore, a retired Army Reserves chaplain and president of Frontline Ministries, sketched out his plan for dismantling public education in the U.S. on Wednesday’s edition of The Janet Mefferd Show.

He has encouraged Christian families to withdraw their children from public schools and educate them at home or enroll them in religious schools, and he believes the tipping point would occur at about 25 percent to 35 percent of the total K-12 population.

“Then the states would then negotiate, perhaps taking out of their constitution platform, or the provision, that says the state had to provide education, and it would gradually be handed over to churches, families, and private associations,” Moore said. “That’s the way it was for the first 200 years of American history.”…

“We’ve got to go back to the original biblical model, which is Christian education and home education, and go back to the original American model. I think we do that, it would follow my theme of my campaign, which is: What once was, can be again” Moore said, rhyming the last word with “rain.”…

“The scriptures teach this model, this is a biblical model, we don’t see anything in the Bible about state education, and it’s done as an outreach of the Christian community,” Moore said.

Oi. Such ignorance. No, that is not the way it was for the first 200 years of American history. In fact, most states began creating public schools immediately after the revolution. In 1785, John Adams encouraged the creation of public schools across the country:

“The whole people must take upon themselves the education of the whole people and be willing to bear the expenses of it. There should not be a district of one mile square, without a school in it, not founded by a charitable individual, but maintained at the public expense of the people themselves.”

And it’s true that public schools are not mentioned in the Bible. You know what else isn’t mentioned? Computers. Or lt. governors. Or vaccination. Or antibiotics. Or running water. Or South Carolina, for that matter. In fact, the list of things we have today that are not mentioned in the Bible is virtually limitless.

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  • sqlrob

    FTFA: “He said non-religious schools, which he has called “the Pharaoh’s schools,” posed an existential threat to Christians.”

    Can’t say he’s wrong here. Education can do wonders for ignorance.

  • eric

    I don’t recall “running for Lt. Governor” being in the bible either. So maybe he should stop doing that.

  • tsig

    When it comes to education Moore is less.

  • tsig

    Stoning and crucifixion are in the bible so we need to change the method of execution.

  • Mr Ed

    While the Bible doesn’t use the word governor it does mention one, Pontius Pilate. I guess if it is in the bible it must be good.

  • matty1

    He may be counting American history from the first European settlement rather than from independence. I doubt there were many non religious schools under the puritans.

  • Chiroptera

    “Then the states would then negotiate, perhaps taking out of their constitution platform, or the provision, that says the state had to provide education, and it would gradually be handed over to churches, families, and private associations,” Moore said. “That’s the way it was for the first 200 years of American history.”…

    Or perhaps this would end up showing the foolishness of the idea of general “religious exemptions” and the states will end up putting in place very strict standards over how people are allowed to educate their children outside the public school setting.

    I think most people were fine with religious exemptions when it was a relatively few people invoking for a relatively few circumstances. But the current over-reach of the Religious Right trying to seemingly get out of every single obligation and responsibility that other peole take for granted is going to end up souring the public on the idea.

  • Alverant

    The Bible also doesn’t encourage people voting for their leaders or freedom of religion. It’s no surprise the GOP is against that too.

  • D. C. Sessions

    In fact, the list of things we have today that are not mentioned in the Bible is virtually limitless.

    One thing at a time, Ed.

  • raven

    Religion thrives when people are poverty stricken and ignorant.

    So some xians want everyone to be poverty stricken and ignorant again so their fading religion has another chance.

    It would mean the end of the USA though, at least as a world power. We can’t run a modern nation with a population of near illiterate, poverty stricken bible bangers.

  • Mr Ed

    Matty #6

    Connecticut had an 1650 law requiring towns of 50 families to hire a school master and towns of 100 to build a school. This was done in part to encourage biblical literacy and in part for economics. men needed to be able to read and understand their property deeds.

  • kantalope

    Boston Latin School founded in 1635 for reference…

  • dugglebogey

    The truth is he doesn’t want to end public schools because they’re not in the bible. He wants to end public schools because the bible is not in THEM. As in the full curriculum.

  • doublereed

    But Republicans aren’t anti-intellectual of course not

  • alanb

    He may be counting American history from the first European settlement rather than from independence. I doubt there were many non religious schools under the puritans.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boston_Latin_School

  • raven

    McCrory Education Policies Result in Mass Exodus of NC teachers…

    www. politicususa. com/…/mccrory-education-policies-result-mass-exodus…‎

    Apr 18, 2014 – HOME · Sports · ALL TIME POPULAR POSTS · Proof of the GOP War on Women … Teachers are among North Carolina’s low income wage earners. … Clearly, in the name of ridding North Carolina of a public education system, … 42 Responses to Republican Governor’s Education Policies Result in Mass …

    There does seem to be one state where, rather than some lunatic fringer trying to abolish public schools, it is the governor. It’s North Carolina, right next to Ray Moore’s state.

    It’s gotten to the point where teachers are demoralized and quiting a lot.

  • illdoittomorrow

    Tsig at 4,

    “Stoning and crucifixion are in the bible so we need to change the method of execution.”

    Now that you mention it, neither are firearms. Mentioning that to your friendly neighbourhood Christianist might lead to some amusing head asplosion action.

  • sigurd jorsalfar

    “It would mean the end of the USA though, at least as a world power. We can’t run a modern nation with a population of near illiterate, poverty stricken bible bangers.”

    No no no, Raven. The USA would be more powerful than ever because God would be back on its side.

  • D. C. Sessions

    But Republicans aren’t anti-intellectual of course not

    Republicans may not be anti-intellectual, but it’s a sure bet that anti-intellectuals are Republicans.

  • eric

    @13 – yep, I think you win the thread. Though I think there is a ‘let them eat cake’ aspect to this too: he doesn’t realize or doesn’t care that a lot of poor people would not have the resources to adequately educate their kids in an ‘all private’ system. In fact one could argue that the whole point of publicly funded education is to ensure that the folk who can’t afford it nevertheless get it.

  • raven

    quotes from polticususa article edited for length

    The McCrory Administration brought in many education “reforms” that only the Tea Party could love. While courting charter schools with the public purse, McCrory slashed the public education budget with predictable results.

    Classes are larger and teachers’ workloads have increased, But NC teachers haven’t had a significant pay raise in five years. McCrory also removed supplemental pay for advanced degrees, which amounts to penalizing teachers for improving their qualifications. Moreover, pay raises only apply to teachers in the first year. Then there are the indirect costs, such as increasing taxes on the middle and poverty wage classes to pay for the tax cuts McCrory gave the richest families in North Carolina.

    Teachers are among North Carolina’s low income wage earners.

    WUNC, reports 600 teachers have left their jobs in Wake County – since July 2013. That’s an alarming increase of 41% from last year.

    McCrory slashed the public education budget, funneled lots of money to “charter schools” that are mostly religious schools, and attacked the teachers any way he could.

    In one school district alone, 600 teachers quit in one year.

    The good thing from a GOP perspective is that mistreating children by not educating them won’t show up as social problems and poverty for a decade or two. Then they can blame it on Democrats, atheists, gays, women, and Moslems.

  • anubisprime

    Jeebus sunbeams have just realized that education controlled by non-theist standards is very bad for their recruitment into their delusion.

    So force the education system into their path by dismantling the public school system!

    After all they need someone numerate enough to count their donations and literate enough to design their billboards.

  • shouldbeworking

    I think the GOP’s view on public education is: “The only education the children of the 47% need is enough literacy to read the shift schedule so they can show up to work on time, if they ever get a job.”

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    You know, I’d figure that someone from North America wouldn’t be so quick to eliminate things that aren’t in the bible.

  • Thorne

    There’s nothing in the bible about driving motor vehicles, either, so I guess this clown better climb out of his Bronco and start riding his ass to church.

  • brucegee1962

    Thomas Jefferson’s plan in founding the University of Virginia was to provide free higher education to all the top students in the state, regardless of their wealth or poverty. He was extremely disappointed that he couldn’t talk the legislature back then into paying for his plan.

  • cry4turtles

    Just think of the snowball effect: the uneducated educating the uneducated.

  • caseloweraz

    The motto of the Frontline Ministries Web site is: “Taking Every Thought Captive.” That fits right in with what Ray Moore is saying.

    Also, the site is supported partly by ads for printed books and the Amazon Kindle. And this is interesting: The FB page of their church in San Jose, CA held a party in March for UFC 171 (Hendricks Vs Lawler), which is apparently some sort of cage match. “The Frontline Ministry will be hosting UFC 171 tomorrow night at 7pm! Feel free to bring refreshments to share with everyone! *This is a Pay-Per-View event so a donation of $5 per person is suggested.*”

    I’m sure that neither printed books nor televised prizefights were mentioned in the Bible.

    However, a case might be made for the Kindle:

    “Everyone will see that I the Lord have kindled it…” (Ezekiel 20:48)

  • http://www.gregory-gadow.net Gregory in Seattle

    Automobiles aren’t in the Bible, either. Nor is Viagra. Nor is indoor plumbing. So, presumably…?

  • lofgren

    Hey guys! Race you to the bottom!

  • D. C. Sessions

    In fact one could argue that the whole point of publicly funded education is to ensure that the folk who can’t afford it nevertheless get it.

    And that’s always been one of the most popular reasons to get rid of it.

  • matty1

    I stand corrected, he is just an idiot

  • greg1466

    He has encouraged Christian families to withdraw their children from public schools and educate them at home or enroll them in religious schools

    Couple this with the idea that you have to be able to pass a state run basic competency exam in order to vote and we could solve a lot of problems.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    greg1466 “Couple this with the idea that you have to be able to pass a state run basic competency exam in order to vote and we could solve a lot of problems.”

    You’re assuming you’re in the majority. Now ponder what will happen if you are not. Clear now?

  • greg1466

    Modusoperandi“You’re assuming you’re in the majority. Now ponder what will happen if you are not. Clear now?”

    I’m not assuming I’m in the majority on any particular issue. I’m simply assuming that it would be beneficial to society if a person had to demonstrate a basic level of education and awareness of reality before being allowed to vote. Kind of like passing a drivers test.

  • lpetrich

    Democracy isn’t in the Bible, whether direct or representative. Legislative councils aren’t in the Bible either. In fact, the main forms of government in it are absolute monarchy and theocracy.

  • busterggi

    Can I take it that Mr. Moore made his statements in Hebrew, Aramaic or Greek? Because the bible doesn’t mention the English language.

  • iknklast

    start riding his ass to church

    This brought up an image that will keep me chuckling all day.

  • lorn

    What both disheartens, and encourages, me is the obvious point that most of the people claiming to use the Bible have stopped even trying to square their preferences with what is really in the Bible. The claim that something is Biblical is now, for the most part, just code for things they believe, things they want you to believe, things they are willing to use force to comply with, whether you believe or not. The Bible is rapidly becoming a fetish, a talisman, an object of symbolic power which is waved about to placate unsettled spirits without reference or concern with contents of the book or internal logic.

  • teele

    This is an issue that I am passionate about. Like Ed, I live in Michigan, a state that allows you to take your children out of school and claim to be homeschooling them, with no oversight of any kind. No yearly testing to make sure they are keeping up with other students, no home visits to make sure that educational materials are present and children are actually being educated. Nothing.

    I have known several people (all Bornagins, except one) who have “homeschooled” their children, and in each case the results have been disastrous. The kids are used as babysitters for younger children, or allowed to wander about town aimlessly during school hours (the parent using local shopkeepers as unpaid babysitters). One of my friends has a neighbor who will be pulling her daughter out of school at the end of this year, and not allowing her to go to high school. The neighbor woman is a religious crazy who makes pin money taking in foster children, and she needs her oldest girl at home to take care of them for her.

    Depriving children of education is disgusting, selfish, mean, and short-sighted. Someone above pointed out that the real cost of an uneducated population may not show up for a couple of decades; but for the folks who have taken their kids out of school, and who are against “big gummint,” the real cost to them may be the fact that their ignorant kids will not be able to help them out when they get old and don’t have any SS or Medicare.

  • raven

    I have known several people (all Bornagins, except one) who have “homeschooled” their children, and in each case the results have been disastrous.

    1. Here too. I’ve seen two kids homeschooled, oddly enough not by fundies but by New Agers. Both kids were of at least normal intelligence.

    One kid could barely read at age 18. The other could read at a third grade level. They struggled as adults to get and keep jobs and one is now dead of a drug overdose.

    These kids were set up to fail and then went out and…failed.

    2. Disclaimer!!! Homeschooling is like anything, it can be done well or badly. At least 40% of homeschoolers aren’t weird fundie xians setting up their kids to fail in life.

    But quite often homeschooling = minimal schooling.

  • raven

    and claim to be homeschooling them, with no oversight of any kind….

    That is true de facto everywhere.

    In this era of tight budgets, the police and school districts don’t have the personnel or money to keep track of all the kids in the area. If the kids are being “homeschooled”, no one is going to know or care how well or even if they are.

    It’s the same with the so called charter or private xian schools. In most cases, they don’t do standardized achievement tests so no one has the slightest idea what they are teaching or how well. And, in many cases, these aren’t very good.

  • D. C. Sessions

    Couple this with the idea that you have to be able to pass a state run basic competency exam in order to vote and we could solve a lot of problems.

    We used to do that. It was called a “literacy test” and the results were remarkably dependent on things like skin color.

    And you want it back?

  • EnlightenmentLiberal
    But Republicans aren’t anti-intellectual of course not

    Republicans may not be anti-intellectual, but it’s a sure bet that anti-intellectuals are Republicans.

    Reminds me of one of my favorite quotes by my hero JS MIll:

    I did not mean that Conservatives are generally stupid; I meant, that stupid persons are generally Conservative. I believe that to be so obvious and undeniable a fact that I hardly think any hon. Gentleman will question it.

  • greg1466

    We used to do that. It was called a “literacy test” and the results were remarkably dependent on things like skin color.

    And you want it back?

    I didn’t suggest that it would be easy to implement.

  • greg1466

    Reminds me of one of my favorite quotes by my hero JS MIll:

    I did not mean that Conservatives are generally stupid; I meant, that stupid persons are generally Conservative. I believe that to be so obvious and undeniable a fact that I hardly think any hon. Gentleman will question it.

    Oh I disagree. Stupidity knows no ideological or political boundaries.