NC Republicans: Rainbow Flags Just Like Nazi Flags

The city council in Asheville, North Carolina voted unanimously to hang a rainbow flag on city hall for National Coming Out Day on Saturday and two local Republican leaders want you to know that this is just like flying a Nazi flag on city hall. Because that’s a totally reasonable thing to say.

The donated flag was flown from City Hall Thursday as same-sex couples and advocates in North Carolina waited for a court ruling on gay marriage.

Former City Councilman Carl Mumpower and Chad Nesbitt, a former chairman of the Buncombe County GOP, said council violated state open meetings law by not holding vote during an official meeting in public.

“There is a reason that North Carolina instructs local elected bodies to handle their affairs in an open and deliberative way,” Nesbitt and Mumpower said in a statement. “Otherwise, they would be free, such as in this case, to indulge their personal feelings and conduct business behind closed doors and over private phone lines.”

Municipalities in California have raised pride flags at City Hall and those actions were controversial as well.

Nesbitt and Mumpower in their statement included a depiction of a Nazi flag flying from City Hall.

“I am equating their methods with the Nazi movement,” Mumpower said. “They are indifferent to the rule of law and indifferent to the vote of the people. And that’s Adolph Hitler all over again in a different disguise.”

It’s true. I think we all remember that before Hitler killed millions of Jews and hundreds of thousands of gay people, he first flew a rainbow flag from the Reichstag without allowing enough time for public comment. Historians point to that flag as the pivotal moment in the development of the Third Reich.

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What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • chilidog99

    Off topic rant:

    I really hate trying to browse this site on an iPhone.

  • D. C. Sessions

    I so wish someone would ask how they feel about a Confederate flag in the same place.

  • Loqi

    @DC

    The Confederate flag is okay because it’s just ceremonial deism.

    Wait, wrong bullshit argument.

  • matty1

    In my utopia flags will be meaningless decorations rather than something important.

  • John Pieret

    indifferent to the vote of the people

    There may have been a technical violation of N.C.’s open meetings law (I haven’t bothered to look it up), but that is not the same as being indifferent to the vote of the people. The public doesn’t get to vote at open city council meeting, just the right to to comment. Given that the vote was unanimous (and what it says about the politics of the city electorate) comments by bigots weren’t likely to change anything.

    Far more troubling is that a former city councilman and former chairman of the county GOP don’t know the basics of the city’s government.

  • Uncle Ebeneezer

    And we all know how tolerant those Nazis were of homosexuals.

  • Onamission5

    Why, it’s almost like Mumpower can’t tell the difference between a symbol of oppression and a symbol of equality, and is prone to confabulation. That’s really weird coming from someone with his nose so far up the Tea Party’s butt that he can see out their collective eyeballs. /sarcasm

  • colnago80

    Re Uncle Ebeneezer @ #5

    They were tolerant until the Night of the Long Knives in 1934.

  • Kevin Kehres

    No, Carl, we’re not indifferent to the vote of the people.

    We’re dismissive of it. Just as we would be if the people somehow voted to deny right-wing hacks like you the basic liberties outlined in the Constitution.

  • Crimson Clupeidae

    I’ve played enough video games to know just how important flags are! You put your flag on a planet, and it is yours!!

  • Crimson Clupeidae

    See also: Eddie Izzard’s commentary on flags. 😉

  • vmanis1

    colnago80 @ 8:

    They were tolerant until the Night of the Long Knives in 1934.

    I don’t know whether this is intended to be snark or to be `factual’ (remember, it is of supreme importance to colnago that Adolf Hitler be called `Frankenberry’ or `Schmützipoopo’). In the latter case, he is factually wrong.

    The official Nazi view on homosexuality, as stated by the Party, was:

    It is not necessary that you and I live, but it is necessary that the German people live. And it can live if it can fight, for life means fighting. And it can only fight if it maintains its masculinity. It can only maintain its masculinity if it exercises discipline, especially in matters of love. Free love and deviance are undisciplined. Therefore, we reject you, as we reject anything which hurts our people.

    Anyone who even thinks of homosexual love is our enemy.

    Indeed, the Night of The Long Knives was claimed to be a “crackdown” on homosexuality, but the fact was that Ernst Röhm had been useful to Hitler before, but now was seen as a danger, in that he was amassing power (source: Shirer, among others). While it is most definitely true that there were gay Nazis, Hitler `tolerated’ them so long as they were convenient, and then disposed of them promptly thereafter.

    If colnago80’s comment was intended as snark, then he should learn to do better snark.

  • vmanis1

    I should mention, apropos my previous comment, that the Nazi statement I quoted was issued in 1928, during the discussion of the proposal to amend, repeal, or at least ameliorate the notorious Paragraph 175 of the German Penal Code, which banned (male, I think) homosexual acts. The Night of the Long Knives occurred in June, 1934.

    1928 came before 1934.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    colnago80 “They were tolerant until the Night of the Long Knives in 1934.”

    Wrong. It wasn’t “The Night of Long Knives”, it was “The night of long knii-iiives!”. Poor Rip was purged from the Party shortly after.

  • Chiroptera

    He has a point. Contemporary gay rights activism is just like the how the Nazis came to power. Only instead of Nazi street thugs beating up members of the other parties and disrupting their meetings and rallies, gay activists make reasoned arguments in courts of law and are successful in convincing the majority in society that they are decent law abiding citizens and should have the same rights as other citizens. But other than that, they are exactly the same.

  • http://www.pandasthumb.org Area Man

    The Nazis were just as obsessed over issues of manhood, and the irrational fear of being emasculated, as today’s conservatives are. Same pathology.

  • lorn

    It is ridiculous but they are playing off a common meme, that Hitler operated outside the law and was a radical in doing so.

    Hitler’s initial foray into political actions were violations of law but after his incarceration he was very careful thereafter to color inside the lines while distorting the system toward his ends. Hitler was very much concerned with doing everything within the law to help maintain his legitimacy. He was all about lawfulness and rule of law, and was quite careful to operate within the system while changing the system to a form more to his advantage.

    Hitler was many things. A monster and irrational fool willing to destroy huge swaths of humanity to further his dreams. And when the dream was no longer possible he demanded Germany destroy itself as a monument to his megalomania. But, except for his early years, he was a big believer in law and the rule of law.

  • dingojack

    Oh I see — lawful evil alignment.

    :) Dingo

  • Pierce R. Butler

    lorn @ # 17: Hitler’s initial foray into political actions were violations of law but after his incarceration he was very careful thereafter to color inside the lines while distorting the system toward his ends. Hitler was very much concerned with doing everything within the law to help maintain his legitimacy. He was all about lawfulness and rule of law, and was quite careful to operate within the system while changing the system to a form more to his advantage.

    Eh? Hitler himself very carefully kept out of jail following his release from Landsberg, but his party thugs stayed bloody-knuckled all along. The attack on a group of German Communists which eventually resulted in Horst Wessel’s martyrdom occurred in 1929, for example.

    And they didn’t keep this covert, either.

    The well-publicized image of the SA-man with a bandaged head, a stirring reminder of his combat against the “Marxists” (along with other portrayals of muscular, oversized storm troopers), became standard in party propaganda. In the first eight months of 1932, the Nazis claimed that seventy “martyrs” had fallen in battle against the enemy. [From State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda , by Steven Luckert and Susan Bachrach, quoted by David Niewert, including image described.]

  • dingojack

    Hitler was very much concerned with doing everything within the law to help maintain his legitimacy…”

    NSDAP ≠ Hitler.

    Reading comprehension failure?

    Dingo

  • http://www.pandasthumb.org Area Man

    But, except for his early years, he was a big believer in law and the rule of law.

    I’m not so sure about that. The concept of Führerprinzip was that the Führer himself was completely above the law. Whatever he said was the law. No doubt he was a fan of the rule-of-law for other people, but that meant his own diktats.

  • dingojack

    Sorry, my post above was aimed (poorly as it happens) at Pierce R. Butler who seems to have confused Hitler’s personal actions (as addressed by lorn above) with the propaganda produced by the political party he lead.

    Dingo

  • dingojack

    Area Man – “Hitler was very much concerned with doing everything within the law to help maintain his legitimacy. He was all about lawfulness and rule of law, and was quite careful to operate within the system while changing the system to a form more to his advantage.”

    Dingo

  • Pierce R. Butler

    dingojack @ #s 20 & 22 – Dunno how you read lorn’s # 17 – “… he [Hitler] was very careful thereafter to color inside the lines …” as necessarily restricted only to personal actions with the party of which AH declared himself the embodiment as a wholly distinct entity.

    I don’t have the time to go dig through the multiple biographies on my shelf to find the exact quotation, but IIRC Hitler did indeed participate in some burgerbrau bust-ups after the Beerhall Putsch fiasco – always flanked by a pair of muscle-men assigned to assure he acquired no unsightly bruises along the way.

  • eric

    What I find most absurd is that the comparison with the Nazis is made because (they say) the council didn’t hold an open meeting to decide whether to fly the flag. The council didn’t pass any legislation about gay marriage or anything, this is all just about flying a rainbow flag for a day.

    Now I’m all for open government but as decisions go, this is so trivial that it wouldn’t really bother me even if the decision was something I objected to. Had they voted to fly a Confederate or even an honest-to-God Nazi flag, I probably would’ve complained about the wisdom of their decision, but I wouldn’t be complaining about the fact they voted to do so without the public present.