OMG! Frozen is Emasculating Men!

I’ve never seen the movie Frozen (I don’t have kids, so I never will), but I had no idea how badly the movie is apparently destroying the male ego. I’ve been emasculated and I didn’t even know it, according to Steve Doocy, the dumbest man on television, and Penny Nance of Concerned Women for America.

“It’s not just Disney, I mean it’s Hollywood in general has often sent the message that men are superfluous, that they’re stupid, that they’re in the way, and that if they contribute anything to a family it’s a paycheck. And that is not true.”…

“We want [our boys] to know that they are essential. We want to raise heroes. We want to raise real men that will stick in their families and be great dads.”

Don’t I know it! Because if there’s one thing the movies never have, it’s men as heroes, amirite? Why, what happened to the good old days when we had movie heroes like John Wayne, an alcoholic who dodged the draft for World War II and cheated on all three of his wives? Those were the days of real masculine role models, I tell ya.

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  • dan4

    John Wayne didn’t dodge the draft.

  • regexp

    I may of missed the memo but when did it start that you have to have kids to go see a movie?

  • regexp

    @dan4

    Wayne went out of his way to avoid the war effort including ignoring letters and outright lying to his local draft board. The evidence is rather clear on this.

  • cottonnero

    My back of the envelope analysis: there are five human male characters with lines: the well-meaning but ineffectual father, the ill-meaning but ineffectual Duke of Weselton, the well-meaning and effectual Kristof, the (spoiler alert) ill-meaning and effectual Hans, and the shopkeeper Oaken, who is a bit of everything. Seems pretty fair to me.

  • http://giliellthinkingaloud.blogspot.com/ Giliell, professional cynic -Ilk-

    Not to forget the well-meaning snowman Olaf and the well-meaning smart reindeer Sven and the well-meaning troll Grampaddy. Not to mention all the male officials and servants and guards… Seriously, while Frozen is a princess movie it still has an overwhelmingly male cast.

  • http://Reallyawakeguy.blogspot.com somnus

    If only Frozen had a positive male role model. Perhaps someone who is hard-working, kind to animals, brave, practical, capable of loving someone and earning their love in return…

    Oh yeah, it *does* have that character. He’s just (horror of horrors) not the central focus of the story.

  • dingojack

    “… and that if they contribute anything to a family it’s a paycheck…”

    I thought ‘working hard & being a good provider’ was the very staple of American masculinity in the movies/sitcoms from the ’50s. I guess The Concerned Woman of America had them emasculated while we weren’t watching…

    😉 Dingo.

  • okstop

    Movies are usually more enjoyed without kids, I think. And this one is great.

  • kosk11348

    “We want [our boys] to know that they are essential. We want to raise heroes.”

    More and more, I am becoming to see the word “hero” as a red flag. It’s often used to put a positive spin on violence. I mean, if Chris Kyle is a “hero,” then I definitely do not want to see “our boys” raised with the same values. Reminds me of a quote I read recently…

    “So you love war. I used to think you were a decent man. But I see now I was mistaken. You’re a hero.”

    ― Joe Abercrombie, The Heroes

  • raven

    “We want [our boys] to know that they are essential. We want to raise heroes.”

    More and more, I am becoming to see the word “hero” as a red flag.

    I put the word “hero” into the Google fundie xian Newspeak to English translator.

    1. Hero i.e cannon fodder as in He was a real hero, too bad he was killed by an IED.

    2. Hater. He is a heroic xian since he cut the brake lines of a gay couple’s car.

    3. Babbling idiot. Glenn Beck is a real hero to the xians.

    They’ve been reading their instruction manual, Orwell’s 1984 again.

  • sundoga

    “We want to raise heroes.”

    Then why have a problem with Frozen? The male character on screen for the longest period stands by his friends, stands by his (adopted) family, helps strangers in need, and does everything in his power to help things turn out for the best. He might not be the film’s focus, but he’s certainly hero material.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    I thought the same thing when I watched Frozen. But then I let it go.

  • caseloweraz

    Ahhh, Modus beat me to the punch line again.

    But seriously, did these people freak out over Disney’s Mulan? Wait until they get wind of Adam’s Curse by Bryan Sykes.

  • gshelley

    I think it’s possible it isn’t the “lack” of male characters they object to, but that in the end, Anna solves her problem without male help

  • my2cents

    With all the dopey dad tropes in commercials and many TV shows that annoy me, I never once felt that way about Frozen. While the dumb dad thing usually does bother me there is no War on men just like there is no war on christianity.

    PS great joke Modus you never let us down with your humor.

  • caseloweraz

    After watching that video, I have a frivolous question: Has anyone ever seen Penny Nance and Michelle Bachmann in the same place?

  • DukeOfOmnium

    Of course, that good-hearted, ruggedly handsome wood cutter is kind of a dim bulb. If only Hollywood would show women who were fatuous and gullible! Then the war against men would cease!

  • opposablethumbs

    Via tumblr:

    Men: If Orange is the New Black is so good with representation, why are all the men horrible?

    Women: They’re not all horrible. Bennett’s nice. What more do you want?

    Men: But he’s clueless and irresponsible! And that’s just ONE guy! How can you give me ONE decent male character in a slew of diverse female characters and call THAT representation?

    Women:

    Women:

    Women:

    Women:

    Women:

    Women:

    Women: … must be tough.

  • Nice Ogress

    Well, it could be worse. Disney could have used the original plot.

  • cptdoom

    Emasculated? Would they care to tell these guys that?

    US Marines Watch Frozen & Sing Let It Go: http://youtu.be/cOPe9WqpOAc

    The first time I saw the video I thought it was so cool these typically macho guys could enjoy the moment when Elsa accepts her difference and her power.

  • http://Reallyawakeguy.blogspot.com somnus

    #20. Good point, actually. That video demonstrates quite handily that male audiences *can* identify with the struggles of a well-portrayed female character. You don’t *have* to default to a male character to convey a message of broad or universal appeal.

  • Chiroptera

    …but I had no idea how badly the movie is apparently destroying the male ego.

    C’mon, Ed. You’ve read enough trash by MRAs to understand how terribly fragile the male ego is.

  • dingojack

    perhaps these numb-nuts need to read The Man in the Grey Flannel Suit

    Dingo

  • otrame

    Hmm. They must be awfully easy to emasculate.

  • Michael Heath

    Ironic this was being whined about when American Sniper’s # 1 at the box office.

  • gregoryweagle

    @Michael Heath: Those whiners are slow in the head. Frozen was released over a year ago and did over $1 billion at the box office. I’m amazed that they have finally got to complaining about this movie.

  • hrafn

    It would seem that the American male ego is such a delicate flower that even a single movie that is not (either literally or figuratively) ‘all about the boy’ is enough to emasculate it.

    I’m afraid the only thing we can do is incarcerate the entire American male population, so we can ensure that they see nothing but John Wayne, Chuck Norrie and Arnie movies. It’s the only way to be safe.

  • U Frood

    Don’t you see? While as usual true love saved the day at the end of Frozen, Disney perverted it but stealing the man’s rightful role as the target of that true love and having it be a sister’s love for her sister be the thing that saved they day.

    How can men be the hero if it’s sister-love that has the power?

  • StevoR

    @gregoryweagle : Well, not all of them were that slow. One Moromon woman reacted in rather hilarious fashion here :

    http://www.thestranger.com/slog/archives/2014/02/20/mormon-woman-made-insane-by-frozen&view=comments

    spotting Teh Ghey Ajendah she imagined into the script all through the movie!

    BTW. I’ve got a four year old niece that’s been a mad fan of all things ‘Frozen’ movie ~wise for about the last year or so. Strangely enough I haven’t felt the least bit castrated by this. (FWIW. She’s also heavily into barbie dolls too.)

    Iguess by this sortof fundy logic watching most conventional Bechdel (spelling?) test Hollywood fillums automatically sterilises women viewers and turns them into bucth lesbians or something? No?

  • StevoR

    @^ Argh! Sorry about the (mostly non-deliberate) typos there.

    Corrections : Moromom = Mormon.

    I guess by this sort of fundy “logic” watching most conventional Bechdel (spelling?) test failing Hollywood fillums automatically sterilises women viewers?

    PS. At least one Feminist blogger also sees a subversive undercurrent to ‘Frozen’ and its biggest song too – see :

    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/nolongerquivering/2014/03/let-it-gay-subversive-messages-from-disneys-frozen/

  • StevoR

    @21. somnus :

    #20. [cptdoom -ed.] Good point, actually. That video demonstrates quite handily that male audiences *can* identify with the struggles of a well-portrayed female character. You don’t *have* to default to a male character to convey a message of broad or universal appeal.

    Then there’s Buffy, Xena Warrior Princess, Lara Croft Tomb raider, Dark Angel, Birds of Prey, etc .. plus thelife life historical inspirations of Boadicea (s?), Joan of Arc, Queen Elizabeth, Pirate women Anne Bonny & Marty Read, Judith the Hebrew widow who assassinated the would be conqueror Holofernes in the Old Testament among many other examples.

    IOW. There have always been heroes – fictional and otherwise – of various genders that appeal to all people. This has not ever been a bad thing.

  • http://motherwell.livejournal.com/ Raging Bee

    US Marines Watch Frozen & Sing Let It Go…

    The cold never bothers them anyway. Neither do any other extreme conditions.

  • jefferylanam

    The Comedy Central show @Midnight had some things to say about Fox’s analysis. (sorry, it may not play outside the USA.)

  • Doc Bill

    I’m certain Penny Nance is the inspiration behind

    Mrs. Betty Bowers, America’s Best Christian

  • wscott

    I think U Frood @ 28 nailed it – what sticks in their craw is that the True Love that saves the day at the end doesn’t involve a guy at all. Cuz love of family is apparently a bad thing now to the “pro-family” crowd?

    .

    Interestingly, you can say the same thing about Brave; all the men are kindof bumbling idiots, and the plot revolves around Merida’s relationship with her mother. In fact, unlike Anna Merida ends the movie as man-free-and-happy-about-it as she was at the start. But of course Brave didn’t make a fraction of the money Frozen did, so it wasn’t as big a target.

    .

    As for Mulan, I think the misogynists were willing to overlook that one because while Mulan is a badass tomboy warrior, she’s basically the only female character in an otherwise all-male story.

    .

    And no, I don’t have kids either. :)

  • RickR

    @26-

    Frozen was released over a year ago and did over $1 billion at the box office. I’m amazed that they have finally got to complaining about this movie.

    Concerned Women of America is concerned! I’m sure they’re very distraught that the movie was so financially successful

    Not me, though. The gold never bothered me anyway.

  • Daniel Schealler

    I’ve never seen the movie Frozen (I don’t have kids, so I never will)…

    Oh come on Ed. Let the Disney magic in to warm the cockles of your cold, black, atheistic heart. ^_^

  • http://artk.typepad.com ArtK

    Just to get this bit out of the way: My kids are well past the “Disney age” (17 & 19), but my wife and I enjoy watching Disney movies. Hasn’t hurt my curmudgeon credentials either.

    Closer to topic: I can’t wait until they see Maleficent. Central character: Female and very strong. Supporting character (Aurora): Starts sweet and passive but takes decisive independent action when the story calls for it. There’s one male minion and a few bad guys. The one potential “hero” fails at his main task, on which the whole resolution of the movie hinges. Again, True Love saves the day, but it’s a mother’s love.

  • StevoR

    @36. RickR : “Not me, though. The gold never bothered me anyway.”

    LOL! Guess you won’t enjoy this classic kids cartoon then ..

    http://www.sbs.com.au/ondemand/video/363520067671/mysterious-cities-of-gold-s1-ep1-esteban-child-of-the-sun

    (Note clip expires on 13th Feb – hope non-Aussies can see it – ‘Mysterious Cities of Gold’ nice blend of 16th century history drama and SF.)

  • dingojack

    If the princess unleashed her awesome power on a peach that’d perfectly fine for the RWNJ — right?

    Dingo

  • eric

    Haven’t seen it but have read story ripoffs and summaries to my kid. I can’t believe the right lost their sh*t crying ‘lesbian’ when the movie was about two sisters. What kinda mind sees a movie about one sister trying to help another and immediately assumes incest?

    Hollywood in general has often sent the message that men are superfluous

    They often are. Statistically speaking, they’ll be superfluous in 25% of one-on-one human interactions. :)

  • wscott

    @ Eric: Elsa does have some subtle lesbian subtext going on, not in the relationship with her sister, but in the “deeply repressed & alienated from everyone because I have a big secret which started around when I hit puberty, and they’ll all hate me if they know the truth” thing, leading up to her big Let It Go number which is all about “I’m done hiding who I am!” Lots of LGBT people have pointed out it fits great as a coming-out song.

    I read an article awhile back claiming that a number of Disney writers & animators over the years, many of whom were either gay themselves or had gay friends, made it a point to work themes into the movies that gay kids could relate to. Think how many times the “I don’t love who my parents/society tells me I should love; I have to follow my heart” is a theme. Or think about Pinochio trying to act like “a real boy” by learning to drink & smoke, etc because he thinks that will make his father love him more.

    [shrug] It was Something I Read On The Internet, so I have no idea how much truth there was in it. The article was in no way presenting this as a bad thing; it was more like “Go, you little rebels you!”

  • dingojack

    “I don’t love who my parents/society tells me I should love; I have to follow my heart”

    Walt Disney wrote Romeo & Juliet, who knew?

    😉 Dingo

  • wscott

    @ dingo: no one ever accused Disney of having an excess of originality.