Barton: Mortgages Are Of the Devil

David Barton, always on the lookout for any verse in the Bible he can pretend is a political command that tells Christians how to vote, now says that all debt is against the word of God. He does this by citing Deuteronomy 15:6-8, which says:

For the Lord your God will bless you, as he promised you, and you shall lend to many nations, but you shall not borrow, and you shall rule over many nations, but they shall not rule over you.

And his conclusion from this:

“The Bible tells us, Proverbs 22:7, that the borrower is servant to the lender,” Barton said. “See, the Bible is real clear: stay out of debt. You lose your freedom when you get into debt. Well, that applies for individuals, it applies for families, it applies for churches, it applies for states, it applies for the nation. God doesn’t want you in debt, which is why Deuteronomy 15:6 says your nation is not to go into debt. Here we are. That’s not a political issue, that’s a biblical issue. God spoke about that a long time before America ever existed.”

Gee, I wonder if David Barton has a mortgage on his house or if he paid cash. If he has a mortgage he is, by his own “reasoning,” sinning against God himself.

httpv://youtu.be/0SVWjXIj8rY

POPULAR AT PATHEOS Nonreligious
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  • Alverant

    He probably paid for it in full with donations meant for his church.

    I wonder how he’ll apply his logic to conservative politicians who work for banks.

  • raven

    Is there a state or local government that doesn’t issue bonds?

    Probably not. Including the state of Texas.

    Bonds are…debt that carry interest charges.

    What is the penalty here according to the bible? None that I can see.

    FWIW, god is addresssing ancient Israel and Judea, which ceased to exist as an independent state several millennia ago. Last I saw, we live in…the USA.

  • eamick

    If debt is really against the word of God, I’d love to hear his explanation for the passage in Leviticus describing the jubilee year, in which all debts are forgiven. Idiot.

  • dugglebogey

    There’s a nationally famous guy right down the street from here (literally less than a mile) named Dave Ramsey who preaches (literally) in his “financial radio show” about how “the borrower is a slave to the lender” and that God wants you to be debt free. His advice is actually pretty solid (if not totally obvious), stuff like living within your means etc. except he requires you to tithe no matter how dire your finances are. People are forever calling and begging for permission to withhold their tithe to the church until they are more stable financially and he totally forbids it.

    Anyway, he preaches more than he gives financial advice, but even he allows for mortgages. He wants them paid off as fast as possible, but he doesn’t call those with them sinners.

  • Pierce R. Butler

    I don’t really need to ask, but just for the record: does Barton say anything about the financial corporations whose freewheeling ways with mortgages, derivatives based on mortgages, etc, torpedoed the US economy, and cost (at minimum) hundreds of thousands of families their homes, in the closing years of the Bush-Cheney administration?

  • Larry

    People are forever calling and begging for permission to withhold their tithe to the church until they are more stable financially and he totally forbids it

    He’s channeling a scene from Goodfellas with the role of Paulie being played by god:

    Business bad? “Fuck you, pay me.” Oh, you had a fire? “Fuck you, pay me.” Place got hit by lightning, huh? “Fuck you, pay me.”

  • John Pieret

    Boy, if nobody takes out mortgages, the housing market would plummet and the economic crash would make the Great Recession of 2008 look like a hiccup.

    Why does Barton hate America?

  • Georgia Sam

    I guess that makes Reagan, who tripled the national debt, a slave of Satan. And Bill Clinton, who turned the federal budget deficit into a surplus, the most righteous president we’ve had in at least

  • kenn

    Grifters don’t pay their own mortgages; their victims do.

  • Georgia Sam

    Sorry about the incomplete sentence. I don’t do well with touchscreen interfaces. That remainder of that sentence was to be:

    30 or 40 years.

  • kantalope

    Wait ’til Barton finds out about usury. Gonna make the Bankers look even worse.

  • sanford

    I am guessing that before he scammed a lot of money from people who believe his spiel that he had a mortgage on his first house. And I am sure before he had any real money he was probably carrying a monthly debt on his credit card and probably paying off a car loan.

  • robertfaber

    Ed used to sell mortgages. Clearly he was enticing people into sin.

  • http://www.pandasthumb.org Area Man

    That’s not a political issue, that’s a biblical issue. God spoke about that a long time before America ever existed.

    I wonder if he’s aware that the nation, which he seems to think is the result of divine providence, could not have existed in the first place if it hadn’t gone deeply into debt to pay for a war?

  • sigurd jorsalfar

    But if borrowing is a sin, how come Fred Thompson, a great god-fearing Republican, was on my teevee the other day telling me about the virtues of a reverse mortgage and reminding me that it was no less a figure than Ronald Reagan himself (PBUH) who got the concept enacted into law? Ronald Reagan would never have made a law that went against God’s law. How can a great christian theologian like David Barton not be aware of that basic truth?

  • grumpyoldfart

    Barble’s right.

    Barble’s never wrong.

    Barble’s not opposed to taxes.

    This is what barble says about taxes: Go to the lake and throw out your line. Take the first fish you catch; open its mouth and you will find a four-drachma coin. Take it and give it to them for my tax and yours. (Matthew 17:27)

    So now you know. Don’t go to the bank; go fishing instead.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=153100784 Michael Brew

    The stupidest thing is that the passage obviously doesn’t mean what he says it means. God is just bragging about how much money and power he’s going to give Israel, so that they won’t have to do those things. He’s not telling Israel not to do it.

  • dingojack

    Deuteronomy 15:1-11

    1 At the end of every seven years thou shalt make a release.

    2 And this is the manner of the release: Every creditor that lendeth ought unto his neighbour shall release it; he shall not exact it of his neighbour, or of his brother; because it is called the Lord’s release.

    3 Of a foreigner thou mayest exact it again: but that which is thine with thy brother thine hand shall release;

    4 Save when there shall be no poor among you; for the Lord shall greatly bless thee in the land which the Lord thy God giveth thee for an inheritance to possess it:

    5 Only if thou carefully hearken unto the voice of the Lord thy God, to observe to do all these commandments which I command thee this day.

    6 For the Lord thy God blesseth thee, as he promised thee: and thou shalt lend unto many nations, but thou shalt not borrow; and thou shalt reign over many nations, but they shall not reign over thee.

    7 If there be among you a poor man of one of thy brethren within any of thy gates in thy land which the Lord thy God giveth thee, thou shalt not harden thine heart, nor shut thine hand from thy poor brother:

    8 But thou shalt open thine hand wide unto him, and shalt surely lend him sufficient for his need, in that which he wanteth.

    9 Beware that there be not a thought in thy wicked heart, saying, The seventh year, the year of release, is at hand; and thine eye be evil against thy poor brother, and thou givest him nought; and he cry unto the Lord against thee, and it be sin unto thee.

    10 Thou shalt surely give him, and thine heart shall not be grieved when thou givest unto him: because that for this thing the Lord thy God shall bless thee in all thy works, and in all that thou puttest thine hand unto.

    11 For the poor shall never cease out of the land: therefore I command thee, saying, Thou shalt open thine hand wide unto thy brother, to thy poor, and to thy needy, in thy land.”

    Clearly Barton is just as fine a biblical scholar as he is an historian.

    Dingo

  • caseloweraz

    And in addition to that, of course, there is the parable of the talents (Matthew 25: 14-30).