Bolling: Former NFL Players are ‘Wussies’ For Talking About Head Trauma

Eric Bolling, the third dumbest man on Fox News (behind Steve Doocy and Brian Kilmeade) says that Mike Ditka and Brett Favre are “wussies” for saying that they wouldn’t let their son play football given the huge risk of lifelong damage from head trauma. Easy for a guy to say when he hasn’t had Reggie White and Julius Peppers smashing them to the ground for 20 years. Nothing like macho bluster from a guy safely sitting in a TV studio.

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  • dingojack

    Well to be fair — these doofuses didn’t need head trauma to get brain damage…

    Dingo

  • D. C. Sessions

    It’s a matter of priorities, after all. How can you possibly let minor things like death and lifelong disability interfere with a Fox News personality’s amusement?

  • mkoormtbaalt

    Yeah! They’re giant wussies! I would even make my kids play football with leather helmets and I’ll only feed them raw eggs and rare meat! That’ll put hair on their chests!

  • colnago80

    Let’s see this asshole say that to Ditka’s and Favre’s face.

  • Michael Heath

    I don’t endorse playing football. That’s for two reasons – head injuries and the fact it endorses violence as an attractive behavior much like Hollywood movies endorse belief and faith. And I had a nice dose of gridiron glory in high school – both individually and as part of a successful team. I also enjoyed playing in adult leagues into my early-30s. I had my share of head injuries, including at least four from football (and two more from other sports).

    I learned a number of valuable lessons playing football. But I think those lessons can be imparted in other venues that don’t have all the baggage that comes with football, or the fighting sports.

    One lesson that applies well in business is that ‘speed kills’. The other is that hard work relentlessly and smartly applied typically pays off. The last point is one reason I’m chagrined by the god-botherers thanking God for a good outcome in a sporting event.

  • Al Dente

    George Carlin discussed the difference between football and baseball:

    In football the object is for the quarterback, also known as the field general, to be on target with his aerial assault, riddling the defense by hitting his receivers with deadly accuracy in spite of the blitz, even if he has to use the shotgun. With short bullet passes and long bombs, he marches his troops into enemy territory, balancing this aerial assault with a sustained ground attack that punches holes in the forward wall of the enemy’s defensive line.

    In baseball the object is to go home. And to be safe. – I hope I’ll be safe at home!

  • http://onhandcomments.blogspot.com/ left0ver1under

    It’s to be expected. Those are the same clowns who are gung-ho for new wars in Iran and elsewhere, but ran away from military service as fast as they could. The only uniform they have ever put on in their lives was at their private boarding schools, not a military or football uniform.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    This “massive head injury” thing is just something the homos made up to distract from the very real threat of gays in sports!

  • Al Dente

    Modusoperandi @8

    And Benghazi.

  • daved

    According to Wikipedia, Bolling himself was a baseball player. He was even drafted by Pittsburgh in the 22nd round but eventually had to leave baseball due to a rotator cuff injury. What a wuss.

  • John Pieret

    “Caring for the health and safety of your children” = “wuss”

    We Americans live in a strange time in a strange country.

  • Alverant

    Incidents like this shows the inherent selfish nature of conservative thought. They don’t see other people as real people. They see them as toys for their amusement to be used, abused, and thrown away when they break. We see a similar attitude in how they treat wounded war veterans.

  • https://plus.google.com/111275519309902490521 Pam Ryan

    Abolish American Football. It is mind numbingly tedious and they wear silly hats.

  • http://motherwell.livejournal.com/ Raging Bee

    Calling parents “wusses” because they don’t want their kids to suffer permanent brain damage? That’s nut just stupid, that’s malicious.

    Abolish American Football. It is mind numbingly tedious and they wear silly hats.

    At least one coach is telling his team to lose the hats, during practice at least, in order to stop players from using their heads as both weapons and shields. The thinking is that this could make football safer.

    And speaking of safety, has anyone done any comparison between rugby and American football WRT head injuries? Those guys wear almost NOTHING in the way of protective gear, and yet I’ve not heard of rugby players suffering traumatic brain injuries on a regular basis.

  • http://onhandcomments.blogspot.com/ left0ver1under

    Raging Bee (#14) –

    At least one coach is telling his team to lose the hats, during practice at least, in order to stop players from using their heads as both weapons and shields. The thinking is that this could make football safer.

    Non-contact practices (jersey and helmets only, no hitting) are a better answer. Players learn and practice their positioning on plays without taking hits.

    The CFL has banned off season full contact practices, and the players are fighting to have fewer such practices, even during training camp. It hasn’t hurt how the game is played…then again, I doubt it has done much to reduce the instances of CTE. Ex-CFL players have the exact same life expectancy as ex-NFL players. Other leagues limiting full contact include California high schools and the Ivy League.

    I would include more links than the two below, but I don’t want to go into moderation.

    And speaking of safety, has anyone done any comparison between rugby and American football WRT head injuries? Those guys wear almost NOTHING in the way of protective gear, and yet I’ve not heard of rugby players suffering traumatic brain injuries on a regular basis.

    You haven’t heard because rugby is not a high profile game in the US. CTE is rampant there too.

    http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn25182-rugby-players-warned-of-longterm-brain-injury-risks.html

    http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1728218-rugby-player-welfare-update-confirmed-link-between-rugby-and-cte

    The key difference between rugby and football isn’t the ferocity of the hits, but where and how often. Scrums make up only a small percentage of play in rugby, most of the play is in the open field. Compare that with football where linemen clash helmet to helmet on every play. There’s also the rules on hitting – aside from scrums, the only person who can be hit on a rugby field is the ball carrier, no football type blocking allowed. Football allows (read: encourages) blindside hits on every play that are as damaging as a boxer punching another in the jaw.

    Even soccer is not immune with at least one known case of CTE causing death. Some youth leagues have banned heading the ball until a certain age.

  • scienceavenger

    @4 I though the same thing. Old or not, Ditka would probably punch Bolling in the face.

    @13 I’ll bet you think chess is dull too, all that waiting…

    @14 The biggest difference between rugby and football is that in rugby you really can’t use your head as a weapon. The irony in footall is the helmets, which were designed to protect our heads, end up making them weapons, which ends up injuring the heads further.

  • colnago80

    Re daved @ #10

    If he was drafted that low, his probability of making a major league team was also probably pretty remote.