Politifact on Carson, Huckabee and Fiorina

We’ve had three new candidates officially declare their candidacy for the Republican presidential nomination this week — Ben Carson, Mike Huckabee and Carly Fiorina. PolitiFact reviews the record of their examinations of claims those three have made and, unsurprisingly, the record isn’t very good. Huckabee is the one who has been factchecked the most:

Of the three, we’ve fact-checked Huckabee the most, thanks to his previous run for president in 2007, when he staked out a position as a down-to-earth economic populist with strong appeal to evangelicals.

One of our more memorable fact-checks from that race was Huckabee’s claim that the signers of the Declaration of Independence were “brave people, most of whom, by the way, were clergymen.” Huckabee (who has worked as a minister) was totally off on the numbers: Only one out of 56 signers was a clergyman. We rated the statement Pants on Fire.

This is a standard Christian right lie, originating with David Barton. 55 of the 56 signers of the Declaration had college degrees from universities that were founded as seminaries originally, but that is not at all the same thing as claiming that they were clergymen. In fact, most of their degrees were in law, not theology, and PolitiFact is right that only one of them was actually a preacher (John Witherspoon). Overall, Huckabee’s record on the factcheck site is about 50/50, with 16 claims rated as true, mostly true or half true, and 15 rated as false, mostly false of pants on fire lie.

Carly Fiorina has only been fact-checked five times by the site, with one claim being rated as half true and the other four as false, mostly false or pants on fire. I doubt that includes her recent claim that federal government employees spend their days watching porn, which was based on an IG report on one single employee who had porn on his work computer.

Ben Carson has only been factchecked twice, with one being rated mostly false and the other false. Now that he’s a candidate, I’m sure they’ll start factchecking him more often. I doubt his record will get any better.

POPULAR AT PATHEOS Nonreligious
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  • colnago80

    They didn’t rate her claim that her record as a CEO qualifies her to be president. Certainly her record at HP doesn’t as she was fired. Just ask the 30 thousand employees she laid off.

  • cottonnero

    For a certain segment of the GOP base, “She got rid of 30,000 unnecessary employees at HP; just imagine what she could do to the federal government!” is a pretty solid selling point.

  • colnago80

    Re cottonnero @ #2

    The layoffs were caused by her almost running the company into the ground, to join DEC, once the second largest computer company in the world.

  • scienceavenger

    They may have to create new categories for Carson:

    You can’t be serious.

    That was out loud, did you know that?

    Off your meds looney.

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    colnago80 “The layoffs were caused by her almost running the company into the ground, to join DEC, once the second largest computer company in the world.”

    And so? Look, us Republicans know that we have to destroy this village to save it. You Democrats ruin things through fecklessness and incompetence. We ruin things deliberately. It’s Creative Destruction. If you knew something about the Free Market System, you’d understand.

    As such, Carly Fiorina would make an ideal Republican, if only she wasn’t held back by her crippling lack of resentment and missing Y chromosome.

  • colnago80

    Re Modusoperandi @ #5

    Look, us Republicans know that we have to destroy this village to save it.

    Boy, how did that work out in Vietnam?

  • hoku

    Problem is that politifact has very little credibility. I have a hard time believing that Huckabee is all the way up at 50%, but it’s nice that they got there by including his claim to have fried squirrel in a popcorn popper as true.

  • jimnorth

    By contrast, Hillary Clinton’s 101 checked facts put her at 71% true to half-true and about 29 % false. What happened to the line that “all politicians lie all the time”? I do so want to continue believing…

  • ffakr

    @#3 “The layoffs were caused by her almost running the company into the ground, to join DEC, once the second largest computer company in the world.”

    She didn’t run HP into the ground “to join DEC”.

    Digital had already run itself into the ground when Compaq acquired it in January 1998.

    Carly was named CEO of HP in July 1999.

    She then went to work destroying HP, including a merger with Compaq in late 2001. By the time Carly was forced out, DEC didn’t exist as a stand-alone company. It was subsumed by the company Carly was forced out of.

    I recall that Compaq merger well as I was working in the IT Industry at the time.

    From what I recall, Compaq was still shipping a lot of units back then but everyone I knew in IT considered them to be a 2nd-tier company in terms of quality.. not to mention their case designs were ugly as hell.

    To us, we couldn’t figure out why a company like HP with an excellent reputation in multiple market segments [home, enterprise, networking] would spend a boat-load of cash to buy the IT-equivelant of K-Mart.

    It was as if BMW decided to buy Chrysler back when Chrysler’s best sellers were early Caravans [the ones notorious for rusting and burning oil] and bland K-Cars.

    I seem to remember the justification was that HP hoped to expand their presence in the PC market, particularly the budget-conscious home market. Compaq commanded a lot of shelf-space in stores like BestBuy back then. HP was a stronger player in Enterprise markets at the time. To me, a better solution would have been to simply build better inexpensive HP home computers, not to dilute your brand by merging with a less respected company.

  • whheydt

    The thing I most remember as a result of HP buying Compaq was that HP started using Compaq keyboards…which were, and had been all the way back to the original Compaq “luggable”, complete and utter crap.

  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_R2XG9CnOj8 Olav

    I liked the beige Compaq cases. I also still have a Compaq Prolinea 5100. Used it for a low traffic web server for quite a few years.

    The keyboards were cheap crap indeed.

  • caseloweraz

    One thing I’ve never understood is how the brand names fell out. My impression of Hewlett-Packard is that it made the best electronic test equipment going (except for oscilloscopes, where Tektronix had it beat by a small margin.) Yet the HP brand is now only on computers and printers, while test equipment was spun off under Agilent (and more recently Keysight.)

  • http://en.uncyclopedia.co/wiki/User:Modusoperandi Modusoperandi

    colnago80 “Boy, how did that work out in Vietnam?”

    One party rule, privatizing state companies and expanding economic disparity? It’s just about ideal. Needs more Jesus, though.

  • colnago80

    Re ffakr @ #9

    I stated that poorly. What I meant to say that HP almost joined DEC in the dustbin thanks to ole Carly’s incompetence. DEC was, at one time the 2nd largest computer manufacturer in the world but was run into the ground by incompetent management.

  • colnago80

    Re ffakr @ #9

    The big problem with the purchase of Compaq as I understand it was that they paid considerably more then the company was worth.

    Of course, at one time in the nineties, Apple was on the ropes to the extent that Michael Dell was quoted as saying that the management should shut down the company and pay off the stockholders.

  • colnago80

    Re caseloweraz @ #12

    HP was the gold standard of laser printers at the time. My MP4 is built with battleship construction and still running fine after more then 20 years, in contrast to today’s products that are positively flimsy. Unfortunately, not having a USB port makes it obsolete as parallel ports and Apple Talk are long gone from today’s computers.