He’ll Win It In Regulation

Yep. The cartoon by RJ Matson in the St. Louis Post Dispatch just about says it all:

obamacartoon.gif



[tags]atheist, atheism[/tags]

  • Scorpious

    You’re still going to get people saying she needs to be the candidate for whatever reason.

    While I wish and hope they do follow the will of the people, I do know that this fall, a Democratic candidate will get in, just given what has happened these past 8 years.

    If McCain does get in, by whatever hook or crooks he uses or is used on his behalf, I hope Governor Tim Pawlenty is with him so my home state can get someone who knows what they are doing in there. Also, I doubt this country would stand for it. That is, if this country isn’t distracted by Paris or Lindsey or Britney getting out of a car nekkid or whatever.

  • Susan

    I see the comments on working on this thread, unlike the previous one.

    I remain hopeful that the American people aren’t as stupid as they were a few years ago. I have also accepted a job in Canada as a fall-back plan.

  • Shane

    @Susan: And you may make it to Canada just in time for a Conservative majority government. Yay….

  • James

    I’m afraid that whoever wins the democratic nomination will lose to McCain anyway. I think that supporters of the losing side will be bitter enough over the loss that they will vote for McCain out of spite.

  • Milena

    @Shane – Few conservatives over here would be as bad as McCain. Harper’s pretty much bullied the Senate and opposition into giving him what he wants so far, but it has mostly been economic policy, not removal of rights, like gay marriage. As far as I can tell, he’s not interested in touching our rights and I don’t think the liberal-leaning Senate would allow him, if he were to gain majority. Anyways, with the recent election scandal and Mulroney’s hearings, the Conservatives’ image might just get as damaged as the Liberals, although Dion seems pretty weak, so I wouldn’t bet on a liberal majority government anytime soon, either.

    I really do hope the Democrats aren’t broken up after a candidate is chosen. McCain scares me on a couple of key-issues, namely abortion rights, and the war in Iraq. Then there’s a whole slew of issues that would probably get swept under the table with him, such as comprehensive sex education, the Gag policy, health care, gay marriage (altough neither Clinton, nor Obama support full-on gay marriage, either), pay equity, etc.

  • http://atheistokie.wordpress.com/ Atheist Okie

    The Democrats have already lost November. So much internal bickering and fighting has pretty much cinched this one for McCain. After the super-delegates are forced to pick a side, I predict all hell will break loose and everyone will forget who the real political enemy is. Plus, none of the other democrats on the national level seem to have enough backbone to say enough is enough to Bush and his lackeys.

    I predict John McCain wins in November, dies of old age, and either VP Romney or Huckabee takes America in the direction of a Pat Robertson wet dream.

    As for science in America and the voice of reason…..kiss it all goodbye you commy atheists.

    We’re doomed, doomed I say!!!

  • Mriana

    :lol: That’s funny, because it sounds exactly like Billary.

  • Milena

    Mriana, the use of “Billary” in relation to Clinton would be like me calling Obama “Osama”, or something equally inane. This is exactly the kind of attitude that’ll get McCain in office.

    Honestly, I’ve read Clinton’s policy and I’ve read Obama’s and they are so incredibly similar. Plus, Clinton’s health care proposal seems more progressive to me. All in all, they are both good candidates, in my opinion, and they would probably end up taking the country in a similar direction. So, why all the vehemence when talking about Clinton?

  • Darryl

    While I wish and hope they do follow the will of the people, I do know that this fall, a Democratic candidate will get in, just given what has happened these past 8 years.

    Don’t kid yourself, McCain could win. Too many Americans are stupid.

    I’m afraid that whoever wins the democratic nomination will lose to McCain anyway. I think that supporters of the losing side will be bitter enough over the loss that they will vote for McCain out of spite.

    I was appalled at the numbers of Dems that say they won’t vote or will vote for McCain if their candidate doesn’t get the nomination. That tells me just how stupid Americans can be. After all that has happened, and they think that way??!!

    The Democrats have already lost November. So much internal bickering and fighting has pretty much cinched this one for McCain. After the super-delegates are forced to pick a side, I predict all hell will break loose and everyone will forget who the real political enemy is. Plus, none of the other democrats on the national level seem to have enough backbone to say enough is enough to Bush and his lackeys.

    Don’t lose hope. But, it may be very close. It shouldn’t be; the Dem should win in a landslide, but America has changed, and it’s not thinking very clearly these days. And don’t even get me started on the spineless Dems in Congress. I’m disgusted by them. They’re letting the Constitutional Republic slip through their fingers without a fight.

    So, why all the vehemence when talking about Clinton?

    Very simple. She sounds like the despicable, win-at-any-cost, the-truth-be-damned Republicans. Haven’t we had enough of liars and cheats in government? Hillary is shaming herself and her party (her country too for that matter) by her antics. I can’t believe it but I actually pondered today whether I’ve been too hard on the knotheads at Fox news. They’ve thought all along that Bill and Hillary were lying schemers. Maybe I owe them an apology.

  • Mriana

    Milena said,

    April 27, 2008 at 10:23 pm

    Mriana, the use of “Billary” in relation to Clinton would be like me calling Obama “Osama”, or something equally inane. This is exactly the kind of attitude that’ll get McCain in office.

    I seriously doubt it and even though I’m for Obama, I’m not bothered by Osama. Let’s face it though, if Hillary gets into office we will have two pres for the price of one and it won’t be like a first lady deal. Bill will be right in that office too, thus Billary. Even so, I’m not worried about McCain winning over silly words nor am I worried about Billary winning either. I seriously doubt they will.

  • Sudo

    Clinton’s health care proposal seems more progressive to me.

    Is the progressive part garnishing wages of those who don’t want to participate in her plan?

    And what’s with the basketball cartoon? Isn’t that a bit racist?

  • JustMe

    The Democrats winning the Presidency is definitely not a done deal. Look how they messed up a gimmie election in 2004.

    As an atheist and a friggen frustrated registered Republican, I don’t see the Dems clearly being the more sane or competent. All 3 top candidates are religious wackos or sucking up to religious wackos as far as I can tell. I *HOPE* that Obama or McCain are just playing with the radicals and will completely shut them out of any important decision if they gain the Presidency. I am not betting on that.

    My personal regret over the last 8 years? Not voting for Gore; went with the independent. My personal consolation? Not voting for Bush either time.

  • http://religiouscomics.net Jeff

    McCain will probably end up winning in November. The republicans will probably be able to scrape together (again) just enough votes in the electoral college building a coalition of the following groups:
    1. elderly who don’t trust young whippersnappers
    2. racists who will find a reason not to like Obama
    3. sexists who don’t want a women in power
    4. Jesus freaks who will find a reason not to vote Democratic
    5. physical conservatives who will vote Republican
    6. people born Republican who will always vote Republican
    7. Southerners who will vote Republican to “stick it to Yankee”
    8. Small government advocates who will vote Republican

    McCain will “play the high road” and try to get the party not to do all the dirty tricks, but dirty tricks they will do. All the “right” buttons will be pushed and history will repeat itself. The supreme court will shift WAY to the right. Orwell’s novel “1984″ will be upon us. Perpetual war. Double-speak.

    That is unless there are lots and lots of bloggers (and blog readers) that actually bother to vote.

  • JeffN

    Does the public vote in a presidential election actually mean anything?. Or is it all just a crapshoot. How do we know that are next president hasn’t already been decided and where all just going through the motions. Personally I think super delegates and the electoral college should have the same responsibilities as the vice president; cast the tie wining vote in the event of a tie, and monitor the health of the president(ial) election system and not much more. Either way I believe the democrats or quickly going from a minor foot wound to a case of gangrene the longer the democratic Soap opera
    continues. I wonder who’s leg will be sawed off.

  • Darryl

    5. physical conservatives who will vote Republican

    We’re all “physical,” you meant fiscal.

    Related to Obama, I saw Rev. Wright’s Moyers interview. Nothing in the interview was disturbing or unheard of. Of all the statements he has made that I have seen, even the “controversial” ones, the only one that I don’t agree with is the conspiracy theory about aids being introduced into the black community. He’s conventionally liberal in the black, religious tradition.

    Speaking of conspiracies, the idea floating around amongst some that Hillary is intentionally undermining Barack so that she can come back to win in 2012 I cannot believe. She wants it too much, she wants it now, and in four years the political climate may have changed to the point that the country will no longer be interested in her. Besides, it would be a tremendous risk. What if McCain turns out to be a great President? If the economy turns around and things settle down in Iraq and the middle East, he’ll get the credit and the Dems may have lost their chance.

    Having said that, it is interesting to consider the merits of a McCain Presidency: if McCain is President, he gets stuck with all the problems the country is facing (a good measure of which we owe to his Party). If things continue to get worse, the Dems build an even bigger, more energized coalition, the Republicans sink further into ignominy, the Christian Right will be finished off in politics, there is plenty of time for all the crimes, lies and cover-ups of this Administration to begin leaking out of Washington, and for their investigation, the full implications of the war in Iraq will be more fully known, the health-care crisis and others will have come to a head, etc., etc. Most of all, the many, many stupid Americans who are to blame for our present set of crises may have learned something about how to run a country well.

    Nothing like hard times to make you get real.

  • Spurs Fan

    The Democrats have already lost November. So much internal bickering and fighting has pretty much cinched this one for McCain

    Only because we’re buying into this media lie. Since when did a competitive political race become “bickering”? Since when did having all 50 states have their vote truly matter become bad? Since when did having record turnouts in the primaries become a negative thing?

    Maybe, I’m idealistic, but…the Dems will sort this out at least by the convention (they’ll also hopefully scrap superdelgates) and whoever loses will get behind the winner (or maybe be the VP nominee) and will have three months to remind everyone that we’re unified against John McCain, the one-time “maverick”, but recent Bush ass-kisser who wants to stay in Iraq indefinitely, comes nowhere close to reforming health care and the economy, and is generally seen as a liability because of his age. I know he’s a war hero, but so was John Kerry in 2004 (compared to Bush who has never served in the U.S. military) and he lost.

    On a final note, I support Obama, but Senator Clinton has the right to continue in the race as there are eight more states and a convention to be had. We need to get away from this “Americans want everything fast, including their presidential nominee at the expense of democracy” attitude. This is a good thing people!

  • http://sandwalk.blogspot.com/ Larry Moran

    I wonder if Americans understand how bizarre this whole “primary” thing looks to the rest of the world? Who invented this system anyway and why are there only two parties?

    Why not have multiple candidates for President like other countries and then have a runoff election between the top two candidates? That way you could vote directly for Clinton, Obama, McCain or whoever else wants to run.

    Just cut out the middle man (primaries) and save yourselves lots of time and money.

  • David D.G.

    Larry Moran, I am an American who grew up in America, so I should see this system as perfectly natural for us, but I’m just as mystified as you are. I think the system is absolutely insane, and I dearly wish we could open the field up to more (and better) choices. However, it’s extremely hard to do.

    At some point, the two parties made common cause with each other and set it in law that any other political party has to meet much more stringent criteria than Republican or Democrat party candidates even to be considered “in the race.” And since the people who make those laws are the ones in Congress, and the rules as they stand make sure that they continue to dominate it, well, let’s just say I think that Satan will be wearing ice skates before the disparity against other political parties gets changed.

    Personally, I’d like to scrap primaries AND the utterly nonsensical Electoral College. The latter might have had some possible reason for existing up to a century ago, but there’s certainly no need for it now.

    ~David D.G.

  • JeffN

    There’s always Ralph Nator. :)


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