Saturday Link Love is a feature where I collect and post links to various articles I’ve come upon over the past week. Feel free to share any interesting articles you’ve come along as well! The more the merrier. Click through to read more! Read more

As far as I can make out, there is only one real difference between Michael and Marcus: Michael believed in treating women honorably, meaning that he married Angel before carting her, unconscious, off to his farm. Marcus did not believe in treating women honorably, meaning that he sought to have sex with Hadassah without having first married her. That’s it.  Click through to read more! Read more

Growing up, I don’t think I ever read Francine Rivers’ Redeeming Love. I know my sister did. Published in 1997, the book was all the rage in evangelical circles in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Since I have spent the last couple years reviewing another of Rivers’ books, A Voice in the Wind, I decided it was high time I read Redeeming Love—especially since it just happened to already be on my bookshelf (I actually don’t remember where I got it). It’s even worse than I expected. Read more

I’m reminded of the many Christian romance novels I read as a girl in which the author contrived to get a couple married at the outset of the story, and then provided the romance and sex. In one book, a group of outlaws come through a town in the Old West, grab a random man and a random woman and, just for kicks, marry them. They then send the couple off to the man’s farm on his wagon, at gun point. There the romance begins. Click through to read more! Read more

I’m left with questions. Was Devonte required by his parents to hold that sign? Was he allowed to opt out? I remember traveling to rallies with siblings who didn’t want to be there. Certainly, we were on the other side of the aisle—we were protesting against same-sex marriage and abortion—but we were participating in what feels like a similar sort of theater. Click through to read more! Read more

In a sense, Christian colleges and universities represent an extreme implementation of “safe space” ideology—or at least, of conservatives’ caricature of this “safe space” ideology. These schools are not safe for LGBTQ students or women, but for conservative evangelical and fundamentalist Christians, they create spaces where students will confront ideas outside of their bubble only through a Christian lens—a space where norms of behavior are carefully governed and those who violate community norms are expelled.  Click through to read more! Read more

It’s time for another Lesbian Duplex thread! If you have a link or article or interesting thought that’s not relevant to an ongoing thread, you can share it here. If a conversation on another post has turned entirely off topic, you can bring it here also. Every week, I put up a fresh post. I’ve added a “chatter” tab under my blog banner that will direct readers to these discussion threads, so no one will have to worry about digging for one. In any case, my comment policy lays out the house rules. Click through to read more! Read more

Saturday Link Love is a feature where I collect and post links to various articles I’ve come upon over the past week. Feel free to share any interesting articles you’ve come along as well! The more the merrier. Click through to read more! Read more

What started as a joke about Hadassah’s “mojo” has turned out to be anything but. Rivers writes it into everything. It’s no wonder I found this book so appealing as a teen. I wanted to be like Hadassah. I wanted to walk into a room and have people notice me like that. In many ways that is a very human and not a very Christian dying-to-self sort of thing to want. Rivers’ books gave me a legitimate way to want the sort of popularity and recognition that so many teens want—and a way to obtain it. All I had to do is try to be like Hadassah, and I could have her mojo. Click through to read more! Read more

Within evangelicalism today, there seem to be two disparate ways of talking about LGBT individuals and identities. The first involves disgust and revulsion and (often times) painting LGBT individuals as monsters or perverts. The second involves protestations of love and statements that gay and lesbian individuals can change or find meaning and purpose with God by living celibate lives. Both rhetorical approaches, however, do typically have at least one thing in common—opposition to expanding or protecting LGBT rights.  Click through to read more! Read more

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