"Children Are a Blessing" video – Quiverfull believers explain Quiverfull

For those readers who are interested in hearing an explanation of the Quiverfull philosophy and lifestyle, “Children Are a Blessing” by Moore Family Films is available free online through April 30th.

Children are a Blessing from Moore Family Films on Vimeo.

Children are a Blessing from Moore Family Films on Vimeo.

NLQ Recommended Reading …

Breaking Their Will: Shedding Light on Religious Child Maltreatment‘ by Janet Heimlich

Quivering Daughters‘ by Hillary McFarland

Quiverfull: Inside the Christian Patriarchy Movement‘ by Kathryn Joyce

 

  • The Graduate

    The sad thing is, when done right, big families can be great. But they shouldn’t be made because of twisted Bible passages or a feeling of compulsion. I have seen both cases, and the latter usually doesn’t turn out well.

  • Rebecca M

    I only made it about 2.5 minutes into the video before I started rolling my eyes so hard I had to shut it off. Because we want fewer children or no children that means we see them as an inconvenience? Cue the eye rolling. Women in previous generations embraced their calling and now we don’t? More eye rolling. Revisionist history and demonizing those who aren’t like-minded. Yep, seems pretty typical to me.

  • Jane F.

    This is ridiculous. My grandparents who were born in 1890 lived on farms (both sides). The family was valued as workers. My grandmothers had no time to frolic in the wildflowers with their children. They were busy gathering eggs, milking (twice a day) growing and preserving fruits and vegetables. And this doesn’t even take into consideration that they had to wash and cook for hired hands. As mechanization grew, the physical labor became less, but they still didn’t frolic about holding hands. These people were hard working, God fearing, but they were an economic unit. Most marriages around the world are an economic unit. When women were finally freed to have careers that paid well, this changed, I acknowledge that. But it doesn’t make the lifestyle that went before some idyllic floating just this short of heaven existence.

  • jason55

    I too could only watch until my gag reflex kicked in. My parents each came from families of twelve children and grew up during the Depression. My father went to work in the fields after 6th grade and my mother was the only high school graduate from her class. They and their siblings went on to have families of mostly 2-3 children. Clearly the large family had everything to do with farm labor and little to do with an idyllic way of life.

  • Karin

    Yes I have to laugh because my grandparents both were from huge familes. They have some pretty horrific tales of abuse, hard work and even spiritual abuse. Life was hard. My great grandmother looks very OLD and she was only 45 in this one picture I am thinking about. Most of their children only had a few children. My grandmother’s sister (who was a 2nd mother to all of her siblings) never married or had children, BECAUSE she had already done it and never had a chance to live her own life!!!

    Further more, when physical needs demanded it- some husbands and wives stopped having sex, just to stop having more children (at least until the wife was through childbearing age). My great-grandmother on my mom’s side almost died after her 6th child and so they quit having children. There is no ‘nice’ way to put that. They loved eachother dearly and I am sure were intimate in some way- but if they wanted her to survive- she could not have more children. I think Quiverfull families forget some of these things.

    Why don’t they apply the same “God is in control of everything, we have no choice” to other areas where logically it should apply- like health? Why get treatment for sickness, cancer, etc?

  • africaturtle

    ugh… i just cant handle the dramatic music. It reeks of emotional manipulaion.

  • madame

    I watched the whole thing.
    The music was not very good. Too dramatic, as AT said.
    I hate the black and white thinking and I hate the narrowmindedness that comes across throughout the whole film.
    As others have already said, a large family doesn’t come hand in hand with a beautiful large house, with all the solid furniture and appliances, a wonderful playground-like yard and enough money to be able to afford pianos and braces.
    I hate the romantic portrayal of the rich and fortunate QF family. The reality is, most QF families are not going to have the lifestyle portrayed in this film. Most are going to live in cramped conditions and barely make it. And PLEASE, don’t use your kids like that! That made me so sick!!!!
    A new sibling is not the best gift you can give your children.Your LOVE, dedication, attention, TIME, that is the best gift.

    I’m not against having a large family, but don’t tell me that using contraception makes me an evil person who doesn’T trust God. There are enough situations that require my trust in something, and often that is God.
    Enough said.

  • Antane

    What the What? This made me feel a a little slimy inside my brain. sadly, we all know that some people will in fact be swayed by this saccharine, overdone piece of nonsense.
    Oh and the child gently lisping in her southern accent about the millions of babies that have been aborted on this country? Absolutely disgusting.

  • Independent Thinker

    I couldn’t help but think the exact same thing. I would love to see this family move to a big city like New York or San Francisco live there for two years then make a film.

  • Independent Thinker

    I actually forced myself to watch the whole film just to be fair when posting. While I do not agree with much of what Margaret Sanger believed her main purpose of starting Planned Parenthood and supporting birth control methods orginated from seeing children grow up in extreme poverty. I was blessed to go to five years of college. This “movie” somewhat connects the idea that children create wealth because one gains favor by having children in gods eyes. That is one heck of a leap. As many others have stated some if not most quiverfull families experience extreme poverty and raise children with shoe string resources. Exactly what Margaret Sanger was trying to prevent. I find it ironic that she is quoted so frequently by those within the Quiverfull movement.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X