Lilith’s Compost Pile

Consequently the two are sometimes at odds. However, Ishtar knows that in order to keep a civilization running, you sometimes have to do the dirty work. To keep order, you have to make a place for the liminal, the outsider, and the wild, lest your order become sterile and cruel. In order to have a fruitful garden, you must have decay. Lilith for her part is not always on board with all this orderly gardeny stuff, but…she is sometimes willing to grant her gifts to those who appreciate them and are willing to work for them. Besides, a real Garden is never perfect and unchanging; it is a domain of constant change, transformation, and muck, all things she favors. Compost makes things grow.

According to Anya Kless, Lilith kind of likes dirt and decay and mess. My other deities and my ancestors don’t particularly (my altar room is usually the cleanest room in my house), so she requires a space of her own. Therefore I made her an altar outside in front of my compost pile, near where a little red toad has taken up residence. I have long been a notable slayer of plants; the compost and my current collection of herbs, tomatoes, and zucchini represent the umpteenth time I have attempted to turn my black thumb to green. I keep trying. The altar is made from a board I found under my house (where I also found more frogs), and includes a clay flower pot turned on its side, some broken bricks, some stones of appropriate colors, and a shell. It is decorated with a clay owl that my son made. I get the impression that she’d rather you make something pretty out of junk than buy something new and shiny. I poured some wine into the shell earlier, and later I will go out and light some candles for her and add some more to the compost pile.

So far, my garden is growing.

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About Sara Amis

Sara Amis writes fiction, poetry, non-fiction, and rants. She is a Faery initiate who kicks it old-school, a member of Hellbender Coven, and has many opinions. Her work has appeared in Datura, Jabberwocky, Lilith Queen of the Desert, Witches and Pagans, Moon Milk Review, A Mantle of Stars, and her blog, the Consequence of Chance. Her poem series The Sophia Leaves Text Messages was published as an artist's book by Papaveria Press. She teaches Tarot and magic sometimes.

  • http://krasskova.weebly.com/blog.html Galina

    This has absolutely nothing to do with Lilith, but I am so envious that you have a toad. :) I have been trying to draw them into my garden all spring and summer, even set up little toad houses but so far, no luck.

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  • Sara A.

    The toad is wee! and cute. I think it’s a Southern toad, as they are the right red-brick color. One of my witchy friends and I have both had visitations from red toads; she found one in the middle of her kitchen after making a momentous decision. We have decided to declare them good omens :)

  • http://krasskova.weebly.com Galina Krasskova

    The Toad actually is a symbol of good luck in many traditions. :) I like them a lot. i’m still hoping that one turns up in my own garden at some point!

  • lilypaddy

    Great article Sara! I also have a red toad, he has taken up residence in one the fairy houses in Danu’s fairy village. There are other toads living there as well, but this little guy really stands out with his red color. He makes me smile when he sticks his head out to say “Hello”!

  • http://fmjemena.livejournal.com/ FMJemena

    Dear SaraL

    Ms. Lily Kunning (WitchMom) shared with her readers your link. I asked her about Lilith, you see. (“Tangible Witchcraft: Devotional Mask-making, Part 1 )

    Thank you for this article. As I told Ms. Lily, I couldn’t help smiling and laughing inside as I read about your Lilith.


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