We Always Have Hope

I’ve been thinking a lot about Pandora lately. About how she let all the evils of the world, all the miasma, tragedy, depression, heartbreak, anger and violence just floated away. All she kept was hope. I know a lot of folks interpret this as a an Eve-esque story of woman inflicting evil on the world. It’s true in Greek mythos Pandora, the all-gifted, is the first woman, but I don’t think she inflicted evil on the world. I think she taught us how to let go.

It’s a valuable gift, the ability to let go. We let go when we meditate. We let go when we dance with abandon. We let go when we make love. We let go in religious ecstasy. We let go when we forgive.

Anger, stress, worry, and anxiety aren’t good for our health. They can lead to more serious medical problems if we don’t learn to deal with them. If we don’t learn to let go.

Sometimes we don’t want to lose those feelings, those pressures. Sometimes they are comfortable, sometimes they feel necessary. The tools we have to let go of them feel like a selfish indulgence. Can we really afford 15 minutes of meditation when we have a report due, kids to be fed and laundry piling up?

I think the story tells us when we let go, we’re not left with nothing. Letting go leaves us with room for hope. Maybe that doesn’t seem like much, but it’s hope that keeps us moving forward, keeps us building, growing and learning. If you have to hold on to something, you do worse than to hang on to hope.

Sculpture by Harry Bates. Photo: Lee M Wikimedia CC

About Star Foster

Polytheistic Wiccan initiated into the Ravenwood tradition, she has many opinions. Some of them are actually useful.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Lamyka-L/649965363 Lamyka L.

    Thank you, Star. This really made my day!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Lamyka-L/649965363 Lamyka L.

    Thank you, Star. This really made my day!

  • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

    I’ve often said “We live in hope,” or “on hope,” and I certainly think it’s true; but, I also know that hope alone isn’t enough.

    I heard about something rather intriguing in relation to hope.  At the Findhorn community in Scotland (which I’ve visited a few times), something they do rather a lot of is talk about angels, and they have these angel card decks all over the place, so people “take an angel” when they buy something at the shop, etc.  They also turn up in more specifically spiritual exercises and practices, like the Game of Transformation.  I think there are something like 72 different angels represented, and they are everything from “Play” to “Adventure” to “Beauty” to “Communication” to “Abundance,” and many others besides.  There was great debate more than 30 years ago, however, when this specific practice began, on whether or not to include “Hope” as an angel.  And, in the end, it was decided that it should not be included, because it is possible to have false hope, whereas it’s not generally possible to have “false play,” and it is all too easy for people to lose themselves in hope in an almost escapist-like fantasy.

    And, taking the original Greek story of Pandora in context, it is well to remember:  the things locked up in the box are all daimones, and hope itself is a daimon, and thus should be treated very carefully and cautiously.

    It’s not to rain on your parade here, by any means!  I’m just attempting to nuance the situation a bit more with various examples; like almost everything, there’s a good side and a bad side to Hope.

    The Roman deified abstraction Spes (“Hope”) had various cults and representations, and had a festival on August 1.  Perhaps it would be good to revive that?

  • P. Sufenas Virius Lupus

    I’ve often said “We live in hope,” or “on hope,” and I certainly think it’s true; but, I also know that hope alone isn’t enough.

    I heard about something rather intriguing in relation to hope.  At the Findhorn community in Scotland (which I’ve visited a few times), something they do rather a lot of is talk about angels, and they have these angel card decks all over the place, so people “take an angel” when they buy something at the shop, etc.  They also turn up in more specifically spiritual exercises and practices, like the Game of Transformation.  I think there are something like 72 different angels represented, and they are everything from “Play” to “Adventure” to “Beauty” to “Communication” to “Abundance,” and many others besides.  There was great debate more than 30 years ago, however, when this specific practice began, on whether or not to include “Hope” as an angel.  And, in the end, it was decided that it should not be included, because it is possible to have false hope, whereas it’s not generally possible to have “false play,” and it is all too easy for people to lose themselves in hope in an almost escapist-like fantasy.

    And, taking the original Greek story of Pandora in context, it is well to remember:  the things locked up in the box are all daimones, and hope itself is a daimon, and thus should be treated very carefully and cautiously.

    It’s not to rain on your parade here, by any means!  I’m just attempting to nuance the situation a bit more with various examples; like almost everything, there’s a good side and a bad side to Hope.

    The Roman deified abstraction Spes (“Hope”) had various cults and representations, and had a festival on August 1.  Perhaps it would be good to revive that?


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X