Bible fail: Book of Genesis wrong about camels

Abraham never rode a camel. Recent scientific findings show the Bible is historically inaccurate. The findings should come as a surprise to no one.

Archeologists have offered convincing evidence that camels, once thought to be the basic mode of transportation for the biblical patriarchs, were not domesticated in Israel until hundreds of years after Abraham, Isaac and Jacob are said to have wandered the earth.

The findings challenge the veracity of the Bible as a historical document.

Archaeologists Erez Ben-Yosef and Lidar Sapir-Hen of Tel Aviv University released a new study that dates the arrival of the domesticated camel in the eastern Mediterranean region to the 10th century B.C. at the earliest, based on radioactive-carbon techniques. Abraham and the patriarchs, however, lived at least six centuries before then.

The evidence directly contradicts the historical timeline presented in the Bible. However, this is not the first time, and probably not the last time, that flaws, historical and otherwise, have been discovered in the Bible. Indeed, scientific findings suggesting the Bible is not a historically accurate document should not come as a surprise to any reasonable person.

Yet the new scientific findings showing that the Book of Genesis is wrong about camels is unlikely to change the minds of fundamentalist who insist that the Bible is “the inerrant and infallible Word of God.” Such individuals have already demonstrated an uncanny ability to ignore any scientific evidence that contradicts their religious superstition.

Abraham never rode a camel.

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