Christians panic after judge strikes down Virginia’s same-sex marriage ban

Conservative Christians are in a panic after a federal judge in Virginia struck down the state’s prohibition on same-sex marriage. Religious opponents of marriage equality condemned the decision as an infringement on their religious freedom and vowed to take the issue to the Supreme Court.

However, Christian conservatives are clearly losing the battle, and the Bible Belt is under siege. The New York Times reports:

If the Court of Appeals upholds Thursday’s decision, the repercussions in the South, where opposition to same-sex marriage has been strongest, could be wide. Restrictive state amendments would most likely be voided in other states of the Fourth Circuit, including North Carolina, South Carolina and West Virginia. (Maryland, the fifth circuit member, approved same-sex marriage in 2012.)

And Slate reports “It’s Over, Gay Marriage Can’t Lose In The Courts”:

There have been 18 lower court cases addressing gay rights since (the Supreme Court overturned the Defense of Marriage Act), and equality has won them all unanimously; not one of the 32 judges who heard those cases has dissented. State attorneys general and governors have reached the same conclusion, and are increasingly declining to defend their bans.

The ruling has angered many of those on the religious right who hide their bigotry and hatred towards the LGBT community behind terms like “family values” and “religious liberty.” After the ruling, Virginia Del. Robert G. Marshall (R-Prince William), co-author of the ban, immediately called for the judge’s impeachment in a speech on the House floor.

Marshall argued that same-sex marriage upends “thousands of years of societal disapproval of certain sexual behavior” and contradicts “moral teachings of major religions’ sanctions against homosexual activity.”

However, in striking down Virginia’s ban on same-sex marriage, Federal District Court Judge Arenda L. Wright Allen opened her opinion with a lengthy quote from Mildred Loving, one of the plaintiffs in the 1967 Supreme Court decision striking down Virginia’s law prohibiting interracial marriage. The reference is an eloquent rebuttal to those who would use their religious superstitions to deny others the right to marriage. The following is an excerpt:

The older generation’s fears and prejudices have given way, and today’s young people realize that if someone loves someone they have a right to marry. . . . Government has no business imposing some people’s religious beliefs over others.

Judge strikes down Virginia’s same-sex marriage ban
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What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • Rod Haney

    They can whine and cry all they want. The days of religiously sanctioned bigotry and oppression are being left behind.

    • Oh!

      Oh,dunno bout that though it would be a good thing. People over the millenia have gone from one religion to another. We never seem to learn. I do hope you’re correct, however….

  • TwoReplies

    Religious people need to GROW UP and learn their religious rights DO NOT include dictating to other people who they can and can’t marry.
    Religious rights are INDIVIDUAL, and so END at each individual.

  • RegularJoe

    Oh no! Poor repressed Christians. I feel so terrible for them, what with them having to….wait, what’s that you say? It doesn’t affect their lives at all? Oh, okay….then fuck ’em.

  • Kerri Faith Kellerman

    hey. christian supremacists: gay marriage predates christianity by several thousand years. if you believe persecution is your right as a religious person (read: hypocrite), what happens when someone else’s god becomes more popular than yours? we have no right to forget how religions behaved when they were powerful and believed god was on their side. historical temper tantrum as evidence.

  • Jacobb Chapman

    “The United States was not, in any sense, founded on the Christian religion”

    – Treaty of Tripoli signed by John Adams.

    “Christianity neither is, nor ever was, the rule of the common law”

    – Thomas Jefferson

    Saying you’re against gay marriage because it goes against your religion won’t hold up in court. We aren’t a Christian Nation, and Christianity doesn’t make the laws of the land. In the end, the constitution will always win against religion and there’s nothing you can do about it.

    • NE John

      Hell yea, figuratively

  • TheSquirrel

    Good.

  • Josef

    Why are Christians panicking? Do they think that they will have to marry a person of the same sex?

  • Phil B.

    Christianity: Not letting them shove their religion down your throat and tell you how to live your life = Persecution.

  • WOG with Attitude

    Always like to hear positive news where the cra cra bigots are losing their insane holy war. Hope the nation keeps making strides in this direction. If someone tried to legslate that Christians praise Allah and bow to Mecca, they would be appalled…that’s a natural reaction against anyone trying to force an unwanted religious belief on them. Shame on the so-called Christians for trying to run the world by their false beliefs.

  • Peter Naus

    For me, the marrow hidden at the centre of this whole juicy bone of backwardness and bigotry is the knowledge that the SCCs (so-called Christians) comfort and support through all this, the King James Bible, was “translated” for the flaming homosexual, King James.

    Do you want to tell them, or can I?