American Taliban: Utah modesty police edit girls’ yearbook photos

Female students at a public high school in Utah are angry after their yearbook photos were secretly edited by school administrators to cover up bare arms and modest necklines.

The female students at Wasatch High School were surprised and angry to find that their yearbook photos had been edited to reveal less skin, and upset that the decision to make alterations in their yearbook photos was not consistent.

In one case, two different girls were wearing nearly identical tops: one photo was altered to add sleeves and the other was not.

“My shirt was a cream color, and the color of the cover-up was completely white,” sophomore Kimberly Montoya said of the sleeves added to her picture. “It looked like white-out on my skin.”

Administrators claim the students knew about the dress code’s modesty requirements, and also claim that students were warned that their pictures might be edited.

Taking a defiant stance, the Wasatch County Superintendent would only admit the school erred in not applying the same rules to each student.

“We only apologize in the sense that we want to be more consistent with what we’re trying to do in that sense we can help kids better prepare for their future by knowing how to dress appropriately for things,” said Terry E. Shoemaker, who is the superintendent of schools for the Wasatch County School District.

However, critics find the unauthorized photoshopping of the girls yearbook photos deeply disturbing, and reflect the power of the notorious Mormon modesty police in the state of Utah.

Indeed, the tactics of the public school administrators are reminiscent of a repressive middle eastern theocracy, rather than a state in the heartland of the U.S.A.

The actions and policies of the Wasatch County School District are clearly sexist, misogynistic, and symptomatic of the repressive and dysfunctional nature of religious patriarchy.

 

Modesty police edit photo to cover bare shoulders.

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