Jihad me at hello

Counter-intuitively, a growing number of females participate in Jihad.

They martyr themselves for a religion that is so oppressive to women that it instructs them to wear burqas. Some women’s beautiful eyes made even a burqa too immodest. Why would women want 72 virgins? Why would they want eternal erections?

I think humor is one of the strongest weapons you can use against terrible ideas. Forgive the potentially jarring lack of a proper segue into more serious discussion.

Show me the rupees

Many organizations affiliated with Islamic terrorism will financially reward the families of so-called martyrs of the Jihad. This is in large part because the typical suicide bomber is a young male, and a significant breadwinner in his household.

But there is an element of surprise (tactically speaking) to using a child or a woman. I suppose this is why Hamas TV recently ran a propaganda piece celebrating females in the Jihad movement. The video gets especially depressing near the end when they flash through the faces of young women in their goodbye videos. One female suicide bomber was holding a small child, presumably just before her death.

http://www.youtube.com/embed/l6VlMtA9X6w?

Why hasn’t women’s liberation swept through the Arabic nations yet?

(**edit: Obviously, there are people trying to make it happen. Have some money? Donate here or here. No money? Just get informed, and get vocal.**)

Why does it often take atheists to correct oppressive extremist religious doctrine?

Words can’t describe the feelings I get when I look at this image.

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About Justin Griffith
  • papango

    “Why hasn’t women’s liberation swept through the Arabic nations

    yet?”

    That’s pretty easy to ask from where you’re sitting. (Although maybe you could ask the huge number of women due to be murdered by their partners this year why they’re still helping their male oppressors, or those denied reproductive rights by right-wing religion).

    There are actually a number of women’s movements through-out the Arab, and the wider Islamic, world. But they are often small and local and if I’m really honest, making people in our position aware of them may not be tyhe best use of their limited resources. They also face an uphill battle in traditionally male-centric cultures (although I understand wife beating is now legal in Kansas, so maybe the struggle is not so different) and activist often face threats, violence, social isolation and even death. For most of these groups dealing with issues around sexual violence (and regular old violence), and basic human rights far out-rank any desires to completly overthrow the religion. And they are mostly local struggles, you’re not going to hear much about the Malaysian Womens Aid Organisation or the Palestinian Centre for Human Rights unless you actually need them (and in the case of the PCHR, you’ll also need to speak Arabic).

    The idea that Arab (or Muslim) women are nothing more than victims of religious oppression waiting for brave athiests to stride in and save them is obnoxious and simplistic.

    • Justin Griffith

      I actually had originally included a much more nuanced approach to that last question, raising many of the points you did during drafting. But it was getting longwinded for a blog post.

      I left that question in frankly hoping to prompt exactly this type of discussion. You are spot on about the obnoxious and simplistic accusation, so all apologies.

      Thank you for the heads up on MWAO and PCHR. I’ll edit in some links in a bit.

      • papango

        The MWAO does great work. And they’re are a non-religious group, mostly because they need to reach Malaysia’s minorities who are often not Muslim.

        I think women who join jihad need to be considered as agents in their own right. It’s my personal opinion that all jihadis are duped and used by warped religion, but that’s probably not going to change the mind of anyone actually considering it. Better to pick away at the circumstances (which are often religious and social as well as economic) that make it a rational choice. And most often that means working within the current situation to make small changes, which from the outside can look almost insignificant.

        • Justin Griffith

          Exactly. Well said.

          Edited in some links and clarity. Thanks!

    • Justin Griffith

      Also, FYI… I do get a regular stream of death threats. I’ve even received many threats of physical violence from fellow soldiers simply because I’m a vocal atheist. Obviously, it’s a different subject, but I do sympathize.

      Suicide bombers (regardless of gender) are often targeting my fellow soldiers. Thank you for playing whatever part you do in the struggle against this mentality.

      • papango

        I used to get those a lot of those in my old job at the Ministry of Justice. Some jackass rang several times threatening to come and rape me in the bath (Jokes on him. I make civil servant wages; I can’t afford a flat with a bath). I am privileged to be in a position not to have take the threats seriously.

        Also, in New Zealand religion is a source of mumbling embarrassment, my neighbour would be less uncomfortable if I started talking about my ovarian cyst than he would if I wanted to talk about Jesus. So we don’t really have the nastiness about atheists as much here.

  • http://lapalma-island.com Sheila Crosby

    I don’t think all of them are volunteers. I seem to remember hearing (sorry, can’t remember where) that quite a few of them are widows, and they’re told, “Well look after the kids for you if you do this, and we’ll murder you AND the kids if you don’t.” Some time ago, the BBC carried a story about an Afghani girl who escaped by dumb luck when her father and older brother were trying to force her to become a suicide bomber. I seem to remember that she as 13, and that her older sister had already been forced to blow herself up.

    Sickening.

    On the other hand, I heard (again I can’t remember where, sorry) that quite a few Chechen suicide bombers, and the women involved in that awful attack on a school were volunteers all right. They’re kids had been killed by the Russian military. I’m horrified, but I sort of understand.

    I wish I could provide some backup for this. And I’m sure some women are brainwashed into volunteering. Just not all of them.

  • Woody Tanaka

    I think that this is a serious subject, but one thing that cannot be overlooked is that fact that in many cases, there are legitimate grievances that these women have. The occupations, crimes, situations and political realities which cause these people to beleive that actions of this type are the only viable reaction, often target women as much as or more than men. Change the actions of the west (The US and Israel, especially) against the people in this part of the world, and many of these actions will decrease.

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