Rumors about Bush converting to Catholicism

Apparently, there are rumors that George W. Bush might be thinking of converting to Catholicism.

Interesting. If true, I wonder if the attraction is to a kind of theocon authoritarianism that often shows itself in the Catholic hierarchy. If you want a tradition with a long history, intellectual depth (not incompatible with being basically bullshit), heavy-handed social conservatism, and strength of organization and numbers, conservative Catholicism might be the way to go, after all.

About Taner Edis

Professor of physics at Truman State University

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/06394155516712665665 CyberKitten

    It’s strange to think why he would feel the need.

    Maybe he’s being converted by Tony Blair?

    Or maybe he’s looking to have all of his (many) sins absolved?

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/09010421115826273321 Rourke

    While moderate Catholics aren’t bad — I can say this from personal experience — I also completely agree that conservative Catholicism would make sense (for Bush) and be bad (for us). And your comment about Catholicism’s “intellectual depth” being bullshit is quite accurate. I go to a school named after Aquinas, and we’ve had to suffer through a bit of his so-called “logical” crap that’s, oh, 734 years out of date.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/03743116454273042629 Sheldon

    Actually, it wouldn’t make sense at all, but if Bush had converted to Catholicism 8 years ago, then maybe it would have saved us and Iraqis alot of trouble. That is, the last dead Pope, John Paul the whatever, was against the Iraq war, and would have told Bush not to invade.

    But instead, Bush got his divine directions from his own imaginary God wispering in his ear that he should invade.

    So I guess the moral of the story is, sometimes religious authorities have better advice than direct advice from imaginary Gods.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05211466026535549638 Bradley Bowen

    Having been an Evangelical Christian for a decade of my life, I have no great love for Catholicism. However, some of the best recent scholarship on the historical Jesus comes from Catholic scholars. Also, contrary to Rourke, Aquinas was a brilliant Christian philosopher. I was recently reading Aquinas on miracles, and his thinking on that topic was quite impressive. If just one out of 100 Christians thought as clearly and deeply as Aquinas on key issues (existence of God, revelation, and miracles) this country (U.S.) would be a much saner place.