LINK: Leah Libresco of Unequally Yoked Converts from Atheism to Catholicism

I had never heard of her before this, but Leah Libresco of the blog Unequally Yoked has converted from atheism to Catholicism. It appears a big factor in her conversion was her belief that the Moral Law is a person.

I hope that nontheists will (1) not commit the “No True Scotsman” fallacy and deny she was ever an atheist; and (2) be nice to her.

LINK (HT: Paul Fidalgo)

Update: Apparently her conversion is now being reported by MSNBC News.

About Jeffery Jay Lowder

Jeffery Jay Lowder is President Emeritus of Internet Infidels, Inc., which he co-founded in 1995. He is also co-editor of the book, The Empty Tomb: Jesus Beyond the Grave.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/12132821431322748921 LadyAtheist

    I bet she never ate Haggis!

    I've never read her blog but her "reasons" don't seem convincing to me. It's hard to believe that an atheist would ascribe agency to morality when there's so much evidence to the contrary.

    She may have been a "true" atheist, but I suspect a lazy one.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/16342860692268708455 Angra Mainyu

    Thanks for the link; I did not know her (I recall posting once on her blog, though), but I have no reason to doubt that she was an atheist.

    I just read the story of her conversion, and this looks like an example of the damage caused by metaethical arguments and the confusion they cause.

    While those arguments, if successful, would only establish theism and not Catholicism, for some reason conversions are almost never conversions to some generic theism.

    Not that they're anywhere near successful. But people usually do not understand the arguments, and get confused by them.

    I guess such is life.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/17161621090445639028 Aragorn

    The way I see it is that for her, the grounding (or lack thereof) of objective morality is a deal-breaker. Because as far as agency is concerned, we can't even say with certainty that there's objective morality, much less imbue it with agency. I can understand how this could happen(for a time, mine was "ultimate meaning") even as I also understand how a simple cognitive maneuver can remove that block (why is objective morality/ meaning necessary?).

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/14288435564500319699 Rayndeon

    I don’t know anything about this blogger and I cannot say I agree with her reasons for converting, but if she felt that this was what she “had to do” per se, given her viewpoints, then so be it. I don’t think her sentiment is entirely uncommon either – probably a number of atheists are faced with similar questions as hers and feel that atheism simply does not measure up in answering those questions. Call it a “crisis of disbelief” if you will. It sounds like she had an extended one. She perhaps felt that there was a “God-shaped hole” in her life, and she needed belief in a personal deity to make sense of it all. Perhaps, perhaps not.

    From what some people appear to be saying, she either had Catholic friends or was extremely influenced by a number of Catholic beliefs and what not while an atheist, so I suppose it was just a matter of time. It does not sound like she had been given a reasoned defense for her naturalistic views, so she chose, on the basis of the evidence and appeals before her, what made more sense to her. Whether this is a rational or irrational decision, or whether if it is or isn't even matters, is itself a question of debate I won't attempt pass judgment on.

    I am somewhat baffled, like some persons, that she would choose as specific a religion as Catholicism, especially given her views on homosexuality. I would have thought that Episcopalianism or the like would be more to her taste.

    I don't believe God or gods exist, but if I did come to believe that a Divine being did exist, I would probably never associate it with the traditional God of the Tanakh, Gospels, or Qur'an. For whatever can be said of such a deity, it cannot be called "good" and the obfuscatory sophistry of elsewise intelligent theistic philosophers and apologists to frantically make "compatible" the idea of God and the concept of Hell, or the various atrocities and iniquitous moral canards and abominations such texts support is contemptible in and of itself. The capricious and monstrous being described in those texts could not and cannot be God, if He were to really exist.

    That said, I suspect that she was highly attracted to the structured, ritualistic aspects of Catholicism. There is also a strong scholarly tradition that may have appealed to her.

    Maybe, maybe not. Whatever the case, my speculation means little and I am in no position to judge the sincerity, worthiness, or epistemic value of her belief.

    I wish her best of luck. Hopefully she finds support from theists and atheists alike.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/16484911353167245584 ___________________________

    Leah both had Catholic friends and was very influenced by Catholic theological ideas.

    And yeah, I really can't say I am a friendly atheist. Y'know, except to the theisms most divorced from these historical religious traditions, and that always makes the conversions the other way more incomprehensible.


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