Index: The Evidential Argument from Physical Minds (APM)

The purpose of this page is to provide an index for my blog series on the evidential argument against theism based on the dependence of human minds upon physical brains.Part 1: an overview of the argument Reply to "Bilbo" on APM Victor's Anti-Naturalistic Argument from PainSee also:Carrier and Wanchick debate: Argument from Mind-Brain Dysteleology … [Read more...]

Index: Draper’s Evidential Argument from Biological Evolution

The purpose of this page is to provide an index for my blog series on Paul Draper's evidential argument against theism based on biological evolution.Part 1: a summary of the argument Part 2: a critical assessment of William Lane Craig's attempt to turn the tables on Draper and argue that evolution is evidence favoring theism over naturalism.See also:Summary and Assessment of the Craig-Draper Debate on the Existence of God (1998) "Religious Experience and the Evidential Argument … [Read more...]

Index: Draper’s Evidential Argument from Pain and Pleasure

The purpose of this page is to provide an index for my blog series on Paul Draper's classic 1989 article defending an evidential argument from evil which focuses on the biological role (and apparent moral randomness) of pain and pleasure.Part 1: summarizes key terminology for the argument, as well as the argument itself. Part 2: summarizes the first part of Draper's argument, which purports to show that facts about pain and pleasure are more probable on the hypothesis of indifference (HI) … [Read more...]

Draper on Pain and Pleasure: Part 4

This post is part of a series on Paul Draper’s classic version of the evidential argument from evil. In the previous entry, I summarized Draper's refutation of three theodicies which might be used as an objection to the claim that HI explains the facts about the biological role of pain and pleasure much better than T does. In this post, I'm going to review the final section of Draper's classic 1989 article on the evidential argument from evil.1. Darwin's Argument from EvilIn the final se … [Read more...]

Draper on Pain and Pleasure: Part 3

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This post is part of a series on Paul Draper’s classic version of the evidential argument from evil. In the previous entry, I summarized Draper's first argument, which attempts to show that certain facts about the types, quantity, and distribution of pain and pleasure (P&P) are much more probable on the hypothesis of indifference (HI) than on theism (T), and so constitute strong evidence against T and for HI. In this entry, I summarize Draper's discussion of theistic explanations for those f … [Read more...]

Draper on Pain and Pleasure: Part 2

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This post is part of a series on Paul Draper's classic version of the evidential argument from evil. In the previous entry, I explained Draper's terminology and summarized the logical form of Draper's two arguments. In this entry, I focus on Draper's first argument, which attempts to show that known facts about the biological role of pain and pleasure are much more probable on the hypothesis of indifference than on the hypothesis of theism.1. Background KnowledgeLike all abductive a … [Read more...]

Draper on Pain and Pleasure: Part One

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The academic journal Nous published an article by Paul Draper in 1989 on the evidential argument from evil. (The article used to be available online for free but is now only available behind a paywall at JSTOR.) The article is now widely regarded as a 'classic' in the contemporary literature on the problem of evil; it has been republished in numerous anthologies and readers.In this part, I'll summarize the terminology he uses and provide a basic overview of the argument's logical structure o … [Read more...]

Marilyn McCord Adams on Horrendous Evils

Marilyn McCord Adams is a Christian philosopher and a former Episcopalian priest who has thought deeply about so-called horrendous evils. I define 'horrendous evils' as 'Evils the participation in (the doing or suffering of) which gives one reason prima facie to doubt whether one's life could (given their inclusion in it) be a great good to one on the whole.' Such reasonable doubt arises because it is so difficult humanly to conceive how such evils could be overcome. ...I offer the … [Read more...]


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