Catholic priest ordered to explain abortion revelations in a book about his life

Catholic priest ordered to explain abortion revelations in a book about his life March 16, 2011

SPANISH Catholic priest Manel Pousa, depicted in a new book as a complete maverick, has been ordered to explain claims that he paid for an abortion, blessed same-sex unions between prison inmates and supports “voluntary” celibacy and women priests.

Fr Manel Pousa
According to this report, the Archdiocese of Barcelona announced it has opened an inquiry to “verify” whether Fr Pousa incurred automatic excommunication when he paid for an abortion.
The revelations are contained in a book entitled Father Manel: Closer to the Earth than to Heaven, released on February 28.
Until now, Pousa said, he has only received a warning from the Archbishop of Barcelona, Cardinal Lluis Martinez Sistach.
On March 8, the cardinal issued a brief statement summoning the priest to:

Speak personally with him about some of the content of this book and to make whatever decisions are appropriate.

In a statement yesterday, the archdiocese said Cardinal Sistach, together with Barcelona’s Auxiliary Bishop Sebastia Tatlavull and archdiocesan Chancellor Msgr Sergi Gordo met with Fr Manel on March 14:

Concerning statements about abortion made by this priest in the book about him. Since according to the Code of Canon Law, cooperation in an abortion carries the penalty of latae sententiae (automatic) excommunication, the code directs that procedures must be followed to verify the facts, and therefore this administrative procedure has been initiated.

The archdiocese added that the canonical procedures are not intended to reflect negatively on:

The social work that this priest has carried out for many years in service to the neediest groups of our society.
 

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  • tony e

    I can imagine Benny XVI turning to one of his cardinals and saying ‘This man has shown compassion, understanding and humility – there can be no place for him in our church!’

  • Give that man a ‘ceegar!’
    Sounds like he might be a candidate for Dan Dennett’s new line of research;
    http://newsweek.washingtonpost.com/onfaith/Non-Believing-Clergy.pdf

  • Broga

    Now if he had been a paedophile then Ratzi might have spirited him away to a sinecure in the Vatican or a transfer to another parish.

  • Reminds me of a fairly recent story – I forget the details – about a nun IIRC who backed a life saving termination in an American hospital.
    It is remarkable how the RCC has well established mechanisms for keeping the most deplorable of their religious people within the church, and well established mechanisms for getting the decent people among them out.
    David B

  • Broga

    So they are considering “automatic excommunication” when he paid for an abortion. What about the bishop in Ireland who paid for his mistress to have an abortion? She wrote about it in her book. What about the priest who sexually abused a full school of deaf kids. And all the villainy detailed in the various reports from Ireland. What about the Cover Up King himself, the star of the show, the preacher and pontificator to the world – the one and only Ratzi? Should he be excommunicated?

  • Daz

    Dear Father Pousa,
    It’s just not good enough! Or rather, you’re too good. How many times have I told you, we will not be, in your own words in your previous letter, ‘dragged kicking and screaming into the fifteenth century’. The church has stayed happily in the fourteenth for the last seven hundred years, and we see no reason to change now.
    By acting like a normal decent human being, you are making the rest of us look even worse by contrast than we did before your exploits became known. Enclosed is a list of allowable ‘good’ behaviour. Please read it. It won’t take you long.
    Yours,
    Benny

  • L.Long

    The (insert religion) has a certain dogma and ‘truths’.
    To be in that religion you follow the dogma or else!!
    Yes the priest should definitely be Xcumunitated!!
    The problems people point out with (insert religion)is of little concern. Catlicks can ban condoms in Africa, IsLames say kill the infidel! So what! the real problem is the 3billion totally STUPID brainless frightened maroons that believe the BS!!
    I argue with (insert religion) not to change the religion but to get the people to start to think! Because there is absolutely no way we can get any change into (insert).
    The priest in question should NOT have done what he did but he should have left the religion and taken as many as he could. Because the people he ‘helped’ are still there and still believe the BS.

  • NeoWolfe

    Why would anyone assume that excommunication is a bad thing? It has to hurt, like any betrayal, but it is also a wakeup call, isn’t it? I have been through it, I lost my god, my wife, my children, my parents, my grandparents and my circle of friends, because I defied our religion. What else would it take to wake you up to the fact that you are living in slavery?
    When you are a victim of brainwash, it takes an earthquake to awake you from your sleep. Perhaps Mr. Pousa was praying for an earthquake, and his prayers were answered? Careful what you wish for. Seems he’s probably on the brink of a revelation that he has wasted his entire life in a vane pursuit. He won’t be the first.
    NeoWolfe

  • Gees, an honest cleric! This is a rare thing and one that must be preserved, or no one will believe such a thing has ever existed. Here’s what we do, take the good father to say Hong Kong and dip him into a big vat of clear PVC and then he’ll be preserved, like in amber and can be put on display somewhere, perhaps Times Square. I’m a wee bit surprised that someone in the roman catholic cult can actually read. It’s only a suggestion of intellegence.

  • tony e

    @NeoWolfe,
    I was unaware that when you left your religion that you had lost everything that was dear to you. I don’t think I would have had the same level of courage had I been in a similar situation. I hope one day your family respect the sacrifice you made.

  • Broga

    @tony e: I felt similarly to yourself when I read what Neo Wolfe had lost. As an atheist since my teens, married to an atheist, with atheist children (now grown up) I am sure I have little understanding of what those, like Neo Wolfe, endure when they leave their religion. By coincidence, I have just heard about an aquaintance who converted to Roman Catholicism, has four children, and now decided he cannot watch what his children are being subjected to by a “strong” RC mother. She, it seems, can never impose a sufficiently strict religious regime on the children to satisfy her.
    However, the mother now has custody of the children, the father has visiting rights and, as a decent man, pays generously to support his children. This seems to me to be a kind of hell on earth. He is being bled dry to support something he detests.

  • tony e

    Broga,
    I was very fortunate myself. Despite the fact my parents were religious (one catholic, one protestant) religion was never mentioned at home. When I was 12, I told them I no longer wanted to go to church they were great and never forced me to go again. I realise how lucky I was.

  • NeoWolfe

    @Tony E, Broga,
    Thanks for the kind words, but, now I’m a freethinker, and my freedom was worth the trouble.
    The damage was done before I even went to school, but,I only felt its full effects when I made my separation. I think it’s much like quitting heroine. You have to go through hell to get to the other side. My worst regret is that as I was going through my religious withdrawals, and shoveling the shit out of my brain, that I allowed a passage of time that severely damaged my ability to re-establish a relationship with my children. One part of my mind was concluding that I was an evil person, a rebel against the true god, and until I came to the realization that all religion is bullshit, I lacked the courage to confront my family. Meanwhile, my children were being taught that I was lost to the devil.
    Tony said: “I don’t think I would have had the same level of courage had I been in a similar situation.”
    Well the truth is out, I didn’t have courage either. My own lack of conviction made things worse than they had to be. But, brainwash as an infant is a powerful thing. When your parents present an idea as the undeniable TRUTH, you don’t doubt it, you believe it. They are your teachers of the rules of survival. And to remove that brainwash, it’s not like sending in a team of janitors to mop up a spill, it’s a matter of sifting through every file in your brain, one by one, and tossing out the shit that does not pass the litmus test.
    I am reminded of the situation in Japan, for two reasons:
    1) It’s a mess that cannot be cleaned up overnight
    2) Every time such a megadisaster occurs, after all these years, a voice inside my brain asks if this is a fulfilment of the prophecies. Permanent irreversible brain damage.
    More than enough about me.
    NeoWolfe