Melbourne Musician Shelley Segal – On Radio And On Atheism!

I’m hoping I’ll see her around the Global Atheist Convention next year! Shelley Segal, whose song “Saved” has started to get some rave reviews already.

In this interview for radio 3CR, she’s talking about the upcoming “An Atheist Album” and plays an acoustic version of one of the tracks ‘Eve’ (lyrics follow after the jump):

The bible tells me I was made for and from man
And I must do for him everything that I can
I must surrender to his will, yeah I must submit
I can’t make the household decisions coz I am unfit
It tells me my place
With ever-lasting grace

The bible tells me I must be silent you can’t hear my voice
My role has been divinely defined and I have no other choice
I may not be a teacher of man, I must cover up my shame 
These are the laws of the one who in vain I cannot name
He tells me my place
With ever-lasting grace

And my punishment for wanting to learn
Is a painful birth from which I may not return

The bible tells me that I am unclean
I am impure you cannot touch me and it has nothing to do with where I’ve been
It is part of who I am, It is because I corrupt man
I was asking for it just by being a woman
He tells me my place
With ever-lasting grace

And my punishment for wanting to learn
Is a painful birth from which I may not return

The bible tells me I was made for and from man
And I must do for him everything that I can
I must surrender to his will, yeah I must submit
I can’t make the household decisions coz I am unfit
It tells me my place
With ever-lasting grace.

About Kylie Sturgess

Kylie Sturgess is a Philosophy teacher, media and psychology student, blogger at Patheos and podcaster at Token Skeptic. She has conducted over a hundred interviews including artists, scientists, politicians and activists, worldwide.
She’s the author of the ‘Curiouser and Curiouser‘ column at the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry website and travels internationally lecturing on feminism, skepticism, and science.

  • Andrew

    You’re on the ball, I missed this interview the other day so I’m grateful to you for putting this up, really love the song ‘ Saved’ from an atheistic viewpoint, but more so I am pleased that this talented artist is another female voice getting her message out in the world. Great work!!

  • Grammar Merchant

    “It’s not really a worldview. It’s more like a rejection…” Very true, and thanks to her for saying so. I have been an atheist since at least the age of ten, and I’ve never seen it as an ideology. I’m not selling anything, I’m just not buying what’s for sale. Good on you, Shelley Segal!

  • Jason

    I’m very impressed with what I’ve seen of her so far – looking forward to the release of her album!

  • Emmet

    An atheist song based on a fundamentalist reading of the Bible…

    Always makes me chuckle when atheists read the Bible literally – as literally as any fundamentalist.
    Catholics read it differently, knowing that the Bible can’t interpret itself, and needs to be read in the light of Church teaching – teaching expressed briefly in the late Pope John Paul II’s “Letter to Women”:
    “Thank you, every woman, for the simple fact of being a woman! Through the insight which is so much a part of your womanhood you enrich the world’s understanding and help to make human relations more honest and authentic.”

    Other thoughts on Segal’s lyrics: the poetry of the book of Genesis has it that the man was incomplete until the woman was created: he lacked something. That is a raising up of women, surely, not a subjugation.
    The passage about women “submitting to men” is about women making the decision to put themselves “under the mission” (submission) of the man: and what’s the man’s mission? To love the woman as Christ loved the Church, that is, by dying for her. So for a woman to “submit to that mission” is to say to her fella, “Yes, I’ll help you love me so much that you’d even be prepared to die for me.”

    So to Ms Segal I’d say this: Put aside your fundy reading of scripture and have a look at a more authentic Christian understanding of what it is to be a woman.

    It is thus my hope, dear sisters, that you will reflect carefully on what it means to speak of the “genius of women” … in order to let this genius be more fully expressed in the life of society as a whole

    http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/letters/documents/hf_jp-ii_let_29061995_women_en.html

    • Kylie Sturgess

      Guess New Zealand hasn’t got talent to boast of.
      Here’s some educational viewing in return: http://vimeo.com/24376466

    • http://www.magdalenelaundries.com/ CC

      Emmet: “Catholics read it differently, knowing that the Bible can’t interpret itself, and needs to be read in the light of Church teaching – teaching expressed briefly in the late Pope John Paul II’s “Letter to Women”:”

      Catholic religion? Oh yeah. That’s the same church teaching that forbids abortions, subjugates women, contributes to the rise of HIV/AIDS and NO POPE including your Pope John Paull II has written a letter to women about how they justify the Magdalene Asylums? What were they TEACHING WOMEN THEN?

      GENEVA (AP) – A United Nations panel has urged Ireland to investigate allegations that for decades women and girls sent to work in Catholic laundries were tortured.

      The panel said the government failed in its obligation to oversee the nun-run laundries “where it is alleged that physical, emotional abuses and other ill-treatment were committee.” It has asked for compensation for the victims. Human rights groups say young women were abused after being sent to the so-called Magdalene Laundries, a network of 10 workhouses that operated in Ireland from the 1920s to the mid-1990s. Many of the victims were teenagers who arrived as punishment for petty crimes or for becoming pregnant out of wedlock.

      The Geneva-based U.N. Committee against Torture said the Irish government “should institute prompt, independent, and thorough investigations into all allegations of torture, and other cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment that were allegedly committed” at the laundries.

      Although such abuses were publicized in films such as “The Magdalene Sisters,” Ireland has been slow to confront abuse within Catholic dioceses and church-run institutions.

      Maybe if Segals’ well-written tune isn’t to your tast, you should go check out Joni Mitchell’s song about the atrocities committed by the Magdalene Laundries on her 1994 album Turbulent Indigo. That more to your liking?

      Or maybe you should check out a course in ‘Feminism 102 – How Not To Let Your Religion Destroy Your Brain Cells And Justify Bitching About A Young Artist Who Makes A Good Case With A Great Song’.

  • Pingback: Shelley Segal’s “Eve” (And Interview) | Camels With Hammers


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