Easter Eggs, Facebook Policies And Articles With A Penguin And A Playlist (Oh My!)

So, I’m surrounded by fragments of Easter eggs and toy Angry Birds, listening to the neighbours laughing about how their kids are STILL sulking about Easter from two years ago and how someone got an egg someone else wanted and how they couldn’t handle it and how they refused to clean up any of the foil paper litter until they got their way… then when the other kid just gave up and bloody well GAVE them the egg… then they STILL threw a tantrum... Oh, why hadn’t they got an Easter egg from them this year?

I’m glad I have this beach to look at and some music listen to instead.

As Xander once said: “I like the quiet”.

Playlist:

I was also thinking about Facebook and how I had to make it clear that I wasn’t really enjoying myself for quite some time, and had culled a number of people from my friendship list over months and months, due to social media overload on a number of different outlets. However, it resulted in a number of tantrums from people I didn’t know (and thankfully a lot of support from people who did understand and had done similar firm cullings in the past).

I recently read this article on Wired and was reflecting on how outlets like Facebook aren’t really good enough for keeping in genuine touch with people:

…And I do believe that heartfelt, authentic messages can be conveyed in many different mediums and technologies: attentive phone calls, customized digital cards with sentimental Photoshopped images, text messages with thoughtfully choreographed Vine videos, and personalized songs in mp3s are just a few examples. People should choose these and any other means as long as they’re not being quick and thoughtless. Otherwise, we’re sacrificing attention and care for the type of expediency that turns maintaining important relationships into mere to-do-list items.

At stake, then, is the idea that efficiency is the great equalizer. It turns every problem into a waste-reduction scenario, but its logic has a time and a place. Social relations are fundamentally hierarchical, and the primary way we acknowledge importance is through effort. Sending laconic thank-you texts to family treats them no differently than business associates.

If you can’t be genuinely bothered to properly keep in touch with people you supposedly care about, then yes, I agree. There’s no point in pretending any further. Why tantrum?

Not that Facebook is all bad. I’ve been inspired recently by Sharon Hill’s question she posted on FB about:

“If I wanted to keep track of ghost hunting/paranormal investigator trends, what/who should I follow?”

and wondering if that should be a new project. Not that I really have the time – I’ve got half a draft of a project to finish and a few local landmarks to visit before mini put-put golf tournament. Ah, holidays.

Other things to read:

The skeptic’s sky isn’t falling either (I Doubt It blog)

Hijacking Feminism - Powerful women are introducing a new form of feminism devoid of social justice, argues Rottenberg. (Al Jazeera)

and when penguins attack.

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About Kylie Sturgess

Kylie Sturgess is a Philosophy teacher, media and psychology student, blogger at Patheos and podcaster at Token Skeptic. She has conducted over a hundred interviews including artists, scientists, politicians and activists, worldwide.
She’s the author of the ‘Curiouser and Curiouser‘ column at the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry website and travels internationally lecturing on feminism, skepticism, and science.


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