Links Du Jour – Neil Gaiman On Radio Neverwhere, Golden Girls On Marriage Week And Lifehacker Gets Chiro-crazy

Morning! It’s early on a Wednesday here and I’m working on a few projects before heading off to class and then getting a billion other things done before easter… surprisingly fewer chocolate eggs out there, I’ve noticed, but perhaps that’s because I’m leaving things so late. Even though it’s 6:21am already. Oh dear.

Over on Science Based Medicine, Dr. Amen’s Love Affair with SPECT Scans:

Daniel Amen loves SPECT scans (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography). And well he should. They have brought him fame and fortune. They have rewarded him with a chain of Amen Clinics, a presence on PBS, lucrative speaking engagements, a $4.8 million mansion overlooking the Pacific Ocean, and a line of products including books, videos and diet supplements (“nutraceuticals”).  He grossed $20 million last year.   Amen is a psychiatrist who charges patients $3,500 to take pretty colored SPECT pictures of their brains as an aid to the diagnosis and treatment of conditions including brain trauma, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), addictions, anxiety, depression, dementia, and obesity. He even does SPECT scans as a part of marriage counseling and for general brain health checkups.

Over on the JREF site, a nice story about the tidying up of Leo Igwe’s Wikipedia page that Vera de Kok and Nathan Miller took on. And Digital Cuttlefish has an even nicer poem for Marriage Week over on their site. Which reminds me (with thanks to Daniel Loxton:

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Poor Linsay Way. Over on Lifehacker, her Ask an Expert: All About Chiropractic Medicine didn’t quite go the way she expected it to…

I’m not sure if she was trying to be funny…

Over on The Atlantic (thanks to DJ Grothe), this makes me a lot happier about my modest Twitter follow count: The Internet ‘Narcissism Epidemic’ - Don’t let popularity set your standard by Bill Davidow:

Elias Aboujaoude, a professor of psychiatry at Stanford, notes that our ability tailor the Internet experience to our every need is making us more narcissistic. He observes, “This shift from e- to i- in prefixing Internet URLs and naming electronic gadgets and apps parallels the rise of the self-absorbed online Narcissus.” He goes on to state that, “As we get accustomed to having even our most minor needs … accommodated to this degree, we are growing more needy and more entitled. In other words, more narcissistic.”

[Confession, my Pinterest has practically rotted due to misuse and mostly features funny photos involving science and other people repinning recipes that are hidden on my podcast page. Feel free to suggest alternative uses for it].

Never mind. There’s always a chance to redeem yourself and Peter Singer has “Uncaged, a collection of essays about effective activism for farm animals” that’s available free for the next 2 days only on Amazon.

I’m also completely distracted by  Q&A: Neil Gaiman on the Star-Studded BBC Audioplay of Neverwhere:

Wired: What are the unique challenges of translating a work into a radio play?

Neil Gaiman: I’ve actually done several plays for the BBC over the years and have translated something I’ve already written for the BBC. First of all, I should say that the smartest and most brilliant thing that I did on Neverwhere was that when the BBC came to me, I suggested they get Dirk Maggs who had written, adapted and directed the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy adaptations after Douglas Adams wasn’t doing them anymore.

And now I’ll be heading off to studies while listening to Carol Tavris – The Science of Sex and Gender with Indre Viskontas, so I recommend doing likewise!

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About Kylie Sturgess

Kylie Sturgess is a Philosophy teacher, media and psychology student, blogger at Patheos and podcaster at Token Skeptic. She has conducted over a hundred interviews including artists, scientists, politicians and activists, worldwide.
She’s the author of the ‘Curiouser and Curiouser‘ column at the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry website and travels internationally lecturing on feminism, skepticism, and science.


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