New Article Out On CSICOP… And Yes, Lots Of People Support Vaccination

Firstly, a beautiful view:

 

Okay, take my word for it, it’s lovely. Right? Lovely, lovely. Going for a walk after this.

Firstly, huge admiration to everyone who genuinely cares about stamping out anti-vaccination efforts in this country. I do too.

Here’s the article I wrote in 2012: Wings over the Woodford Folk Festival – Protesting by Plane with the Stop The Anti-Vaccination Network – January 25, 2012. There’s even a podcast and encouragement to sign a petition.

Here’s the article I wrote in 2013: Retreating to the Church of Anti-Vaccination – Australian Media and Politicians Taking Steps to Stamp Out Pseudoscience, June 3, 2013.

As I say in the latter:

While I usually despair when it comes to mainstream media’s coverage of pseudoscientific claims, particularly when it comes to eager attitudes about (false) balance, I’ve been personally overawed by the support for vaccinations on a number of fronts. Here’s a few of the highlights.

Mainstream media coverage, as I say. And thanks to Claire Harvey of the Daily Telegraph, I got great insight into what made their #nojabsnoplay campaign happen. And I chose to share it in the column.

That second CSI article I took some time to research over the month of May, which delved specifically and explicitly on media broadcasts and political change during that period.

I honestly don’t have the time these days to write lengthily on masses of anti-vaccination topics. I just don’t. I had to limit myself due to being a full-time student, part-time tutor, periodical writer of philosophy resources – but hey, why should I feel I should have to explain myself? I don’t.

Other people do, and that’s awesome for them. Back in the day (2009-2012) I used to do things like attend (three, in fact) lectures by Meryl Dorey; tracked down the flyers that Judy Wilyman had which featured the Murdoch University campus brand, and so on. I could attend web-seminars on homeopathy, you name it. I could do podcasts in 2012 and write articles on them about StopAVN, as demonstrated above.

I’m so busy these days, that I didn’t even have an article for the April month for the CSI column.

I felt bad about that. I feel bad if I think I’m not doing enough work, even if I’m already up at 5am every morning working.

Considering the response that this article has got, it tells me more about how skeptics should be looking beyond their backyard and seeing what they can learn from other groups. It’s why I support science communication efforts, as getting a message out effectively and efficiently is important.

I also wanted to write something that pointed out that the Jabbed documentary that aired on SBS will have a forum this Wednesday (tomorrow!) at Melbourne University, and the details are here:

5th June – 5pm - Jabbed: Love, fear and vaccines
The Spot Basement Theatre, Bldg 110, Business & Economics, 198 Berkeley St (corner Pelhem St), The University of Melbourne, Carlton VIC 3053.

I was treated very kindly by the Daily Telegraph reporter who gave me the quote for the article. I think Claire Harvey, the Features Editor for the Sunday Telegraph, News Limited, is fantastic and brave, and I wanted to say it so others could know it internationally.

People can learn from that. But you have to want to learn first, I guess.

Thanks to everyone who supports me. It means a lot. And it means that I have the encouragement to go on and support others, in science, skepticism, feminism, and more.

Oh, and here’s my Ockham award. Sometimes it pays off, all this hard work.

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About Kylie Sturgess

Kylie Sturgess is a Philosophy teacher, media and psychology student, blogger at Patheos and podcaster at Token Skeptic. She has conducted over a hundred interviews including artists, scientists, politicians and activists, worldwide.
She’s the author of the ‘Curiouser and Curiouser‘ column at the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry website and travels internationally lecturing on feminism, skepticism, and science.

  • Aaron

    You’re awesome, period. Don’t let anyone get you down, especially if they’re idiots.

  • K Sturgess

    People probably (mostly?) don’t mean to be idiots, but I think they buy into things without getting all the facts sometimes. Which is another reason to limit my recent article to just mainstream media, because I really had limitations as to how much I could research in a short time and since I was blogging about it already, I focused on what the newspaper in the main had to say and touched on the impact of their campaign. It was a great campaign and I hope the impetus continues.
    Isn’t it fascinating that anti-vaccinationists are thinking of pleading religion though?


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