Gravity Is Toxic, The Earth Is Flat And I Don’t Charge You $400+ To Make Those Rubbish Claims (Unlike David “Avocado” Wolfe)

rolling eyesI have a raging, spiky headache, so it must be time to blog something here.

During the same week that Murdoch Uni featured a great talk on alternative medicine and the potential dangers, the West Australian published news that David “Avocado” Wolfe, the man who:

…claims there is growing evidence that vaccines are not safe and can permanently maim or kill and he has linked vaccines to autism.

“The damage caused by vaccines can no longer be ignored, nor can it be dismissed as a necessary evil,” his website says.

The 46-year-old also argues that gravity is toxic and that the Earth is flat, claiming pictures of the planet from space have been fabricated by NASA. His Australian tour mostly promotes nutrition, including superfoods, herbs and medicinal mushrooms.

…is coming to my town. It’s days like these the headache just spirals into a maelstrom of head-desking and staring at the ceiling because there’s only so long you can roll your eyes back and you just keep them up there for minutes at a time to save energy.

(Energy, I might add, that is not created by activating almonds – or even by solar panels slurping up the rays out of the sky only to have them disappear into oblivion, instead of providing 2.4% of the total electricity generated in Australia in 2015.)

At least the West published the views of vaccine campaigner Catherine Hughes and her effort to question why any venue would allow content that can only be compared to the genitalia of Bos taurus. I point this out as I recall how the same publication published a photo of a proud anti-vaccinating mother holding her child on the front page a few years ago, but I guess times do change. 

In short, nonsense about flat earth, gravity and so on is not only international, it’s getting imported. Like those dodgy alternative meds that we should also be questioning.

While I don’t think public venues such as (ahem, State Library of Perth) should be permitted by health authorities to have lectures by anti-vaccination proponents, there’s probably little that for-profit venues can be told to do… But I think we should let them know that these kinds of presentations are both an incredible cost of money to the public, for essentially a grab-bag of very bizarre and potentially dangerous beliefs.

If there is any consolation, the cumulative effect of being told in one expensive weekend that gravity is out to get you, that your solar power panels are a waste of money, that various salads are going to cure everything and, oh, by the way, vaccinations are not one of the benefits of modern living and help keep our kids alive let alone ourselves out of hospitals and iron lungs…

It all may result in David “Avocado” Wolfe’s audience collectively going “WTF” and ask for a refund, let alone complain to scamwatch (yes, the link is right here).

About Kylie Sturgess

Kylie Sturgess is a former Philosophy teacher, media and psychology student, blogger at Patheos and podcaster at Token Skeptic. She has conducted over a hundred interviews including artists, scientists, politicians and activists, worldwide. She regularly presents a news and current affairs show on RTRFM's The Mag (tune in on Tuesdays!).
She’s the author of the ‘Curiouser and Curiouser‘ column at the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry website and travels internationally lecturing on feminism, skepticism, and science. She files her nails while they drag the lake.