Creationist Paleontologists Discover Dinosaur Saddle

Saddle in SandGiddy up! Creationist paleontologists have discovered an ancient dinosaur saddle:

A team of creationist paleontologists from the Discovery Institute’s main field research arm announced today that they had discovered the remains of a large manmade object confirmed to be an ancient dinosaur saddle.

The Discovery Institute’s discovery was discovered in the remote Dusty Rivers area of southwestern Arizona. A spokesman for the paleontological team said that the dinosaur saddle provides irrefutable proof that man and dinosaurs lived simultaneously, as predicted by most creationist or “intelligent design” doctrines….

Dr. Booble, who received his doctorate in paleontology from the respected Holy Patriot!™ Bible University and Correspondence College of Claptrappe, Oklahoma, had embarked on the search, funded by a $2 million Discovery Institute grant….

“We were going on the assumption that evidence of man’s domestication of certain dinosaurs would have called for large fences, supports for the dinosaur corrals, so that’s what we started looking for,” said Dr. Booble. “We found a number of poles buried in several feet of sand almost immediately with the help of infrared satellite photos of the area. Then we just started digging, and boom, there it was.”

The stunning find, a large saddle Dr. Booble believes would have been used by early man in riding “a Velociraptor, or a small Stegosaurus” is in relatively good condition considering its age, which Dr. Booble estimates to be “between 6,000 and 6,500 years”.

“We haven’t yet found any human remains in the area, but that’s merely a question of time,” said Dr. Booble.

(Yes, it’s a parody. But you never know, do you?)

  • Reginald Selkirk

    The trouble with parodying Creationists is that Poe is always popping up. For instance, is this site a parody, or for realsies?:
    Giant Humans and Dinosaurs

    • Reginald Selkirk

      Another try at that link: Giant Humans and Dinosaurs

      With the change of server, any chance of adding a ‘preview’ button?

      • Daniel Florien

        Yes, that will be coming.

  • LRA

    DI finds a dinosaddle? haaaaaaaahahaaahahaahahahaaaa!!!!!!

  • Japanther

    LOL Daniel. This was obviously a paradoy when it mentioned that Discovery Institute tried to spend money on scientific research. Have they discovered anything yet? Similarly, has the ICR done any research?

    • Reginald Selkirk

      The DI has funded the Biologic Institute. To my knowledge, the BI has one research paper published, of a computer model that in no way supports Creationism.

      WHO ARE THE CREATION “SCIENTISTS”?

      by Lenny Flank

      The creationist movement also does not like to talk about the scientists who leave after being given the opportunity to do real field research. In 1957, the Geoscience Research Institute was formed in order to search for evidence of Noah’s Flood in the geological record. The project fell apart when both of the creationists involved with the project, P. Edgar Hare and Richard Ritland, completed their field research with the conclusion that fossils were much older than allowed under the creationist assertions, and that no geological or paleontological evidence of any sort could be found to indicate the occurrence of a world-wide flood. (Numbers, 1992, pp 291-293)

      A few years later, creationist biologists Carl Krekeler and William Bloom, who taught creationist biology at the Lutheran Church’s Valparaiso University in Indiana, left after concluding that a literal interpretation of Genesis was not supported by any of the available scientific evidence. Krekeler concluded, “The documentation, not only of changes within a lineage such as horses, but of transitions between the classes of verte

      Perhaps as a result of these defections, the creationist movement no longer finances or carries out any field research of any sort.

      • Reginald Selkirk

        ID: Intelligent Design as Imitatio Dei (report on the 2007 ‘Wistar Retrospective Symposium’)

        by Daniel Brooks
        February 6, 2008


        The next presentation in this session was by Ann Gauger, a microbiologist and employee of the Biologic Institute, whose presentation was entitled, “Assessing the difficulty of pathway evolution: an experimental test.” Her presentation was remarkable in part because she performed experiments and reported original data.

        She was then prompted by one of her colleagues to regale us with some new experimental finds. She gave what amounted to a second presentation, during which she discussed “leaky growth,” in microbial colonies at high densities, leading to horizontal transfer of genetic information, and announced that under such conditions she had actually found a novel variant that seemed to lead to enhanced colony growth. Gunther Wagner said, “So, a beneficial mutation happened right in your lab?” at which point the moderator halted questioning…

        • Japanther

          thanks. hilarious and intriguing. Is this from talk.origins? Is there any place with a bunch more stories like this, or did they all learn not to fund science pretty quick?

          • Reginald Selkirk

            You can find plenty of good stuff at Panda’s Thumb.

            Meanwhile, here’s another one you might enjoy, a first person report from a former Creationist geologist:
            Why I left Young-earth Creationism

            by Glenn R. Morton
            For years I struggled to understand how the geologic data I worked with everyday could be fit into a Biblical perspective. Being a physics major in college I had no geology courses.

            In order to get closer to the data and know it better, with the hope of finding a solution, I changed subdivisions of my work in 1980. I left seismic processing and went into seismic interpretation where I would have to deal with more geologic data. My horror at what I was seeing only increased. There was a major problem; the data I was seeing at work, was not agreeing with what I had been taught as a Christian.

            Go read the whole thing, it’s quite moving.

            • dr.R.

              Moving? He got “pulled back from the edge of atheism”, that was a bit of an anticlimax.

  • http://iwant2knowyourstory.blogspot.com/ Niva Tuvia

    A dinosaur corral?! Lol. Where’s John Wayne when you need him?

    • MahouSniper

      Showdown at the OT Corral! Coming as soon as the DI funding arrives,

  • http://theangryphilistine.wordpress.com The Angry Philistine

    You know fundis are so far out there I wasn’t initially sure whether this was Poe or real. The fact that creationist paleontologists exist to begin with is ridiculous, any discovery they could possibly find would be equally ridiculous. Great story!

  • Len

    This is excellent. Hope they don’t start looking at the places where they made Jurassic Park – there were plenty of dino corals there…

    And: two refs to Poe in these comments. Who or what is Poe?

    • Japanther

      I was just about to ask that myself.

    • Joe B

      Poe’s law
      http://rationalwiki.com/wiki/Poe%27s_Law

      “Poe’s Law relates to fundamentalism, and the difficulty of identifying actual parodies thereof. It suggests that, in general, it is hard to tell fake fundamentalism from the real thing, since they may both espouse equally extreme beliefs. Poe’s law also works in reverse: real fundamentalism can also be indistinguishable from parody fundamentalism.”

  • BrianA

    As I began reading this I couldn’t help but laugh out loud. It sure looked like a Poe but, again, it is just so hard to tell sometime.

  • MahouSniper

    I liked the “several feet of sand” bit.

  • Chubbo

    ………
    :[

    I realize this is a parody, but this reminds just how much time and resources are used to try and verify ridiculous religious claims.

    On a more cheerful note, I almost got the attention of the entire top floor of my department I was laughing so hard.

  • timmy the dying boy

    That’s rich! But what if it were true? If those humans tried to ride velociraptors, there likely won’t be any remains left to speak of. And how would they get the saddle on in the first place, let alone the bridle?

    • Baconsbud

      yeah I agree that part was a little to much on the extreme side. What would have been better though would be to have a rock quarry in the story with dinos working them under direction from people. LOL

  • http://www.onyxbits.de Patrick

    Erm …. Discovery Institute? I thought they were trying to (at least in public) distance themselves from creationism in their attempt to masquerade as real scientists. Did they finally get the message, that they are not fooling anybody, so they concentrate on those beyond help again?

    • Reginald Selkirk

      They have been less particular about distancing themselves from religion since the Dover school board case. If you look up their list of “Peer-Reviewed & Peer-Edited Scientific Publications Supporting the Theory of Intelligent Design,” you will notice that they even include papers on Christian apologetics by that great scientist, William Lane Craig.

  • faithnomore

    “Dr. Booble” made it a dead giveaway.

    LOL

  • trj

    It’s a fact.

    • http://iwant2knowyourstory.blogspot.com/ Niva Tuvia

      Lol. Wow. That’s great. But how many parents in B.C. would have let their beloved children ride a real triceratops? It doesn’t seem very safe. Even with a dinosaddle.

    • dr.R.

      Of course it is a fact that man and dinosaur lived together, this was proven already years ago by the Flintstones. Duh!

  • claidheamh mor

    Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha!

    And God is *still* considered armed and extremely dangerous!

  • http://mehbooks.wordpress.com/ Bissrok

    You know, maybe the spiritual life is more fulfilling. Sure, I can watch hours of documentaries or read journals to get a general idea of what happened, and that’s nice but… then I look over and see Christians imagining the past as an episode of Dino-Riders. Honestly, I’m a little jealous. I wish I could believe that.

    Honestly, dinosaurs alone are what disproves the Bible for me. It’s really simple thing, too. In the days when the Bible was written, they didn’t know anything about dinosaurs. We weren’t even really sure what they were until about the 17th century. So, if the Bible was the word of God, he would know something the people at the time didn’t, or couldn’t. “Before I made you guys, I made some giant lizards and watched ‘em fight for a few hundred million years”. Simple, right? If they mentioned it, if they put forth knowledge that only some higher being could know, that’s a good argument for their side. But they don’t. Instead they ignore the subject completely and claim they were the first. No mention of them being around before them or at the beginning of the life. That’s something only men at the time would do.

  • ngl

    We started digging, and BAM! Average-sized saddle.

  • The Wrath of Oliver Khan

    It took me until the third paragraph to figure it out – it was the town of Claptrappe that gave it away. They don’t use that olde English spelling in Oklahoma!

  • Reginald Selkirk
    • Baconsbud

      I can’t help but laugh about that link Reginald. It is at least an attempt to fake it ok.

  • Sutebe

    Wow… They believe everyone is as retarded as them. Very sad.

  • AthestBill

    I saw a documentary on the subject of humans and dinosaurs existing simultaneously…. It was called “The Flintstones” and is often shown on Cartoon Network!

  • Bill Walker

    All this reminds me of the creationist park in Kentucky. Does anyone know how it’s doing financially ? I was among the protesters at it’s opening.

  • Bill Walker

    All this reminded me of the creationist theme park in Kentucky. Does anyone know how it’s doing financially ? I was among the protesters at its opening


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