Stealing for Jesus

There are few, if any, Christian churches or organizations I would give money to these days — I’ve been involved in a number of them, and I saw how the money gets spent. It’s amazing how much money people make and spend doing “the good Lord’s work.”

And then there’s fraud. For example, a pastor and his three sons are facing charges for preying on church members:

Former pastor Vaughn Reeves and his sons, Chip, Chris and Josh face 10 separate felony counts.

The Reeves operated Alanar, Inc. an investment company in Sullivan, Ind. The four allegedly ran a multi-million dollar, faith-based affinity fraud for at least five years that duped thousands of investors into buying bonds that raised at least $120 million.

The Reeves allegedly stole $6 million for themselves in the process.

When I was a Christian, I wanted to only do business with other Christians, because I knew they were “trustworthy.” Looking back, it’s hard to believe I thought that, even after seeing that Christians could be just as untrustworthy as non-Christians. Oh that’s right, I just labeled them as “non-Christians” when I found out they weren’t trustworthy. Sigh.

Unfortunately, I think many evangelical Christians end up being targets for manipulation. Many are very suggestible — that is, after all, how they got into their religion (if they were converts).

The problem is compounded by the teaching that they should be giving at least 10% of their income to their church and other Christian organizations. Some teach the more you give, the more you receive and will be blessed by God.

The solution, of course, is basic critical thinking. But you won’t find a class on that at most churches — if they teach that, they’ll lose members, because some will figure out how to apply it to their own faith.

So I guess they’ll just keep them as helpless sheep, blindly following their “God-appointed” shepherd.

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