A Secular Argument Against Suicide

Jennifer Michael Hecht, author of Doubt: A History, has a secular argument against suicide that was recently published in the Boston Globe. It was written in response to the suicide of two of her close friends. Here’s an excerpt:

So I want to say this, and forgive me the strangeness of it. Don’t kill yourself. Life has always been almost too hard to bear, for a lot of the people, a lot of the time. It’s awful. But it isn’t too hard to bear, it’s only almost too hard to bear. Hear me out. [...]

I’m issuing a rule. You are not allowed to kill yourself. You are going to like this, stay with me. When a person kills himself, he does wrenching damage to the community. One of the best predictors of suicide is knowing a suicide. That means that every suicide may be a delayed homicide. You have to stay. The reason I say you are going to like this is twofold. First of all, next time you are seriously considering suicide you can dismiss it quickly. Second, and this one’s a little harder to describe, if you are even a tiny bit staying alive for the sake of the community, as a favor to the rest of us, I need to make it clear to you that we are grateful that you stay. I am grateful that you stay alive.

It’s a powerful piece, read the whole thing.

Atheists at CPAC
Atheists in the Evangelical Mind
Trying On Atheism
So Much Wrong, So Little Time