In Forty Years

Swiped from Robert Cargill.

I grew up in North Carolina, the state currently at the center of this argument. My problem with this picture is that the creator assumes that most folks now accept interracial marriage. From my experience, the opposition isn’t dead, it’s merely gotten quiet.

  • UrsaMinor

    I’d be interesting in seeing some statistics on current levels of support for interracial marriage. I’m guessing that it is a majority, when aggregated on a national basis; how big a majority is the question. And I expect significant regional variation in the numbers.

    I think it will be hard to get good solid data, because people don’t feel as free to say racist things in public anymore, even to pollsters.

    • Artor

      You haven’t been listening to the Teabaggers or even mainstream Republicans lately, have you? They have no problem at all spouting virulently racist crap in public, on the news, in front of cameras, in internet comments, etc.

      • Custador

        This. The Republican party is dominated by voices of vitriol, hatred and xenophobia. It frightens me that half of American voters put their cross by those horrible fucks.

  • Woo

    These kinds of changes to be real takes a couple of generations

  • SarahElle

    This is what I’ve tried to explain to my husband, because although older generations in certain areas of the country still hang on to the biblical teaching that “unequally yoked” implies race in addition to belief systems, the majority of incoming generations and I’d venture to say MOST of our gen xers see the flaw in that logical equation. I personally believe the exact same type of emotional and intellectual evolution is going to occur. My husband (an evangelical pastor) refuses to see that. A choice he’s made because he honestly believes God hates homosexuality and will judge him harshly if he were to use god-given reason to make sense of the situation.

    • UrsaMinor

      My husband (an evangelical pastor) refuses to see that. A choice he’s made because he honestly believes God hates homosexuality and will judge him harshly if he were to use god-given reason to make sense of the situation.

      This sort of thing is the biggest evil that religious belief does. It encourages otherwise good and reasonable people to defend and sometimes act on the prescriptions of bad and unreasonable dogma.

      • Carlos Sutter

        Indeed! Right on. However, I think Steven Weinberger said it best:
        “Religion is an insult to human dignity. With or without it you would have good people doing good things and evil people doing evil things. But for good people to do evil things, that takes religion.”

  • http://about.me/mikelbutler Mikel

    I don’t think the picture assumes there aren’t people who oppose same-sex, in fact I’d say the picture reflects your sentiment. The reason why the opposition has gotten quiet is exactly because it’s become “unfashionable” to voice said opposition in public. With the increasing population of next-genners accepting the reality of mixed races, it becomes likewise increasingly unacceptable to be so vehement and vocal against the issue. So 40 years from now when the next 2-4 generations see the pictures of today’s protesters against marriage equality, they’ll likely be made to feel hopefully a little stupid when it turns the world survived and no one cares.

  • kenmeer livermaile

    I was born in S Carolina. I believe you’re right.

  • CT

    I’m in NC and me and my dh agree that it’s unlikely any law would pass here allowing interracial marriage if such a thing were permitted to be voted on.

  • Mahousniper

    Ironically, it seems to me that you see a lot more racial hatred in minorities these days than you do from white people. At least openly.

    • Custador

      I suspect it’s more generally accepted within minority demographics because there’s a them-and-us thing going on. That said ¡POTENTIALLY CONTROVERSIAL / RACIST THOUGHT WARNING! there are aspects of black culture in America that strike me as severely self-indulgent bullshit. I’m thinking particularly of some black celebrities (Whoopi Goldberg springs to mind) who refer to slave times as if they personally have suffered the indignity and heartbreak of being kidnapped and forced to work. It strikes me that there’s enough current, modern-day racism around without trying to claim retroactive societal karma points for the suffering of people long dead who you’ve never met. Indeed, like all false claims, it serves to diminish the credibility of genuine complaints.

  • Ken

    We do seem to be seeing more racist and intolerant behaviors as the 21st century progresses, and I wonder if this is simply a function of the greater access wingnuts have to disseminating their views. We know that nutjobs, like the poor, will always be with us, but they were easier to ignore when they were shouting on street corners, and the rain helped. Reading Yahoo comments is just depressing as a showcase of completely loony statements, with moderating views consistently ridiculed and assaulted.

    Armchair warriors, radical racists and economic anarchists make lively copy and videos, so they get a disproportionate amount of attention, and generate fear among the silent majority who just want to raise their kids in safety. Of course many turn to a “God” who promises peace and easy answers, even if he never truly delivers anything of the sort. Yes, Whoopi Goldberg and Bill Maher are seen as strident “radicals” by some, and there are Rush Linbaugh and Bill O’Reilly on the other side, all raising the stakes in the escalation of fear and polarization.

    The funny thing is that, like ever expanding Sunday and holiday store hours, this unsettling behavior is only possible because people with money (not singling out the GOP, but…) see all this as an opportunity to make more money. And that’s what its ALL about — more money for people who already could buy their way into heaven. Maher, Goldberg, Linbaugh and O’Reilly really are toxic waste that could very easily be contained by simply cutting them off the airways. Corporations have no problem censoring and firing dissenters in their ranks, unless, of course they make money for them.

    So, before blaming the obvious loose cannons that spew hatred and fear publicly, why aren’t we blaming the big money, church going, publicly-conservative-but-simply-greedy corporate heads that profit from all the turmoil in the name of ratings and advertising dollars. If they would really put their money where their mouths are, the tenor of the news and politics would probably get back to real, factual, news reporting and cooperation towards mutually beneficial goals. I’m really tired of all this scorched earth absolutism that is paralyzing our lives and making economic recovery just another poker chip in the great Wall Street crap game. I want politicians to negotiate and bargain, not strike dogmatic poses that are more concerned with placing blame than finding solutions.

    This concept of moderation includes stifling and being more discreet in celebrating the obvious differences between believers and non-believers. Of course believers need to be confronted when imposing their unwanted ideas. But it also means not screaming every time someone says a prayer at a function — such prayers are not intended to be inflammatory or offensive, just their accustomed groveling to their imaginary friend who never talks back to them. The idea is to lower the confrontational temperature and work on commonalities, cause the current system is not working.


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