Dear Religion

[via]

  • http://groups.yahoo.com/group/JesusMysteries/ Clarice O’Callaghan

    Like.

  • mark

    It depends on how you define productive. $2.5bn to analyze some more rock samples from Mars could be argued to be not worth the expense.

    On the other side of the equation presumably the 2bn worshiping Christians feel like they accrued some positive benefit from their activity. Maybe peace of mind, or time for reflection, or support of their community. Not sure exactly how you value that.

    • mark

      also, why pick on religion? Couldn’t this equally say Dear Atheism? After all it’s not like science and engineering are somehow the sole purview of atheists and not religious folks.

      I’m thinking this poster suffers from snark overload

      • TrickQuestion

        Need some ointment for that butthurt?

    • Kodie

      Churches enjoy tax exempt status and you are complaining what taxes are spent on and not that churches get to keep the equivalent of (I read) 28 Mars rovers expeditions per year?

      !!!!

      • Norm

        So you can only imagine the money that the church saves the government if they charged for their free services or withdrew them and left it to the government to provide for,dont worry,theyve done the sums. In Australia there are over 8800 not for profit organisations,who employ 42000 people and are assisted by 485000 volenteers.Imagine if they decided God was a myth and went home to look after number one. I would expect these figures to be multiplyed by ten in America

    • someguy

      Peace of mind? Well, minds are easily pacified when not asking questions.

  • Sam

    @Mark
    Re: ” $2.5bn to analyze some more rock samples from Mars”

    …..some *more* rock samples????
    Where have you been hiding the others that we never had because we’ve never put a rover or anything on Mars before last week, Mark??!

    • Mark Phillips

      Spirit and Opportunity, both rovers landed there in the last decade. Opportunity discovered the grey hematite spherules. They could be what we’ve needed to prove a large amount of water was on or near the surface of Mars in the past.


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