Time Magazine’s April Fools Joke

Here’s the most recent cover of the magazine that Rob Bell calls “a mainstream, credible magazine,” and thus a periodical of record for science journalism:

Seth Mnookin, co-director of MIT’s Graduate Program in Science Writing, is not impressed:

Which, of course, is completely, utterly, inarguably false. The roughly 580,000 Americans who will die this year from cancer know the reality all too well. For some context, that’s more people than will die from chronic lower respiratory diseases, strokes, accidents, Alzheimer’s disease, and diabetes combined.

That’s not to say that there haven’t been major advances in treating some types of cancer, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children, testicular cancer in men, and early-stage breast cancer in women. On the whole, however, our ability to treat solid tumors in late-stage disease remains, in the words of Nita Maihle, the director of Yale’s Biology of Reproductive Tract Cancers Program, “abysmal.”

Mnookin goes on to explain how this particular stunt has been done before, but that this is a particularly egregious example. This headline is misleading, wrong and cruel.

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