Cthulhu Found!

Researchers at the University of British Columbia have named two newly discovered micro-organisms after Lovecraft’s Cthulhu and Brian Lumley’s Cthylla

“When we first saw them under the microscope they had this unique motion, it looked almost like an octopus swimming,” says UBC researcher Erick James, lead author of the paper describing the new protists, published in the online journal PLoS ONE.

The octopus-like movements and appearance of both protists reminded James of the horrid Cthulhu and Cthylla, and the little protists were baptized after the two monsters. Cthulhu is often depicted as a giant, octopus-like entity with wings. Cthylla is his daughter, and has a similar appearance.

The full article with images and video of the little critters is available at PLoS One, but it’ll cost you 10d10 sanity points.

  • http://nagamakironin.blogspot.com/ Michael Mock

    Man. It’s been years since I had to roll for Sanity damage.

    • Elemenope

      Nyarlathotep sneezes. Roll 10d10 sanity damage!

  • Reginald Selkirk

    “When we first saw them under the microscope they had this unique motion, it looked almost like an octopus swimming,” says UBC researcher Erick James

    Learn the @#$%@#$% language. Was it unique, or was it octopus-like?

    • DSimon

      Practice your $^#%$*& logic.

      I wish everyone would stop with this “what do you mean ‘mostly unique’, it’s either unique or it’s not, herp derp gotcha” stuff, and the variations involving the words “perfect”, “unprecedented”, “ultimate”, and so on. The phrase “mostly unique” means that most but not all aspects of the subject are unique, or that the aspect being evaluated exists on an analogue scale where distinct identity is a matter of degree rather than a sharp Boolean state change.

      Kvetchers almost certainly already know how to correctly interpret such phrases, but have decided, like those “don’t end a sentence with a preposition” jerks from the previous generation, that it’s a wonderful idea to sneeringly enforce every linguistic rules they ever heard in school, even (or especially) the really useless unproductive ones.

  • DSimon

    And none of that matters for this example, because the author is referring to uniqueness in a specific context, microbes seen under a microscope. So no contradiction.

  • gratch

    Wasn’t there some nutball a while ago who had some stupid presentation about how there was this germ or virus or something that sort of looked like a cross under the microscope and that was proof of god? Hmmmm…

    • B-Lar

      Laminin – a protein found in most (non-plant based?) cells appears to be a cross if you arrange it just right, squint hard, and use your imagination.

      Louis Giglio – the nutball (wingnut, cherry-picker) to which you refer.


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