The Next Nicea

Blogger Bonesparkle over at Scholars & Rogues asks a pertinent question: in light of the bill in NC to establish religion and recent survey that shows a third of Americans wanting to establish Christianity as the official religion, exactly which form of Christianity should we be establishing?

Bonesparkle throws out some some questions that will need to be settled, perhaps by acts of Congress, in the process of establishing Christianity. Most are timeless, like the virginity of Mary, others are modern, like the question of which race Jesus belonged to. Of course, no question are going to be more fraught than questions of ritual …

Should baptism be by sprinkling as an infant or by immersion once one is born again? And, how quickly can we set in place an emergency re-baptism program for all those people that had it done wrong the first time?

… except questions of power:

What the hell do we do about those damned Jews, who have made clear that they aren’t on board with Jesus as the Son of God? Do we wait and let Jesus deal with them himself or should we set about making them either believe what we believe or leave?

And don’t even get me started on Muslims, Buddhists, Hindus, Mormons, and other varieties of Satanist. If we’re truly a Christian land, is it right that their blasphemy should be tolerated, and worse, that they should be able to benefit from social programs paid for by Right-thinking Christians?

Should the Office of Homeland Godliness be a Cabinet-level appointment reporting to the President? Should the President be the de jure head of the Church? Should it be a separate branch of government insulated from the meddling influence of future secular legislators, and especially from Satanic minions on the Supreme Court? Or, for that matter, should we rework the government and Constitution so that we replace the democracy with a Christian theocracy?

The folks who are pushing for a return to Christian America are generally part of a community that is overwhelmingly evangelical – ironically, a group that was an excluded minority during the founding period. They can convince themselves that they represent the vast majority of Christians in America.

But in truth, the evangelical sub-culture represents just over a quarter of the population these days, and groups like the Catholics and the “nones” are swiftly gaining ground. If if really came down to a matter of defining which brand of Christianity was to become the new established religion, there’s gonna be a fight. The Christian church barely survived the first Nicea, I’m not sure that American Christianity can survive a second one.

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Atheists in the Evangelical Mind
You Can't Keep a Bad Man Down

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