Recipe Swap

Hemant posted this “scripture cake” recipe and invited us all to share our most Biblical recipes:

I’m just glad Ezekiel 4:12 didn’t make it in, “And you shall eat it as a barley cake, baking it in their sight on human dung.”

For that matter, Zeke 5:10 would be pretty bad as well, “Therefore fathers shall eat their sons in the midst of you, and sons shall eat their fathers;”

Probably best to just avoid Ezekiel all together.

I’m not really going to enter the contest, but I thought I’d share one of James McGrath’s classic recipes. The recipe for Biblical Literalism:

Take one part overly-familiar Bible verses. Repeat these verses over and over again until a thick, opaque layer is formed. Use this layer to cover the remaining 39 parts consisting of Bible verses that do not talk about the same subject as those more familiar verses, verses which seem to disagree with them, as well as verses you don’t understand, verses you understand but do not put into practice, and any other verses you could happily live without. Bake until the lower verses are obscured from view.

Avoid stirring and serve.

  • Reginald Selkirk

    “a slow oven”

    Methinks the oven is not the only slow one.

  • http://www.facebook.com/carol.lynn.710 Carol Lynn

    Broth cooked with star shaped & pastina (little balls) noodles. Serve with a fork so you can separate the firmament from the waters.

    Stew made with beef, pork, & chicken – name that animal stew!

    Finish the meal with fig newtons and apple pie.

  • evodevo

    Hey! But is it kosher ?!!


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