Hypocrisy in Georgia.

There is a football coach in Georgia who is unrepentant with his trying to convert his players to Christianity.

… on game day, [coach Mark] Mariakis takes the football team to a local church for dinner. We understand that at these events the church’s preacher sermonizes to the players “about the Christian religion”… News reports show that Mariakis leads the team in pre- or post-game prayers. Our complainant reports that Mariakis uses Bible verses on team gear, such as shirts, and in speeches to excite the team… Finally, we have been told that Mariakis pressures players to attend a “Christian football camp that the players have to pay for” and that Mariakis “looks down upon” those who do not attend…

Of course, as Hemant points out, the believers are just aghast that anybody could care about this.  Plenty of church groups are rushing to Mariakis’ defense.

What gets me is the hypocrisy.  If you think it’s ok for an authority at a public school to proselytize, imagine if you had a coach telling his players that Christianity is a myth, who put “Good without god” on the team t-shirts, and who was more likely to start players who attended Skepticon.  The explosion of outrage from the same Christians would exceed the intensity of a supernova.

But when they do it?  Hell, it’s their right as Christians, and all those new atheists need to shush about it because it’s not such a big deal.  Do unto others as you would have done to you?  Fuck that noise!

What’s even worse is that when they get annihilated in court they’ll weep that those wicked atheists could deplete the schools coffers with a lawsuit over such a tiny thing as prayer.  There will be nary a concern that they were the unethical ones, just the insistence that they have a right to not be called on it.

  • jaxkayaker

    ” There will be nary a concerned that they broke the were the unethical ones, just the insistence that they have a right to not be called on it.”

    Might want to proofread and edit that last sentence.

  • http://freethoughtblogs.com/wwjtd JT Eberhard

    Yeah…done. :P

    • skeptomom

      Still not fixed.

      • http://www.freethoughtblogs.com/wwjtd Christina

        Control R – hard refresh!

  • adamblevins

    I was in the marching band at nearby Lakeview-Fort Oglethorpe High School when Mariakis was coaching there in the late nineties. Unfortunately, this is par for the course in that area. I’m just glad that someone is finally calling them out on it. On a related note, many of the marching band members at LFO chose to pray before taking the field at halftime. It was completely student led. The band director would step back and let them do their thing. Not a single word, by student or faculty, was said to or about anyone who chose to pray or who –like me — chose to abstain from the prayer.

    • http://www.nobelief.net Jasper of Maine (I feel safe and welcome at FTB)

      It’s still problematic, because it puts students in a spot where they have to explicitly opt – which many students may not be comfortable with, especially if they haven’t come out yet. It puts a divider between you and your peers, even if you’re another religion like Judaism or Islam.

      It sounds technically legal, but it’s still a shit move.

      • http://www.nobelief.net Jasper of Maine (I feel safe and welcome at FTB)

        Explicit “opt out”, that is.

      • F

        Yeah, it’s kind of like a bunch of unbelievers getting fired up with a speech or chants about how believers are weak and stoopid and how it will be therefore easy to best them.

        I’m sure the religious would have something to say about it.

        Just like if Democrats/liberals used similar rhetoric against Republicans/conservatives as is done the other way around. (All the stuff that gets expressed largely as “you’re unAmerican”.)

  • NotAProphet

    I prefer to imagine what the public response would be if the coach were a Muslim, calling on his players to crush the ‘infidels’ on the other team, insha’allah, and having the players run out amidst cries of “Allahu akbar”.

    “About that speck in your eye…”

  • anteprepro

    We understand that at these events the church’s preacher sermonizes to the players “about the Christian religion”

    Does anyone else think this statement is weird? As in, what else do we expect a church’s preacher to sermonize about? Why refer to it as “the Christian religion” instead of “Christianity”? It almost sounds like they are wannabe hipsters.

    “The preacher was talking to them about something called Jesus. It’s pretty underground, I doubt you’ve ever heard of it.”

    What’s even worse is that when they get annihilated in court they’ll weep that those wicked atheists could deplete the schools coffers with a lawsuit over such a tiny thing as prayer. There will be nary a concern that they were the unethical ones, just the insistence that they have a right to not be called on it.

    Yeah. It’s fucking ridiculous. Unthinking privilege, all the way down.


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