More update

Between naps and sleep last night, I got eleven hours of sleep.  I’ve napped a couple times today already and feel like I could sleep forever.  :)

I got through my workout today without throwing up and did the whole thing.

I’m not great, but I’m certainly not in the dire shape I was this whole last week.  I’m on the mend.

The main thing that has brought me out of it was speaking with a counselor and controlling my environment.  It’s felt like I’ve put myself in a clean room, where only the good stuff can get in.  Starting next week I’m going to have to leave the clean room, but I’m hoping I will have gotten well enough to do so.  I’m thinking I will have.

Once again, writing about this stuff is difficult, but there’s a utility to it.  Coming out about things that bear a stigma helps normalize it throughout the rest of society.  Having support from all the people who read this site, in such touching amounts, has helped me so much.  I didn’t just have people reassuring me that I am valued in their lives, I had people offering to help cover medical bills.  I even had a few people offer to come pick me up and take care of me.  My gratitude cannot be exaggerated.

Thank you.  All of you.  Thank you so much.  There cannot be a god, because he never would’ve let a hellion like me get so lucky.

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About JT Eberhard

When not defending the planet from inevitable apocalypse at the rotting hands of the undead, JT is a writer and public speaker about atheism, gay rights, and more. He spent two and a half years with the Secular Student Alliance as their first high school organizer. During that time he built the SSA’s high school program and oversaw the development of groups nationwide. JT is also the co-founder of the popular Skepticon conference and served as the events lead organizer during its first three years.