If only people knew that consequences could pop up at any time.

My roommate, Cambridge, is freaking awesome.  She’s also part of an online dating website called OKCupid.  The other day she got a message from a guy that she attempted to turn into an educational opportunity for the dude.

See, I can understand the talk about penis size.  For both Cambridge and myself, naughty bits and sex are simply not a taboo subject.  But if you’re going to adopt a pet name for someone you don’t know, that’s pretty lame.  It’s a form of subtle condescension.  Cambridge expressed this and got an all-too common response.

Now, I’m not going to say this guy is a MRA or a rape-apologist.  I don’t have that information, and I don’t believe the solution to this kind of thing is screaming at someone based on information you don’t have.  What I will say is that calling a woman a cunt in response to her expressing a dislike for being called “cutie pie” by some guy she doesn’t know is both not cool and, sadly, far too typical.  I know this guy’s not a particularly rare breed.

The problem is that there’s no real system in place for him to get the message that this is not cool.  They generally know they can get away with this stuff on the internet with no repercussion.  Wouldn’t it be nice if just once someone like this got reminded that being bad can have unexpected consequences like getting flooded with trolls and disapproval?  It’d make me smile.

Moral: be a good person, even when it won’t get you sex and even when nobody is looking, otherwise some guy on the internet might direct a few thousand people to your page.

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About JT Eberhard

When not defending the planet from inevitable apocalypse at the rotting hands of the undead, JT is a writer and public speaker about atheism, gay rights, and more. He spent two and a half years with the Secular Student Alliance as their first high school organizer. During that time he built the SSA’s high school program and oversaw the development of groups nationwide. JT is also the co-founder of the popular Skepticon conference and served as the events lead organizer during its first three years.