How an angry, bitter, atheist activist spends the holidays.

You’d be hard-pressed to find someone who spends more time combing the news, reading of the folly of religion, and being good and pissed as I.  So what do mean-spirited killjoys like myself do around the holidays?

  • Watched Love Actually with my fiancee (she’d never seen it).  Now she wants to get married twice.
  • Watched The Hobbit with my family (and my fiancee).  I had heard reports that it was mediocre, but we all enjoyed it very much.  Due to its length, we were worried there would be dead spots, but there really weren’t.
  • Watched Rise of the Guardians with Cambridge.  It’s really good.  I recommend it.  We both left the theater wondering who voiced the bad guy, because he totally stole the show.  It was freaking Jude Law as the bad guy.  To quote Cambridge in talking about Hugh Jackman (who voiced the Easter Bunny): “I’d suck so many dicks to get to his.”
  • One of my two best friends from high school (the only two I still speak to regularly) is visiting from Korea for a couple of weeks.  He brought over a board game called Dungeons & Dragons: Lords of Waterdeep.  I’m far too cool to know what Dungeons & Dragons is, but the game is totally freaking fun.  I want to play it non-stop.
  • The other of my two best friends from high school will drive in from Mississippi today just to spend time with the guys (and my fiancee).  We’ll be play-testing Dungeons & Dragons 5e.  Once again, I’m far too cool for this, and am only doing it because they’re dragging me against my will.  *makes a bluff check*
  • Watched the Razorbacks play with the family (and the fiancee).

And I bought presents and all that jazz too.  I got really good presents for my family this year (will tell you what they are after Friendsmas, since they all read the blog).  Life is good, and it’s better with a healthy family and with friends.

This is what atheist activists do.  Our lives are generally full of joy, with no need to drag our asses out of bed on Sunday morning to hear someone preach at us (contrary to the narrative that people can’t be happy without this).  Though our justifiable rage at the legion of religious foolishness is what gets seen, that is only a sliver of our lives.

This is also why we are activists.  We know the value of relationships, of happiness in this life, and become offended when religion prevents those things in the lives of people who haven’t adopted religion of their own volition.  It also tugs at our empathy and makes us sad when religion prevents happiness in the lives of those who have adopted it on their own (I recall wanting to touch someone I cared deeply about when I was young, but wouldn’t do so because my religion forbade me that happiness).  And we shake our heads at the insecurity of many believers who insist that happiness at any time, but particularly during the holidays, should only be available by adopting their approved routes to happiness rather than our own.  Note, nowhere on that list did I write “stewing over other people not valuing the same things I value during an arbitrary time of the year”.

I should also mention that I’ve never been kissed as the ball has dropped on New Year’s Eve.  I’ve always wanted to do that and, finally, this year I think I’m going to get to.  :)  As I said yesterday: if the blogging gets a little slow over the next week, now you know why.

Happy holidays, everybody.

The wife is getting ideas.
A year ago today...
I got to watch the son of Fred Phelps officiate the wedding of two lesbians.
On our way to a weekend of real American patriotism.
About JT Eberhard

When not defending the planet from inevitable apocalypse at the rotting hands of the undead, JT is a writer and public speaker about atheism, gay rights, and more. He spent two and a half years with the Secular Student Alliance as their first high school organizer. During that time he built the SSA’s high school program and oversaw the development of groups nationwide. JT is also the co-founder of the popular Skepticon conference and served as the events lead organizer during its first three years.


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