North Carolina could stop the anti-abortion license plate bleeding, but they won’t.

In 2011, North Carolina passed a bill that would allow its citizens to get vanity anti-abortion license plates.

Immediately, the ACLU filed a case against it.  It was an open and shut case in which the plates were deemed unconstitutional.

“This is a great victory for the free speech rights of all North Carolinians, regardless of their point of view on reproductive freedom,” said Chris Brook of the ACLU. “The government cannot create an avenue of expression for one side of a contentious political issue while denying an equal opportunity to citizens with the opposite view.”

And he’s right.  The state could have also put out a pro-choice license plate, but decided not to.

During the fight to get the bill passed, North Carolina lawmakers voted down amendments that would have created pro-choice alternatives such as “Trust Women. Respect Choice,” the affiliate reported.

Because governing in the interest of all of your citizens equally is so passé.  But don’t worry, the state’s leadership is set to piss away tax dollars on a separation case that couldn’t even be won with the Chewbacca defense.

Republican state Rep. Mitch Gillespie, who sponsored the bill for the “Choose Life” plates, said he would push for an appeal of the judge’s decision, CNN affiliate WRAL reported.

The pricey appeal, doomed to failure from the outset, will be supported by the same voters who will later bemoan wasteful spending in government while supporting these same legislators.

About JT Eberhard

When not defending the planet from inevitable apocalypse at the rotting hands of the undead, JT is a writer and public speaker about atheism, gay rights, and more. He spent two and a half years with the Secular Student Alliance as their first high school organizer. During that time he built the SSA’s high school program and oversaw the development of groups nationwide. JT is also the co-founder of the popular Skepticon conference and served as the events lead organizer during its first three years.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X