When Christians try to “help” gay teens.

The “don’t say gay” bill in Tennessee died last year, but it has now resurfaced with provisions that would require teachers and counselors to out LGBT teens to their parents.

The general assembly recognizes that certain subjects are particularly sensitive and are, therefore, best explained and discussed within the home. Because of its complex societal, scientific, psychological, and historical implications, human sexuality is one such subject. Human sexuality is best understood by children with sufficient maturity to grasp its complexity and implications [...]

A school counselor, nurse, principal or assistant principal from counseling a student who is engaging in, or who may be at risk of engaging in, behavior injurious to the physical or mental health and well-being of the student or another person; provided, that wherever possible such counseling shall be done in consultation with the student’s parents or legal guardians. Parents or legal guardians of students who receive such counseling shall be notified as soon as practicable that such counseling has occurred

The rationale is that homosexuality is a subject best managed at home, and that LGBT teens need their parents.  Only that’s not always true.  What those teens need is somebody who understands which, in a state thick with religion like Tennessee, is often not their parents.

The effect of this measure is to keep teen struggling with their sexual identity in the closet.  That’s a terrible thing, and it’s depressing considering that compassion is being advanced as the motivation for the policy.

Love the sinner, hate the sin.  Just another entry on the long list of ways Christians try to dress up discrimination as love.

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About JT Eberhard

When not defending the planet from inevitable apocalypse at the rotting hands of the undead, JT is a writer and public speaker about atheism, gay rights, and more. He spent two and a half years with the Secular Student Alliance as their first high school organizer. During that time he built the SSA’s high school program and oversaw the development of groups nationwide. JT is also the co-founder of the popular Skepticon conference and served as the events lead organizer during its first three years.