A look at how the Pope selection reflects on Catholics and LGBT rights.

Gay marriage is going to happen.  Equality for LGBT people is going to happen.  However, it will happen faster if we’re praising a Pope for hauling the Catholic Church out of the Dark Ages rather than criticizing him for failing to let the Catholic Church grow up.  Sadly, I think we’re in for a lot of the latter.

I would also like to point out that it says a lot about your organization if having a new leader who can just manage to not abet child rapists would be an improvement.  For many Catholics who thought the last Pope was grand (that would be the Pope whose ridiculous policy on condoms cost an uncountable number of lives to AIDS the world over and whose priorities were to protect the predators of children rather than their victims), it strains the limits of imagination to conceive of a Pope so terrible they would not celebrate him as a promising leader.  That says not only a lot about Catholics, it also says a lot about their religion’s potential to make them tolerant of inhumanity – all while praising the church as a moral beacon.

Hemant commented on Bergoglio’s homophobia.

You heard it: Gay marriage is of the devil! The kicker: Argentina passed marriage equality in 2010 anyway, becoming the first Latin American nation to do so. So much for that.

When that legislation was being considered, Bergoglio called marriage equality a “real and dire anthropological throwback”.  And yet, by Numbeo’s quality of life index, Argentina’s rating jumped from a score of 32.58 in 2012 to 72.53 in 2013 (Bergoglio has also said that Argentina has made great progress).  I guess he’s only infallible once he becomes Pope.  Up to that point he can be wrong about plenty of stuff.  In this case, Argentina (and humanity) is trucking along just fine letting people marry the adult of the adult of their choice.

Anyway, today I’ll be reading the Catholic blogs and trying not to have an aneurism.  I’ll report throughout the day.

About JT Eberhard

When not defending the planet from inevitable apocalypse at the rotting hands of the undead, JT is a writer and public speaker about atheism, gay rights, and more. He spent two and a half years with the Secular Student Alliance as their first high school organizer. During that time he built the SSA’s high school program and oversaw the development of groups nationwide. JT is also the co-founder of the popular Skepticon conference and served as the events lead organizer during its first three years.


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