The wealth inequality in America is not ideal. Duh.

Here’s a video that spells out the breadth of the problem with wealth inequality in the United States.  It makes a bad argument in part, relying on the opinion of non-experts to identify the ideal wealth distribution.  That aside, there’s obviously a problem and this video helps us to see just how far it stretches.

And with that, it’s time to start drinking.

This gets even worse when you realize that there are two groups that don’t really pay taxes in this country: the poor because we have compassion, and the wealthy because they have power.  With the poor, you can’t really get blood from a stone.  And why would you want their financial blood when they need to do things like, y’know, eat.

But the super wealthy?  They’ve got the cash to spend.  Take companies like Boeing, whose research is subsidized by tax-payers before Boeing reaps all the profits, with the taxpayers going out of pocket again to produce the planes and military tech resulting from that research.  Or take Continental Resources, whose CEO argued before Congress last year to complain about how a 3.2% effective income tax rate (which has dipped as low as .1%) was too much.

Letting those companies (and the people who siphon off exorbitant salaries and bonuses from them) get away with hardly paying any tax shifts the burden to the sole remaining bracket: the middle class.  This is not ideal nor is it fair.  We should all complain to our representatives.  I say “our” representatives as if they weren’t the 1% with the power or their bought and paid for lackeys.

About JT Eberhard

When not defending the planet from inevitable apocalypse at the rotting hands of the undead, JT is a writer and public speaker about atheism, gay rights, and more. He spent two and a half years with the Secular Student Alliance as their first high school organizer. During that time he built the SSA’s high school program and oversaw the development of groups nationwide. JT is also the co-founder of the popular Skepticon conference and served as the events lead organizer during its first three years.