Hospital fighting to save a young girl’s life from her parents’ beliefs.

In Ohio there is an Amish couple with the misfortune of having their daughter stricken with cancer.  Initially the couple decided god wouldn’t help their child, but that perhaps mortal doctors could (that’s a bit of snark, they actually thought god would help their daughter but that doctors would make it more likely for god to help, fancy that).  They’ve since changed their mind.

The parents initially allowed chemotherapy treatment in May but stopped treatment in June. The parents said the effects on their daughter were horrible and that they were now relying on natural medicines, such as herbs and vitamins, The Medina Gazette reported.

Understandably, this bothers the hospital who realize that these parents are metaphorically building their daughter’s casket.

The hospital believes the girl will die without chemotherapy and is morally and legally obligated to make sure she receives proper care, said Robert McGregor, the hospital’s chief medical officer.

“We really have to advocate for what we believe is in the best interest of the child,” he said Friday.

The hospital is fighting the parents in court to force them to give their daughter a chance to live.

The ironic thing is that both parties want the girl to live.  But because a bad idea has gripped the girl’s parents, even though they want their child to live, they are killing her.  The question facing the courts will be what is more important: the will of a parent (and respect for their wrong, but sacred beliefs) or reality.  It’s a little depressing the battle must even be fought.

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About JT Eberhard

When not defending the planet from inevitable apocalypse at the rotting hands of the undead, JT is a writer and public speaker about atheism, gay rights, and more. He spent two and a half years with the Secular Student Alliance as their first high school organizer. During that time he built the SSA’s high school program and oversaw the development of groups nationwide. JT is also the co-founder of the popular Skepticon conference and served as the events lead organizer during its first three years.